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E: Engine Comet Mongrel


davidd

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VOC Member
Anything that does the job is good. I used the Beverly shear for most cutting and a small rotary ratchet shear for the small trimming jobs.

David
 

ClassicBiker

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VOC Member
If I understand what you are saying, that is pretty much what option 2 is... although I don't know what you mean by a caulking tool. I have enough Cerrobend to make a female die and also have a decent sized hydraulic press. I ordered up enough alloy for quite a number of attempts so hopefully one way or another I'll come up with something other than fodder for yard art.
A fellow I know actually used cement to make a female buck to form wheel arches for an MG. It sounds bizarre, but his work is absolutely amazing.


Even if you aren't a MG fan, this is worth a look.

https://www.mgexp.com/phorum/read.php?1,3513512
Actually, I'm a member on that forum as well. I have a '70 BGT, same name and avatar there.:)

100_1460cropped.jpg
Rather than hitting the metal directly with a hammer, you use an intermediary tool to transfer the blow. The name comes from boat builders. To caulk the seams of a boat by driving rope (hemp) in between the planks then coating with pitch (tar) to seal up the joints water tight. I'll post some picture of some tools I have.
Making soft tooling from Cerrobend would be good. Just have to account for material thickness if you use you buck as a core for making the die. How would you do that? Layer up tape or cloth and smooth out the ridges in the die afterwards?
Steven
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I get your "drift". I've done my share of caulking boat seams and still own the damn thing. 1947 Chris Craft U22. I bought a cheap set of drift/roll pin punches for the air hammer that I can modify for that purpose.... either using them with the air hammer or just a normal hammer.
Accounting for the material thickness will be a little tricky. Bouncing around a couple of ideas, but focusing on getting the panels for the oil tank and side cover formed with the bucks that I have. There is an outfit in the UK that uses Cerrobend for stamping out small batches of panels, but I'm assuming they make a panel the old fashioned way and then use that to form the dies.
 

Cyborg

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VOC Member
The first attempt was a dismal failure, except I learned that (for my skill level) I was trying to shape too large a radius and the amount of material that I was folding around the radius was way too wide. No way I could shrink the metal that much. Then tried putting a 1/4" radius on the flip side of the bucks and trimmed the panel so that there was about 1/2" extra to fold around the corner. Just have to figure out a simple way to put a bit of a convex curve on the outside of the panel so it looks a little better. I suppose hydroforming would work, but setup would consume a lot of time.
This was done with a basic body hammer. I ordered up some leather for the face of the home made (wood) slapper. When searching the net for images of slappers, it turns out that word has more than one meaning.
Side cover.jpgSide cover 2.jpg
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
You should be very pleased with this. It is about as fast as one can learn.

DSCN2768.jpg

"T" dolly, a Covell slapper and a Fournier slapper. I think the plastic hammers are fine as long as they are working well. I tend to have a lot of extra wood an metal hammers that I have picked up over the years so I can re shape them to what I need. Fournier, Covell and Tin Man still sell this stuff.

You also might experiment with the order you do the bends in. Sometimes starting at the tough part that needs a lot of shrinking will give you more space to shrink the extra metal into if you have not already folded the easy bends over. When doing the easy rolls with the slapper you should continue the shrinking as you leave or approach the corners where most of the shrinking is happening. You want to shrink your extra metal over the largest area possible. If you think of it like you need to put darts or pleats in the metal and hammer them flat (making the metal thicker), then you need room to make three or four small darts instead of on big one, which is probably what happened in the first try. You did the right thing by broadening the corners to shrink the metal over a larger area.

Also, you can put darts or tucks in aluminum with a tucking tool.

Tucking Tool.jpg
The tucking tool allows you to make uniform corrugations, which can be hammered down making the metal thicker. It is usually used on bigger panels. But, thinking about how many tucks it would take to shrink the area you are working on will help you not to bite off more than you can chew.

Nicely Done!

