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E: Engine Comet Mongrel



MartynG

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
David Tompkins called yesterday and asked me what the racer weighed. I told him 280 lbs. His weight out at 294 lbs. He wanted to know where the 14 lbs was that I got rid of. I had just added more lightness than he did.

David
Helium in the tyres?????
 

Cyborg

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VOC Member
I have no idea what this thing will weigh. Hopefully sub 400 as one of the goals is to have something light and nimble for dodging traffic. I'm thinking the local licensing branch has gone back to selling licenses. ( apparently there were some rogue employees doing that). To really knock off the pounds, I would have to go a different route with the swingarm. The frame is reasonably light, (although never bothered to weigh it), but there is an abundance of bracing on the swingarm. I'd also have to swap out the 3 cast iron brake rotors!
If I had utilized the hours that I've spent fettling so far on collecting pop cans, I could have bought a KTM 390 RC.
 

Cyborg

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VOC Member
Still some fitting and drilling for the filler and bungs left to do. I think the oil tank will be about 2.5 litres, so run with about 2 litres? The belt cover still has to have another piece made so there is a little more room for the clutch and a place to mount the round Vincent access cover.Oil tank and covers.jpg
 

Cyborg

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VOC Member
Got though about 3.5 feet of weld without blowing any holes in the cover or setting myself on fire. I'm not sure starting with alloy sheet is a good way to teach yourself how to TIG. Just ran about 2.5 inches at a time to keep the heat from warping the cover plus I suck at feeding the rod and dipping at the same time. Welds will be ground down and the cover polished. Not sure if I'm going to use that access cover over the crank pulley (for timing marks) The thing in the middle is a push button latch which will hold the cover on along with some locating dowels.... at least that's the plan.

2584425845
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Given the fact that the cover can be removed with a push of a button, the access covers for the clutch adjuster and the timing marks have become sort of redundant. I like the access cover for the clutch, the one over the drive pulley not so much. I may just replace it with a simple alloy disc.

25914
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The location of my oil tank and lack of real estate means that I don't have a convenient filler cap to peek into to determine if all is well with return oil flow. Thinking of a site glass mounted in the return line. I have searched around the interwebs and there are options available, but thought I'd ask if anyone here ((with specials or other brands) uses one or has any suggestions.
 

Cyborg

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VOC Member
I also thought about just buying the glass and making my own. Maybe its a goofy idea, but it might be nice to incorporate it into the top of the fuel tank somehow. Don't think another 12" of return line would aggravate anything. Engine has valve seals and new style rocker feed bolts, so shouldn't be a problem.

 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I would think a tell tail plunger as in the Triumph timing cover would be best assuming the Vincent pump has enough energy to lift a gram .of alloy . I think a sight glass would be difficult to see after a bit.
 

ericg

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VOC Member
I also thought about just buying the glass and making my own. Maybe its a goofy idea, but it might be nice to incorporate it into the top of the fuel tank somehow. Don't think another 12" of return line would aggravate anything. Engine has valve seals and new style rocker feed bolts, so shouldn't be a problem.

I've used a short length of clear hose on the return line as per Egli practice, I can see it while riding.
It keeps my mind in peace as I have a Conway valve on the feed line and I'd have no clue if it fails until disaster. I check oil circulation when I start the engine.
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have a couple of those plungers. NOS Norton, but they are fairly long and look like they would be annoying to modify. Perhaps the Triumph ones are more compact. The idea behind the sight glass was to be able to see what's going on while riding, If it was a plunger that tripped a switch, then an idiot light mounted between the gauges would do. I haven't looked around, but assume that pump would only register around 3psi give or take depending on temperature?
 

Oldhaven

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VOC Member
I have an Egli style return on the DD frame I am working on and I found a reinforced clear polyurethane tubing called Urebrade for it. It is UV and oil resistant and good for 175F temps. The braid helps keep it from collapsing. The only problem is you have to buy 10 feet at $1.24/ft for 1/4 ID and $1.97/ft for 3/8 ID. Since you are doing the frame and fuel and oil tanks your own way anyway you could probably find a way to put it in rider's sight in the return line.

26063
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Right now making an alloy fuel tank seems like even more of a daunting task. The oil tank has been TIG welded together with just the drain bung so far. Unfortunately the outside face of the tank is slightly concave. The original thought was to have it convex (similar to an older Triumph tank), but for simplicity and expediency just decided to leave it flat. It was during the welding process that it became slightly concave.... so now back to the original plan. The interesting part is that there is no room on the sides or the back of the tank for expansion because of frame tubes and suspension. Can't expand outwards anywhere but on the front or it will no longer fit.
 

chankly bore

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Is water under a little pressure a possible solution? I only ask because I have recently seen a beautiful tapered Honda exhaust made this way. It started off as two seam welded bits of plate. The maker used a high pressure washer, probably more pressure than you'd need.
 


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