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Where Are You Now? Stuart Jenkinson -"Vinnylonglegs"


Jez Nemeth

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
750,000+ miles on a Vincent, of Bike and Sun tours fame. Talking over latest Comet project bike with a good friend, Chris Horell, on a brand new Africa Twin (in those days 1992) who since traveling with Stuart, then went on to travel extensively himself, Is interested to know if he his well, and still traveling albeit not on his beloved Vincent. Please pass on my details, pm me, to put these two in contact again- Many thanks.
 
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Graham Smith

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VOC Forum Administrator
VOC Forum Moderator
I'm pretty sure Stuart's no longer a member of the Club, and hasn't been for a number of years.

I think he gave up his membership soon after he sold VinnyLongLegs.
 

Jez Nemeth

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thanks for swift reply Graham. Worth a try, maybe another club member or Vinnie owner might have kept in contact with him over the years?
 

Jez Nemeth

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
He is quite a character by all accounts, Chris met him met him many times in Greece, on that very 'functional' twin headlight model D of his. He was still conducting tours there, and in the Balkans just before Yugoslavia erupted.
 

Graham Smith

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VOC Forum Administrator
VOC Forum Moderator
It's probably all been restored to original by now nobody wants non standard more history lost
I'm pretty sure that once it sold, all the non-standard farings ended up on eBay, so I suspect it's been put back to standard trim.
 

Ian Savage

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I've just spoken to Stuart and he's well, he thanks you for your comments, he has very fond memories of the Bike and Sun tours but admits he can't remember all the names of the riders he took.
He wishes everyone well in the Vincent community.
PS, he doesn't do e-mail or internet.
Ian S
 

Jez Nemeth

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thank you Ian! I'll let Chris know directly ... he'll be delighted to hear he's good. Told me some superb stories of Stuart's mishaps and adventures. Often forget names, but sure Stuart would remember a face. Thank you again -appreciated.
 
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Sakura

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
It's his bike, he can turn it into a paperweight if he wants. That fairing was damn ugly too.

I have many modifications on my bike that I have spent hours lovingly fitting. I am sure that any new owner would throw them in the bin and build it how they want.
Absolutely right Peter. Whoever he is, he paid for it which gives him the right to do what he likes with it. I'm sure he isn't interested in other people's view points anyway.
 

Jez Nemeth

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Just thinking that perhaps there's a good case for an honorary membership here for Stuart? Type of story that really promotes the marque positively...just a though... Agree with Pete on fairing issue though -marmite.
26173
 
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peter holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I seem to remember that Stuart didn't like the Series D upper frame member arrangement and converted it back to a Series C arrangement, with 750,000 miles on the clock Stuart might be a good person to ask about the Girdraulic Fork behavioural problems, especially as at some point he was using two front disc brakes, which apparently exacerbates the problem.
 

macvette

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
So, now this twit will only have a cookie cutter D just like all the others. What an idiot! By this type of reasoning Gunga Din, the Neros, Dearden's, etc. should all be returned to "original". BAH!
I have an open D. Steering stem mod, roller bearing concentrics, hydraulic steering damper and BTH ( modern type). There are many more "cookie cutter" series Cs than Ds.
 

mercurycrest

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I suppose its like re touching an old master to make it look like it was originally but then in this case there are thousands of original identical old masters and also nobody would suggest mending the bullet holes and burns in a battle flag or pressure washing and polishing stonehenge.
Right, and Vinny Longlegs is a well known, documented 750,000 mile Vincent that was a sort of high mileage battle flag for all to see, bullet holes and ugly fairing included. It should have been left as it was.
 

Sakura

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Right, and Vinny Longlegs is a well known, documented 750,000 mile Vincent that was a sort of high mileage battle flag for all to see, bullet holes and ugly fairing included. It should have been left as it was.
So at what stage in a bike's history should be kept in aspic forever, and who gets to decide? Most bikes have many incarnations. I customised my Rocket Goldie in 1969, bought it back in a dilapidated state in 1989 and rebuilt it, first in Clubman's trim, then in touring trim. It wasn't standard when I bought it in 1969. Which was correct?
 

macvette

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
So at what stage in a bike's history should be kept in aspic forever, and who gets to decide? Most bikes have many incarnations. I customised my Rocket Goldie in 1969, bought it back in a dilapidated state in 1989 and rebuilt it, first in Clubman's trim, then in touring trim. It wasn't standard when I bought it in 1969. Which was correct?
I think that if you have time, resources and commitment to find a bike, it is your decision as to it's final state. The only thing I would add is that at the end of the process, either recommissioning, rebuilt, or completely restored, you should ride it as it was intended
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
So at what stage in a bike's history should be kept in aspic forever, and who gets to decide? Most bikes have many incarnations. I customised my Rocket Goldie in 1969, bought it back in a dilapidated state in 1989 and rebuilt it, first in Clubman's trim, then in touring trim. It wasn't standard when I bought it in 1969. Which was correct?
Only you know that :D (and your fans!)
 

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