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H: Hubs, Wheels and Tyres Rear Sprocket

Peter Holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
A good few years ago I purchased a standard chain width aluminium rear sprocket (or more likely Duralumin) which proved to excellent in all respects, I am fairly certain that I purchased this sprocket from Conway Motors, either from Chas or Colin, does anyone know of a current supplier of these, I think someone did mention the Chain and Sprocket guy that used to do the big events like Kempton Park etc. but sadly he is no longer with us.
 

DDOC

New Website User
VOC Member
I run a Scottoiler on all my bikes, Rapide, CBR 1000F Honda, Ducati ST4S, Yamaha Tracer MT07. I use whatever oil I have handy, probably what is left in the new can after an oil change. My units are old style, non-electronic and I adjust them in a similar fashion to Peter. I usually get well over 10,000 +miles from a chain with little or no mainteance other than topping up the resevoir and the occasional chain adjustment, almost fit and forget. The sprockets kast well also. If you have more than one bike you can have the minimalist plastic tubing left in place on each bike and easily move the resevoir from one bike to another.
Thinking about fitting a scottoiler to my rapide. Where have you mounted yours on the bike?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Peter Holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
This information might not help you very much, but here goes, Scottoiler recommend fitting the programme screen on the handlebars, as I already have a Satnav mounted on the handlebars along with the rest of the essential stuff I did not want anything else up there, and anyway once it is set up you really do not need to fiddle with it to much, so I mounted the screen on the rear carrier using a simple bracket, I also mounted the reservoir on the rear carrier frame close to the tool tray, but allowing the tool tray to be slid out from the opposite side, the oil dispenser quill I fitted to the brake torque arm. Eddy just beat me to a reply when I was halfway through my response. Looks like Eddy has done a good job of his, I wanted to fit the reservoir in a static location, for no good reason really, I just did not want the reservoir and associated connections bobbing up and down with the rear frame, I would imagine both positions work equally well.
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
This information might not help you very much, but here goes, Scottoiler recommend fitting the programme screen on the handlebars, as I already have a Satnav mounted on the handlebars along with the rest of the essential stuff I did not want anything else up there, and anyway once it is set up you really do not need to fiddle with it to much, so I mounted the screen on the rear carrier using a simple bracket, I also mounted the reservoir on the rear carrier frame close to the tool tray, but allowing the tool tray to be slid out from the opposite side, the oil dispenser quill I fitted to the brake torque arm. Eddy just beat me to a reply when I was halfway through my response. Looks like Eddy has done a good job of his, I wanted to fit the reservoir in a static location, for no good reason really, I just did not want the reservoir and associated connections bobbing up and down with the rear frame, I would imagine both positions work equally well.
My installation is the original vacuum operated version. The electronic Scottoiler gets good revues and I believe there are several other companies offering electronic chain oilers so they must be a good idea. Whatever method is used to deliver oil to the chain, some regularly is definitely better than non.
Coincidentaly in the late 1980's when I was at university doing my degree course I designed and built an electronic chainoiler. I made a small peristaltic pump. (Simplistically it is three rollers going around in a planetary fashion, squeezing a plastic pipe. You've probably seen a larger version on a kidney dialysis machine.) I used a stepper to drive the pump and triggered it by mounting a sensor near the teeth on the rear sprocket. It was only triggered when the bike was moving and the faster the teeth went past the faster the stepper motor turned the pump. It worked fine on the test bench but I never got around to fitting it on a bike. Ironically my bike at the time was an 75/6 BMW .... shaft drive.:)
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
What happend with the Degree.
Dear Vincent,
I had meningitis half way throught the degree course and had a year out recovering. When I'd recovered I went back and finished the course and got a Degree of Bachelor of Education . That enabled me to get a teaching post. I taught Design and I.T. to 11 - 14 year olds.
 

Simon

New Website User
VOC Member
A good few years ago I purchased a standard chain width aluminium rear sprocket (or more likely Duralumin) which proved to excellent in all respects, I am fairly certain that I purchased this sprocket from Conway Motors, either from Chas or Colin, does anyone know of a current supplier of these, I think someone did mention the Chain and Sprocket guy that used to do the big events like Kempton Park etc. but sadly he is no longer with us.
I think his wife Jane continues to run the business.
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
I like the cover over the lower chain run. What is the source?

