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E: Engine Comet Mongrel


Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Well.... I ordered up a relatively cheap hand pump/water reservoir contraption complete with gauges for pressure testing plumbing. The pump part is basically the same as the hand pump on a hydraulic jack or press. It goes to 800 PSI, but easier to control than a pressure washer. I figured it was worth the investment, because...if it works (without any drama) it is an art form I would like to explore.
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Cast your vote.
A.. unusual back yard engineering.
B.. He has completely lost his last few remains marbles.

26088
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
400 psi ! hells teeth, thats 100 times more than a Vincents oil pressure when cold :p
Whats next braided oil lines?
 

Robert Watson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Where does 400 psi come from, that's a dial indicator (or perhaps more correctly a digital indicator) nIn suspect there just to watch the expansion!! likely at well less than 3 psi
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The plan for the indicator was to get an idea of how much expansion one stroke of the pump would produce, but didn't end up using it. After priming the pump and getting most of the air out of the tank, I gave the pump a couple of strokes, but the gauge on the tank didn't show any pressure. Long story short, it took less pressure than the gauge would indicate to begin expanding the tank. Doubt if the gauge is very accurate. Anyway, it turned out ok. The aluminum was annealed prior to bending it over the buck, so that would have made it easier to form at lower pressure. When done, the whole mess was put in the oven at 200F or so for about an hour and the tank popped up just like the indicator in the turkey. The Cerrobend runs off the aluminum like water and any bits remaining were just wiped off with a rag. It did its job, the sides and rear of the tank didn't budge, so it still fits the bike.

2610126102
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I love this kind of thinking
Thanks... me too, especially when it doesn't end in tears. The only catch is now I need to get the other side to match. Initially I was just going to use a side cover, but now that has morphed (if successful) into a tool/electrical box. I welded together a mirror image of the oil tank and installed a 1/4 NPT bung so it can be submerged into the cerrobend. If all goes well, I'll cut it apart afterwards and then use one of those Quik-Latches to hold the lid on. Hope that I can shrink down a lip on the box so the lid will seal over top. The threads in the bung can be drilled out to accommodate wiring to whatever ends up inside there.
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Submerged the toolbox into the molten Cerrobend.... the box was pre-filled with water, but given the density of the Cerrobend I had a couple of weights handy to hold it down until things solidified. Slightly miscalculated the difference in density so the weights weren't enough....had to hold it down by hand which added to the excitement. Just for the record, this time I used the telltale on the gauge and it registered considerably higher than what I previously thought. Probably suffered from target fixation while staring at the bulging oil tank. Cut the box apart and welded in a flange as I don't have any flanging tools that will handle the gauge of the alloy. Still far from finished, but slowly making headway. The reflection in the lid makes it look a little wonky, but it turned out ok. Not perfect, but I keep telling myself if its perfect, it'll look like it was stamped out by a robot as opposed to being hand made.
Hydroform pressure.jpgTool box.jpg
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
There is something to be said for "oil in frame" setups. Finally got all the bungs and mounts welded into the oil tank. No "stack of dimes" welds on the bungs, but will be oil tight. Welding small round things and maintaining the correct TIG torch angle is challenging. Welded a threaded boss onto the inside of the tool box cover and installed a quick release on the backside.
Oil tank bungs.jpgTool box cover release.jpg

Quick latch.jpg
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Have you seen my welding ?, It took me 4 goes to seal an Oil Tank, Petrol must be really hard to seal.
But always wanted to try, Maybe one day ?.

Cheers Bill.
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thanks for that Bill. I hadn't seen that one before. Those roll over dies and the dent removal doodad are interesting. There isn't an english wheel in my future so going to try forming the tank in sections using female bucks or forms. As for shaping the alloy into the buck I'll have to see what works. Air driven planishing hammer, hydro forming, or I have an unused hot tub in the back yard.... just need to source the gelignite.
Currently I'm fabricating a belly pan...filled a piece of 1/2" tubing with that cerrobend and formed it into a buck to use for rounding over the edges (the old fashioned way). Don't have a tubing bender and needed a really sharp bend anyway. Currently the pan looks large enough to hold the entire oil capacity of the bike, plus the big end and at least half a connecting rod.

 

Oldhaven

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have built aluminum boats, but it took me a lot longer than a millisecond to make the shape. I have wondered if this technique might be a good way to make a very light sidecar body. The wraps get epoxied so the whole thing is amazingly rigid and the frame weighs less than 18 pounds. Sorry about going so far off track Cyborg...


baidarka004.jpg.
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I've been looking for a sidecar for a different project, but haven't found one locally. Making one (something like a Steib) has been on my bucket list for a long time, but not sure I'll get to it. There is a box of Clecos sitting here that desperately need to be put into service, so will likely rivet rather than wrap. That method would work just fine, but might be inclined to use G/flex so it has a bit of give.

Test fitting the belly pan. Wonder if Roy Bacon would be offended....

belly pan test fit.jpg
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Yes..... in a previous post I more or less did confess that they wouldn't look out of place on a gay gypsy's caravan (posts 370-374). As mentioned, I may change them, but for now will focus on things that are preventing this thing from rolling down the road under its own steam. Its just an aesthetics/PITA to clean thing as the pegs are firmly bolted to a steel gusset that is welded to the frame.
 

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