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Vincent Tools


Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The DigiCam is great if you have several hundred dollars burning a hole in your pocket. Maybe you could rent it out to pay for it.
With that DigiCam you would have to machine your own adapters to lock it to the Vincent crank or cam, plus fix the housing to the engine. Given this, for only ~$50 you can buy a rotary shaft encoder with its own digital display and spend the same amount of time machining adapters. Since with modern fuels we're just guessing on the timing to within a degree or two anyway so 0.1-deg. resolution is of marginal practical value for that. However, it is useful for checking the cams.

If you were doing this regularly it would be worth it to have digital interfaces to write all the data directly to a computer file. But for those of us who aren't making a regular business of it, it isn't all that inconvenient to write down a crank rotation angle along with the lift(s) of dial indicators in contact with cam(s) lobes, then move to another angle and write down the new values, etc.
 

craig

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Sorry, I got a little depressed when my well used Webco timing disc would not hold a setting. I worked the stem over with a large hammer....fits fine , holds a setting.
So crossover at 4ºBTDC?
Retapped D caps with dials from Ebay reading valve ends.
Washers holding cams to allow half time retime.
Cam gears installed by Megacycle - marks right on the money!
Webco disc mounted on brass tube, inserted smaller dia aluminum tube to fit quill bore, hammer aluminum tube section to fit.
20150625_NewMegaCycleCams.jpg
 

b'knighted

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I was forced to go shopping for plumbing parts. I knew I could get what I wanted in Wickes but B&Q was nearer . (Wickes =Home Depot - B&Q not so equal) I always check out the tools and I found this inexpensive item.Brampton key.jpg

It was cheap enough to take a chance on one of its two square sockets being close to the size I needed.

This is part of the continuing saga of my first foray into Brampton forks - these are series B forks fitted on a pre-war Meteor. Having been to Bananaman's excellent emporium for wheel building lessons and the loan of a B headstem, he gave me a quick demo of how to unscrew Brampton spindles.
I found that using a small spanner to fit the squared spindle end was unsatisfactory as it would spin off an need me to crawl under the bike to pick it up. Using a 10" adjustable was better but very fiddly.
This key fitted 3 spindle ends, the fourth being slightly burred needed the touch of a file to fit in the key. It really does make spindle removal/adjustment very easy as it stays securely on the spindle as I change my grip. I may even buy a second so that I can do both spindles ambidextrously.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
You cant beat B&Q for selling the wrong things for the right jobs must drive their marketing department mad. who needs all those rubber door stops? -I do and none are screwed to the floor;)
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have never used this, but Pat Manning got it from Big Sid. It is a jig to install and ream a small end in situ. The long tubes slide over the cylinder studs. The jig is then placed on the studs and positioned to grab the connecting rod. The two con rod grabbers are eccentric to hold the rod firmly. It is all machined, by Bill Jean I assume, to hold everything square. The bushing installer/remover is in the lower left. I have left out the machined spacers and washers for clarity.

Small End Jig Sid.JPG

David
 

Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
a jig to install and ream a small end in situ. The long tubes slide over the cylinder studs. The jig is then placed on the studs ...
Hmm. If you knew from previous work on a given engine that its deck is precisely square to the crankshaft, and if the long tubes are precisely the same length, and if the axis of the hole for the reamer is precisely parallel to the bracket that bolts to the tubes, I can see that this jig could ream the small end correctly parallel to the crankshaft (even if the connecting rod were bent). But, if any one of those conditions isn't met...
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Hmm. If you knew from previous work on a given engine that its deck is precisely square to the crankshaft, and if the long tubes are precisely the same length, and if the axis of the hole for the reamer is precisely parallel to the bracket that bolts to the tubes, I can see that this jig could ream the small end correctly parallel to the crankshaft (even if the connecting rod were bent). But, if any one of those conditions isn't met...
All true. I think it is the best of the non-total-tear-down repairs. This would have been useful to me back in the 1970's. Everything I have now is together or in a thousand pieces. I have new rods for the last of the basket case Comets. However, someone wrote me recently and wanted to replace the small ends without a total rebuild. It was then I realized that this tool could save a lot of grief in repairing an otherwise nice running bike that might be a little tired, but not ready for the sheet and the corner quite yet. Additionally, Bill Jean had quite a reputation in the eastern US as an exceptional machinist. He made quite a few nice tools for Sid.

David
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
There is one tool I never venture any distance without, I never even knew its proper (US) name till I saw back in the sixties a regular feature in that rare (in the UK) bike ikon 'Cycle world', and now I have just seen Ridley Scott classic THE MARTIAN it is a no brainer..... Duct Tape.
 

dagriise@online.no

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
Does any one have a picture, or even better, a drawing of a better version of the "sheet metal" spanner for tightening the push rod tube upper ring nuts?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Pushrod Twin

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The K1 spanner obtainable from any Vincent spares supplier
Optional corkscrew if visiting Canada
View attachment 13506
I think Dag is intimating that the standard pressed from sheet K1 could be improved upon. Thirty years ago, when Cousin Ian (McCully) was running the NZ Spares Scheme, he sold me a K1 which he insisted was made of superior material the the factory originals & also recommended shortening the tangs to reduce their tendency to straighten. I recently purchased another from V3 because they are advertised as being superior material etc. Grinding the tangs of both on a bench grinder, the sparks to indicate that they are probably a reasonable grade of carbon steel adequately heat treated.
The only improvement I could suggest is to machine one out of a solid piece of high tensile steel.:)
 

A_HRD

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The other improvement would be to machine another set of slots in to your pushrod tube nuts before fitting them (total 8 slots - but 6 would probably do if you are machining them from scratch). On Twins it is often impossible to fit the K1 to a pair of slots because of fouling the rear exhaust pipe.

Peter B
Bristol, UK.
 

clevtrev

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I think Dag is intimating that the standard pressed from sheet K1 could be improved upon. Thirty years ago, when Cousin Ian (McCully) was running the NZ Spares Scheme, he sold me a K1 which he insisted was made of superior material the the factory originals & also recommended shortening the tangs to reduce their tendency to straighten. I recently purchased another from V3 because they are advertised as being superior material etc. Grinding the tangs of both on a bench grinder, the sparks to indicate that they are probably a reasonable grade of carbon steel adequately heat treated.
The only improvement I could suggest is to machine one out of a solid piece of high tensile steel.:)
Like these ? Been using one for 35 yearEnds.jpg s.
 

clevtrev

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Come on Trev' Where is the rest of it ?, There must be a Handle ??, Cheers Bill.
You already have it, simply rivet, weld or bolt on this replacement. The idea of having a spare is my philosophy of always being prepared, for example I always carried a spare tube AND a puncture outfit, thus I never had a puncture in over 40 years of Vincent riding.
 

Chris Launders

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I noticed when I first started riding that no matter what tools etc I had it was always something else that was needed, I eventually realised that if I carried none I was still in the same postion, so that's what I have done, the tools in the Vincent tool tray are there because they were in when I got it and the one in my Brough 11.50 is an 18mm plug spanner as I needed it to help get the carb set up 10 years ago.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Chris, Does this mean you never break down ?, Or do you have a good phone and lots of friends with Vans. Me, I carry as much as I can get in the tank bag !!, Just in case !!. Cheers Bill.
 

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