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H: Hubs, Wheels and Tyres Rear Sprocket

Peter Holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
A good few years ago I purchased a standard chain width aluminium rear sprocket (or more likely Duralumin) which proved to excellent in all respects, I am fairly certain that I purchased this sprocket from Conway Motors, either from Chas or Colin, does anyone know of a current supplier of these, I think someone did mention the Chain and Sprocket guy that used to do the big events like Kempton Park etc. but sadly he is no longer with us.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
People making sprockets are not too hard to find 5/8X1/4 are cheaper and 5/8X1/4 gearbox sprockets can be found at spares co.
Main reason for turning an adaptor and filling workshop with swarf was so I could us MX sprockets down below what is possible on a standard drum and that combined with a 22 gearbox pumps the ratio back up to around 3.5 overall and give you a graduated variable for circuits ( NB there are two ratios if you fit one of Bob newbys belt drives see threads on here for details on belt ratios)
 

stumpy lord

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
A good few years ago I purchased a standard chain width aluminium rear sprocket (or more likely Duralumin) which proved to excellent in all respects, I am fairly certain that I purchased this sprocket from Conway Motors, either from Chas or Colin, does anyone know of a current supplier of these, I think someone did mention the Chain and Sprocket guy that used to do the big events like Kempton Park etc. but sadly he is no longer with us.
HI,
sprockets are still in business run by his partner.
phone number 01386 83134 astroprox@email.msn.com
 

Robert Watson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
My experience with Alloy rear sprockets is that they run 10,000 miles. At 10, 001 miles they like to shred all over the rear rim!

If you run serious hi miles I do have in stock nitride hardened steel rear sprockets for 5 20 chain and also still re ring the front sprockets (if the hub is good) with a case hardened ring. There are some of these running well over 20,000 miles. Coupled with a decent O ring chain it makes maintenance back there required at much longer distances.

Non of this is inexpensive but when you get tired of changing out chain and sprockets it is an alternative.

I know also being on the west coast of Canada ups the cost of delivery.
 

Peter Holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I think the obvious answer for longevity of the chain and sprockets is lubrication, but not any old lubrication, the standard built in oiler is not overly successful due to the unavoidable changes in viscosity, the boiling of the chain in Linklife in a no longer needed kitchen appliance deep fat frier has been consigned to history, the aerosol cans of various types might save the chain running bone dry I suppose, but that is about the only good thing I could say about them. For me the complete answer is the latest offering from Scottoiler, fully electronic and programmable, I set mine to the maximum amount of flow before contamination starts to be evidenced on the rear wheel and tyre, just a few spots mind, then just back it of a little until it runs clean, perfect. The Yamaha TR1 (which for me is a modernish copy of a Vincent, Series E maybe) has the best solution for a chain driven bike, a fully enclosed rear chain running in a molybdenum disulphide oil, good for 100,000 miles apparently, I do own one, but have not managed to do 100,000 miles, always to busy riding the Vincent.
 
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bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Carl Hungness already tried, with mixed results, to fit a "maintenance-free" belt drive, such as on my 100 hp Buell XB12S. (I call it a poor man's Egli.)
 

Peter Holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I am not a great fan of rear drive belts, I was out riding with my cousin a few years back, he was riding his 1340 Harley Dynarod something, a stone from the road got trapped between the rear sprocket and the belt, punched hole through the belt and it had to be replaced, pretty expensive job, and quite a lot of stripping down and rebuilding to fit it.
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
......... For me the complete answer is the latest offering from Scottoiler, fully electronic and programmable, I set mine to the maximum amount of flow before contamination starts to be evidenced on the rear wheel and tyre, just a few spots mind, then just back it of a little until it runs clean, perfect. .....
I run a Scottoiler on all my bikes, Rapide, CBR 1000F Honda, Ducati ST4S, Yamaha Tracer MT07. I use whatever oil I have handy, probably what is left in the new can after an oil change. My units are old style, non-electronic and I adjust them in a similar fashion to Peter. I usually get well over 10,000 +miles from a chain with little or no mainteance other than topping up the resevoir and the occasional chain adjustment, almost fit and forget. The sprockets kast well also. If you have more than one bike you can have the minimalist plastic tubing left in place on each bike and easily move the resevoir from one bike to another.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I thought a new type of chain had just been announced that was a long life maintenance free design much better than even o ring jobs?
I may have seen it in a dealer mag I get
but since I lost control of chain sizes about the same time as tire nomenclature I have no idea what sizes they are being produced in :mad: Jeeze I have enough time trying to find a link clip that fits! from computer plugs to headlamp sizes why are there no industry wide standards anymore?
(said IKB gazing at railway lines:rolleyes:)
 

Bill Cannon

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I thought a new type of chain had just been announced that was a long life maintenance free design much better than even o ring jobs?
I may have seen it in a dealer mag I get
but since I lost control of chain sizes about the same time as tire nomenclature I have no idea what sizes they are being produced in :mad: Jeeze I have enough time trying to find a link clip that fits! from computer plugs to headlamp sizes why are there no industry wide standards anymore?
(said IKB gazing at railway lines:rolleyes:)
BMW now offer a "diamond coated" chain as an option for S1000 models and standard on the new M1000.
Eternal life assured!!! About £500 wow.
Cheers Bill
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Actually I think it was this innovation
they are like most funded devlopment firms a bunch of young brainwashed green acolytes but while dreaming about their push bikes they may have something, of course motorcycles would not enter their heads, but chain manufacturers are more hard headed so one can hope
 

Monkeypants

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
With a common sealed x ring chain on there and some of Robert's hardened sprockets one can do 20,000 miles, easy, with very little adjusting. When the chain finally starts needing adjustment it's time to throw it away as the seals have now gone, that's why measureable wear started.
Or, as described on a Sportbike forum " I see what you mean Dude. Those little black rubber things are sticking out like an old man's nose hairs!"

You can do this mileage with just a bit of chain wax spray every few hundred miles.
The wax tends to stay on so the rear wheel stays quite clean , not forever grimy as when a chain is flinging oil everywhere.
This long life, low maintenance setup leaves us with spare time to trim nose hairs.
There's a sales slogan in there somewhere!

Glen
 
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