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Vincent Tools


davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
All this talk of piston stops has lead me to look at my tools. I thought some of these and the tools of others might be useful to see:

Piston Stop:
Tools 13.jpg

This is the end of a slide puller, that is a long stud with a sliding weight. I welded a nut that matched the puller's thread onto some round stock that I drilled and tapped for the cam spindle threads. It make it easy to pull them out or adjust the height of the spindle in place:

Tools 9.jpg

Take the cam spindle puller off and this is an adapter to pull out the oil pump body. It is usually tough removing these, but they are a firm push fit in, so no tool necessary for installation:
Tools 10.jpg

David
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Some Egli Vincent tools. The first is used to unscrew Monza caps that have been stuck on too tight. I hook the tool on the hinge and it follows the form of the cap. I have never damaged a cap, but it is certainly possible with the leverage:
Tools 6.jpg

This tool is for a modern front end. The GSXR front end is used on some Eglis and they have a special tool for the frong axle. Buy a large bolt that fits inside the axle and weld it to a handle:
Tools 26.jpg
David
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Hello David, Do you reamer out the 1" bore for the oil pump body, We have a new one to put in soon and it's a bit tight, We warmed it up a bit to get the old one out with a slide hamer like yours, but as had been said, I don't want to force the new one in, Cheers Bill.
 

clevtrev

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Take a piece of 5/8" dia steel bar, about 7 or 8 inches long, drill and tap 5/16" BSF in one end, weld a thick washer on the other end, fashion a weight out of a lump with a hole through it. The remaining bits you need are all on the bike. Engine stud with whit thread on one end, BSF on the other, long nut nut that goes under the K/S cover to join to the engine stud that goes through the stand plate, which is the extension when needed for the oil pump body.
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Hello David, Do you reamer out the 1" bore for the oil pump body, We have a new one to put in soon and it's a bit tight, We warmed it up a bit to get the old one out with a slide hamer like yours, but as had been said, I don't want to force the new one in, Cheers Bill.
Bill,

Yes. A few days ago one such reaming occurred. Pat Manning had a set of new cases and we had an esteemed guest from the UK who agreed to twist the thing just enough to clean it out while praying that it was not tapered. He did so just as promised.

Richardson says the oil pump sleeve should be a "push fit" in the case.

David
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
This was the first Vincent tool I saw at Coburn Benson's shop, although it is not specific to Vincents. A spark plug end welded to a some round stock. Screw the spark plug end in the head and mount the bar end in the vice for changing and lapping valves, etc:
Tools 12.jpg
Half time pinion puller. I seem to make one every time I take and engine apart:
Tools 20.jpg

Dial indicator mounts for the end of the rocker arms when you don't have access to the top of the valve:
Tools 25.jpg

David
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Some tools for the racer. The Newby engine sprocket can often be tight on the shaft and I had to pull it on and off several times to relieve it. I converted a BMW/2 puller that I had by drilling two holes for long bolts that screw into the sprocket. I made handler for to hold the body and one to turn the bolt:
Tools 7.jpg

I also needed a sprocket for the CS nut. I sawed apart the right size socket from a flea market purchase and welded a piece of pipe in:
Tools 22.jpg

This tool was very useful. I place it down on behind the brass nut on the timing cover to the left of the quill, one side on the crank case and the other side on the backside of the brass nut. When squeezed, it gets wider and the timing chest cover pops off. I have a high pipe on the racer so it works fine. With stock pipes it would need a new design. I wish I had thought of this sooner:
Tools 14.jpg

David
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I love tools, Trouble is after all these years I have forgot what I have, Just pulled an oil pump with a slide hammer/ Bolt/ washer, And just found the proper end to go with the slide hammer, Silly old ---.
 

TouringComet

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Administrator
DSC02495.JPG This was posted before, but this is a nice place to collect everything together. This is a tool made by Mike Parti, for removing the cylinder/muff, avoiding the danger of breaking a fin.
 

Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
for removing the cylinder/muff, avoiding the danger of breaking a fin.
It probably will be obvious as soon as you explain, but at the moment I can't picture how it works. What is the reason for the slit, and what do the two bolts/nuts/studs do? Is the flat spot at the ~8:00 position significant, or was it there in the scrap piece of metal used to make the tool?
 

Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The short bolt expands the disc against the cylinder wall, the longer bolt is just a handle. Once the disc is in place, use the piston to push it up.
Ah, now it makes sense. Thank you. So, I'm guessing that, rather than being a tapered bolt, the hole for the short bolt is only tapped part way to provide a taper against which the bolt pushes(?).
 

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
A pair of bushings to slip over the cam spindles with an OD a hair bigger than the cam base circles would be handy to adjust the valve lifters.
 

Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
My contribution to this thread is the following:
ViincentTools001.jpg
(note: the photo doesn't show up in the preview but a link to it does; apologies in advance if the image is missing)

When I got my Vincent in the early '90s I also put together a pretty complete collection of M.P.H. as well as all books and manuals. Whenever I ran across the description of a special tool in any of that material I made it in preparation for use in what may be the world's slowest restoration...

Having not used most of these tools I don't know yet whether some might be useless, unneeded, or better replaced with something else. With that disclaimer in mind, proceeding from top to bottom and left to right the identification I wrote on the tools when I made them are:

Rear spring claw removal wrench
7/8" x 8" rod for locking engine (through small end of con rod)
0.755" straightening clamp for UFM
ESA nut removal sprag
5/16" tapered rod for mounting degree wheel
0.36" ID x 0.44" OD valve guide removal drift
1.6" ID clamp for flanging front exhaust pipe
Peen for steering damper disc
(2) 3-1/2" rods for spindle assembly
Oil pump removal slide hammer
7/8" expanding mandrel for gearbox bearing removal (and adapter for slide hammer)
Half-time pinion puller
9-hole ESA spanner

Not shown (because I forgot to take a photo of it this morning) is a large Al plate with appropriate spacers for mounting the UFM on an engine stand to allow it to be rotated through 360-deg. Also not shown are special tools that I could purchase (e.g. valve guide lockring tool).
 

greg brillus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Magnetoman you have an impressive collection of special tools there.......I still can't work out what the bottom one is for though.....It looks like it sits over the clutch carrier pins, but I don't know why you would need to.....Just asking a simple one......Cheers ...........Greg.
 

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