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Vincent Tools


bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Please post pix of the large Al plate with appropriate spacers for mounting the UFM on an engine stand to allow it to be rotated through 360-deg. Also, what work does that facilitate?
 

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
That 9 hole tool is shown on p.220 of 40YO, Apparently another one exists in the wilds of Hayling Island.
 

Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Magnetoman you have an impressive collection of special tools there.......I still can't work out what the bottom one is for though.....It looks like it sits over the clutch carrier pins, but I don't know why you would need to.....Just asking a simple one......Cheers ...........Greg.
Greg,
If you think that's impressive, you ought to see the number of special tools I've made for my BSAs. Actually, now that I think of it, you can see those special tools in the following post and the ones that follow:

http://www.britbike.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=468027#Post468027

Keeping in mind I haven't used it, so it might well be useless, it viewed that bottom tool as something that must slip over the ESA to hold it from turning while a nut is tightened. A tool that does this for BSAs is shown in the above link, consisting of two clutch plates bolted together (one with inner splines and the other with outer) to lock the clutch while a gearbox nut is tightened. In any case, I got the design from some old issue of MPH and made mine out of a single piece of stainless instead of how it was described there.

However, the fact you don't know what it is makes me now think that when I get to the point I might need to use it I'll see that there's no need for it...
 

Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Please post pix of the large Al plate with appropriate spacers for mounting the UFM on an engine stand to allow it to be rotated through 360-deg. Also, what work does that facilitate?
Bruce,

Here it is, with the photo taken from above to eliminate visual clutter:
VincentTools002.jpg

The engine stand is a standard 3-wheel version. Removing the pin in the top allows it to spin 360 deg. with holes in the inner shaft to allow reinserting the pin every 30 or 60 deg. (I don't remember which). The spacers allow the UFM to be bolted parallel to the plate with enough standoff not to touch. My idea in making this is it would serve as the "rotisserie" car people use in frame-off restorations allowing me pretty much full and easy access to all parts of the machine as I assembled it. When it had served its purpose I would use my (modified) engine hoist to move it to an elevated work bench.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
When I built my Grey Flash replica I made 2 C shaped stand legs that bolted to the bike hydraulic platform (with the C the other way) and the top of the C stands used two bottom studs holes of the crankcase with longer than normal studs to mount the crankcase assembly on. I built the entire engine and then the bike on that stand. going up and down as required. When completed I lowered the bike onto a plank strapped it up to my sky hooks removed the legs replaced the studs and wheeled it away
 

clevtrev

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The half time pinion puller, needs three extra tapped holes in it for the Comet dynamo sprocket removal.

My contribution to this thread is the following:
View attachment 13042
(note: the photo doesn't show up in the preview but a link to it does; apologies in advance if the image is missing)

When I got my Vincent in the early '90s I also put together a pretty complete collection of M.P.H. as well as all books and manuals. Whenever I ran across the description of a special tool in any of that material I made it in preparation for use in what may be the world's slowest restoration...

Having not used most of these tools I don't know yet whether some might be useless, unneeded, or better replaced with something else. With that disclaimer in mind, proceeding from top to bottom and left to right the identification I wrote on the tools when I made them are:

Rear spring claw removal wrench
7/8" x 8" rod for locking engine (through small end of con rod)
0.755" straightening clamp for UFM
ESA nut removal sprag
5/16" tapered rod for mounting degree wheel
0.36" ID x 0.44" OD valve guide removal drift
1.6" ID clamp for flanging front exhaust pipe
Peen for steering damper disc
(2) 3-1/2" rods for spindle assembly
Oil pump removal slide hammer
7/8" expanding mandrel for gearbox bearing removal (and adapter for slide hammer)
Half-time pinion puller
9-hole ESA spanner

Not shown (because I forgot to take a photo of it this morning) is a large Al plate with appropriate spacers for mounting the UFM on an engine stand to allow it to be rotated through 360-deg. Also not shown are special tools that I could purchase (e.g. valve guide lockring tool).
 

Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I realized I have two more items that might count as Vincent "special tools." I have an hydraulic lift that is very handy for maintaining my bikes that are already running, but I don't want to tie it up for months (years, decades, ...) on a restoration. Instead, I made wood rolling benches that also have the advantage of taking up a lot less space. It's easy to lift a bike onto one of these benches with my customized engine hoist (discussed below), and then to lift the restored bike off again the same way when it's done. I have stands for each of the three bikes I'm pretending to be actively restoring. The photograph shows one of these rolling stands (it's 25" high and 2x6 ft.) onto which I was lifting my Vincent at the time:
VincentTools003.jpg

This photograph also shows my customized Harbor Freight 1 Ton engine hoist. I increased its height by 15" using 1/8" wall steel pipe (not water pipe) and its lifting capacity to a full 1 T with the boom fully extended. The 1" square tubing and aircraft cable at the base were temporary stabilizers to allow experimenting with different heights, however I was happy with 15" and subsequently welded brackets to it. I used this modified hoist with the boom fully extended to lift my ~1800-lb. milling machine on and off a trailer when I bought it, and again when I moved to my current house, without it showing any sign of distress so I don't have any concern using it with 400-lb. motorcycles.

As can be seen from this photo the height and configuration of this modified hoist make it easy to lift bikes on and off these stands. The reason I customized a 1 T hoist rather than just using a standard 2 T version is because my modifications give me one that is both taller and takes up quite a bit less floor space when in its folded configuration than the 2 T, while providing the same lifting capacity. Ideally the arm of such a hoist would be nearly horizontal when used so the load would be lifted straight up (and dropped straight down) for precise positioning and with the 15" increased height it comes close to that ideal.
 

litnman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
When this stand is in place it sits level on the floor. The UFM and RFM can then be removed or attached.
Eng Stand.jpg

The spanner is on a 3/4 breaker bar /spanner socket fits the Alpha big end nut.
 

Attachments

Last edited by a moderator:

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I wanted to do something like John's, But didn't have the Metal, So I got some old wood etc, And a Bucket, At one stage it started to look like a Toilet !!, Always handy !!. When you have a bad back you have to do these things. Well I thought it was Funny. Cheers Bill.002.JPG
 

Sakura

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Here's 2 of my many Vincent tools - most of which I didn't mark and have forgotten what they're for!. I sometimes wonder if I don't have the bikes just to make and use tools on............ The most complicated gets used the least and the least complicated the most.IMG_0105 (2).JPG IMG_0107 (2).JPG IMG_0106 (2).JPG
 

Oldhaven

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
From the stone axe school of motorcycle repair here are:

The A2 bar I used to straighten a bent UFM and check alignment
A homemade broach used to clean up a buggered kickstart spline. I did make one capable of cutting new splines, but passed it on years ago.
A BF nut and bolt used to correct minor flywheel misalignment, a partner to the BF lead hammer
 

Attachments

Sakura

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
How do you use this?
It's the plastic top off a welding rod tube. Cut down the side and top to fit round the oil tank neck, secured with parcel tape (nice and thin). Cut the bottom to match the angle the neck of the UFM. Position over the neck and slide the tank over it when removing and refitting. It took longer to write this than to make it and it works really well.
 

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Good idea. I use a couple of wraps of duct tape, but if I find a plastic tube with the right diameter, I'll copy this.
 

craig

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I need ideas for a better timing disc/wheel. I have a disc I have been using for years , friction fit in the quill hole...but I am wanting a better fit , on center ... maybe there are better designs or?
20150209_CamTimingComet.jpg
 

b'knighted

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I saw tonight that Vocspares list K36, K36-1 and K36-kit which are timing discs and friction spindles. If you modify your spindle it is possible to run the disc inboard of the exhaust allowing a shorter, more rigid pointer. Vibrac screws his short pointer into the banjo hole.
 

craig

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thanks BK, I ordered such.
Can a dial indicator be used for TDC?
Is so, where is a robust Vincent unit available.
anyone have details about such a unit on a Vincent twin please?
Why is there not a digital system of equipment to accurately time Vincent cams.
Some sort of large serrated disc that reads crank degrees, while logging data from two or four valve tip indicators?
Just a thought in my frustration over accurate cam timing.
digicamphoto.jpg
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Think about it Craig. There are few degrees near to TDC where the piston hardly moves up and down at all. Some simple geometry will tell you how much but that will ignore slop and wear in various places. Yes, you could use a dial gauge and in the olden days people were even known to use a bubble over the spark plug hole. If you want it right, as opposed to nearly right, then find TDC with a piston stop that works well down the bore before and after TDC and then split the difference to set up your zero.
 

litnman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The DigiCam is great if you have several hundred dollars burning a hole in your pocket. Maybe you could rent it out to pay for it.
 

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