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Vincent Tools


Chris Launders

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The Vincent chewed a front exhaust pushrod a couple of years ago and my beloved came and picked me up in our van, but you wouldn't have fixed that leaving all the alloy in the timing chest. The Norvin killed a battery a few years ago but you have to take the back wheel out to get to that and it only has a side stand, anyway I wasn't riding it at the time, a mate was so he just jumped on the back of me and we fetched the van, the 1150 burnt a plug out 10 years ago which is why I needed to sort the carb. Other than that, I seem to remember a clutch cable breaking on one of my Triumphs about '98 and it threw a rod in 1996, Ok I'm just lucky I guess although I do remember a period in the 70s when I seemed to get a puncture almost every week !!
 

ogrilp400

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Dear All,
Speaking of tools, has anyone ever made up a tool for holding measuring pins and the half time pinion whilst measuring them with a micrometer? Yes I know it can be done with rubber bands but its fiddly especially when measuring multiple pinions. I have a few ideas but no use reinventing the wheel so to speak.
Phelps.
 

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
What keeps the motor from rotating down? Also, I assume the different shape of the G50 is for various high-speed reasons? :D

 

litnman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The G50 butts tight to the stands mounting plate. It is .375 thick and will carry an outboard bearing shaft support so the sprocket
can be moved out to clear the wider tire.
 

litnman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
My engine stand in post 27 is the correct height for adding RFM and UFM while on the bike stand. No more lifting for me.
The plates on the engine shown require 3" blocking to get it to the correct height to add the LSR frame.
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Pat Manning dragged out an interesting tool to do wrist pin bushes in situ.
DSCN2837.jpg
This tool is used to remove the worn wrist pin. It has a long and a short side. I think you start with the short side and then use the long side to finish.
DSCN2831.jpg
Another tool can be inserted over two studs and held in place by two tubes and some head nuts.
DSCN2833.jpg
This is a top down view of one of the reamers at work.
DSCN2835.jpg
The con rod is held securely by two eccentrics which can be turned in place and then locked.

David
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Interesting.... I'm assuming those two doodads that hold the rod are eccentric?
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Yes. Pat said he bought this from Sid Dickson. Sid had it made in Germany, I believe, when he was travelling around on a Vincent and ran into the problem. He talks about his travels in some early MPH's. The maker was Hunger.

David
 

oexing

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The Hunger company still offers great products for the motor trade. I use most reamers from them for engine and girder fork jobs, valve seats too:

Link to Hunger:
Hunger
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Yes. Pat said he bought this from Sid Dickson. Sid had it made in Germany, I believe, when he was travelling around on a Vincent and ran into the problem. He talks about his travels in some early MPH's. The maker was Hunger.

David
I guess I missed that in your post... have to work on my reading comprehension. Could be the welding fumes though.
According to this guy, you can just do it with a $10.50 reamer off Ebay! (Warning... nauseating content)
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I mentioned this tool earlier, but I did not show what it does.
DSCN2858.jpg
Made from strap. I hold it up to the crankcase and the brass nut at the back of the timing cover.
DSCN2852.jpg
Squeeze the handles...
DSCN2853.jpg
...and the timing case pops open. This is very handy if you don't use a gasket or you have trouble loosening the cover. I use a high pipe on the racer, but it works so well that if I had exhaust pipes in the way I would modify the design a bit to make it work with the pipes in the way.

David
 

Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Squeeze the handles... ...and the timing case pops open.
For what it's worth, this is the tool I made to do the same job on a Gold Star.TimingCover03.jpg
Mark I of the tool is shown in use at the left, with Mark II at the right. The updated version dispenses with the need for a spacer under the "foot," and the addition of a cutout places the lip of the timing cover in line with the axis from the foot to the other end that pivots against the bulge for the oil pump. With rubber against steel and Al against Al the cover comes off without drama and nothing gets scratched. I'm sure I'll make something equivalent for my Vincent's engine. When I get that far...
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Here is my contribution, I already have the photo so I guess I told the story somewhere in early forum however:
This fits over the G34 Camplate spindle slots and is secured to it by a 1/4" cap screw. A good torque is then accomplished via the hexagon I have better judgment of torque via spanners than a screwdriver etc ,and of course this method is easy when headroom is limited

1548668621413.jpeg
 

Little Honda

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
All this talk of piston stops has lead me to look at my tools. I thought some of these and the tools of others might be useful to see:

Piston Stop:
View attachment 13026

This is the end of a slide puller, that is a long stud with a sliding weight. I welded a nut that matched the puller's thread onto some round stock that I drilled and tapped for the cam spindle threads. It make it easy to pull them out or adjust the height of the spindle in place:

View attachment 13027

Take the cam spindle puller off and this is an adapter to pull out the oil pump body. It is usually tough removing these, but they are a firm push fit in, so no tool necessary for installation:
View attachment 13028

David
What heat value does the plug have?
on mine I have filed a flat along the thread, to allow compressed air to escape, when the piston approaches
tdc. This makes it more easy to turn flywheels by small amounts.
 

b'knighted

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I had Rotary Norton’s. To facilitate cover removal the bores of the screw holes were tapped the next size up. I think of them as 1/4 cover screws with 5/16 extractor thread but they were probably metric. The “5/16” screw needed was holding an inlet pipe just above the cover so only an a second Allen key was needed. The cover screws were also fitted with ‘O’ rings which sat under their heads in the counterbores.
 

oexing

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The trick with the extractor thread is the only way to separate a cover that is flush all around it to the crank case like on the 460 Horex in the photo. Most covers have 1/4 screws or 6mm to hold onto the engine. The next suitable size in the through hole in the cover is 5/16 for US Americans, the rest of world will find a M 8 metric tap and screw. You can tap the cover on the bike at opposite sides when the need arises and for very short available thread length in the cover the typical single cut tap will lift the cover as soon as it bottoms at the smaller case thread . Else you will just tap for a healthy length of thread in the cover, push in a piece of 5mm rod, long enough to bottom in the engine case and a extractor screw will push onto that 5 mm rod to lift the case. A grub screw flush in the case will do just fine instead of the rod.
It is easier to do than to describe but you don´t have to design some other means of forcing the cover to break loose.

Vic
IMG00014.JPG
 
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