David
 

Cyborg

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VOC Member
Thanks David. The first one had me thinking this was a bad idea and wondering what I was going to do with the rest of the aluminum. Maybe a fish cleaning table for the boat.... I watched a video of a fellow using one of those tucking tools and it gave me the feeling that I should avoid any projects that require the use of one. I do need a few of those T shaped dollies in your photo.
 

vibrac

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VOC Member
I remember seeing a film fifty years ago at engineering college about explosive forming based on removable formers mounted on top of a 500cc motorcycle engine barrel petrol was introduced and a spark plug attached when all was set up one bang formed the deep draw shape. Another good idea I never saw again.
 

Cyborg

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VOC Member
I posted this picture before.... its a Ducati Shock rocker with a home made fork. Not sure why I chose this system other than I had the rocker already and it looks like an interesting setup. I had either forgotten or never noticed that Harris used a similar system years earlier (1984) than the Monster it came off. Does anyone out there know if Harris came up with this system or who did?

Fork and Rocker.jpg

Harris KZ750.jpg
 

Cyborg

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VOC Member
After reading about belt tension on Oldhaven's thread, I spent the day "fettling" the gearbox adjusting slots to allow for a little more slack. Thankfully they just needed some cleaning up to allow full travel. Almost finished the rearsets. Not sure what to think of them. They appear to function as intended, but look like they belong on that Gypsy caravan someone mentioned. The other side is even more garish, because it has to hold the master cylinder. The plates also hold the swingarm pivot shaft captive.
Rearsets shifter.jpg
 

Chris Launders

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VOC Member
They do indeed look garish, and the weight saving is minimal plus causes weak points, better to mill some of the interior thinner if you're that desperate to save weight.
 

Black Flash

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VOC Member
I love go faster hole's and after all they are period. I doubt a lot of back yard tuners [I don't know the expression used in the 50s and 60s] had a milling machine at hand.
Go on and put some more holes in.
Also wire locking makes a lot of sense and looks cool to.
A cafe racer without go faster holes just isn't the real thing.
Bernd
 

Cyborg

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VOC Member
They do indeed look garish, and the weight saving is minimal plus causes weak points, better to mill some of the interior thinner if you're that desperate to save weight.
Well thats what happens when you start making something without a plan. Although I'm trying to keep the weight of the bike down, I wasn't really worried too much about the rearsets. Its a bit of a cake decorating exercise as I'm trying for some sort of vintage look and I think the new anodized CNC stuff looks out of place. Not concerned about weak spots, the foot pegs are bolted through fairly robust steel tabs welded to the frame. I know its supposed to be form follows function, but this one is somehow going to look the way I want and screw the rules. Having said all that drivel, I may change then to something more like the Harris bike above. They'll stay on there for now and I'll see how they actually function. The lever on the shift shaft is short and I'm wondering about that.
 
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Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I like them, But a begger to clean in those holes, I have found !. Cheers Bill.
I knew you would like the holes and yes... as I was drilling them..... these are going to be a pain. However, in order for them to get dirty, I have to actually ride the thing.... so looking forward to it. Plus I can have my lovely apprentice assist me.
Bride at work.jpg
 

Bill Thomas

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VOC Member
Looks like you and Oldhaven will beat me to the road, Can't wait to see them finished.
Cheers Bill.
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I love go faster hole's and after all they are period. I doubt a lot of back yard tuners [I don't know the expression used in the 50s and 60s] had a milling machine at hand.
Go on and put some more holes in.
Also wire locking makes a lot of sense and looks cool to.
A cafe racer without go faster holes just isn't the real thing.
Bernd
This thing is supposed to look like some sort of Cafe Racer from back in the day, although I'm not really sure what that term means anymore. There are some frightening bikes out there that supposedly fall into that category. To really look the part, I would have to extract the CBX 550 brakes from the wheels and lace them to alloy rims and as much as I would like to do that, the clock is ticking. Plus it will have turn signals, fenders. and DOT approved tires, so that excludes me from the current trend. As for the safety wire.... just getting to the point where I could actually wire something would be wonderful. Assemble, disassemble, fettle, reassemble, repeat.
Safety wire..jpg
 

davidd

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VOC Member
David Tompkins called yesterday and asked me what the racer weighed. I told him 280 lbs. His weight out at 294 lbs. He wanted to know where the 14 lbs was that I got rid of. I had just added more lightness than he did.

David
 

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