Paul
The rear chain guard is quite good on my Vincent Rapide but a little project I had in mind for quite a while was to devise a small guard to protect the bottom run of the chain. An Ariel Square Four I bought in 1969 had a small guard for the bottom chain run that thought was a good idea.
Quite a few modern bikes have plastic chain guards, they are light and don’t need painting. I had an offcut of black plastic drainpipe in the shed so I thought I would experiment with that. I cut off a short piece and warmed it with a hot air gun and then gradually squashed it in the vice between two lengths of wood to see how easily it would form. The first photograph shows how it turned out. Next, I cut a piece of pipe and slotted it lengthwise. I warmed it and when it became pliable I flattened it out. I found a piece of wood of a thickness the same as I wanted for the inside width of the guard and rounded one edge and then used this as a former to bend the hot plastic over to give me a “U” shaped piece. I cut this to the length required and used a piece of thin stainless steel sheet to attach it to torque arm of the right-hand rear brake. The other two photographs taken from the left and right-hand sides, show the guard fitted.
chain_guard1.png

chain_guard2.png
chain_guard3.png
 
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highbury731

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have been thinking about making such a guard for the lower chain run, for my Rapide. Plastic might be a good idea, because the lower run tends to flap about.
My BSA Super Rocket had a chain guard with an inner face which covered the entire gap between wheel and gearbox. That made a huge difference to chain life and maintenance. I also fitted a pipe from oil tank breather to the rear sprocket, and I hardly ever needed to oil the chain.
Also, I had a Suzuki GS450 for a while, and bought a Peter Furlong full chain-case. It made a huge difference to chain life - maybe treble the previous.
Paul
 

Monkeypants

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
BSA offered these as an option on the A10 Super Rocket and possibly earlier A10s.
My 63 SR has it and it is excellent. There is no chain oiler, just a slight weep from the trans that works it's way onto the chain. A standard chain and sprockets fully housed and lubricated with gear oil lwill last a long, long time.
It seems good enough to be a Vincent idea.
I believe some Ariels had this feature as well.
With the BSA, when removing the wheel, the chaincase, chain and rear sprocket all stay put, the wheel drops away.
The rear wheel and tire stay very clean.
Makes you wonder why that system wasn't adopted as standard in the motorcycle industry. Perhaps cost. The tin work is quite involved to allow for pivoting of the swing arm and sliding the sprocket for chain adjustment.

Glen
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
Just to bring some Christmas humor to this post........ I refer to Eddy's earlier post/pics number 22, How has Eddy managed to get his "Nuts on the outside"........???
Hi Greg,
Not sure which nuts you mean on the outside. Whichever they are they have been on the outside since I built the bike from bits 15 or so years ago.
 

Vincent Brake

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The rear chain guard is quite good on my Vincent Rapide but a little project I had in mind for quite a while was to devise a small guard to protect the bottom run of the chain. An Ariel Square Four I bought in 1969 had a small guard for the bottom chain run that thought was a good idea.
Quite a few modern bikes have plastic chain guards, they are light and don’t need painting. I had an offcut of black plastic drainpipe in the shed so I thought I would experiment with that. I cut off a short piece and warmed it with a hot air gun and then gradually squashed it in the vice between two lengths of wood to see how easily it would form. The first photograph shows how it turned out. Next, I cut a piece of pipe and slotted it lengthwise. I warmed it and when it became pliable I flattened it out. I found a piece of wood of a thickness the same as I wanted for the inside width of the guard and rounded one edge and then used this as a former to bend the hot plastic over to give me a “U” shaped piece. I cut this to the length required and used a piece of thin stainless steel sheet to attach it to torque arm of the right-hand rear brake. The other two photographs taken from the left and right-hand sides, show the guard fitted.
View attachment 39183

View attachment 39184
View attachment 39185
best idea ever, only seen on a Bruff before
 

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