• Welcome to the website of the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club.

    Should you have any questions relating to the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club, or Vincent H.R.D. motorcycles in general, please contact Graham Smith, Hon. Editor and Webmaster by calling 07977 001 025 or please CLICK HERE.

    You are unrecognised, and therefore, only have VERY restricted access to the many features of this website.

    If you have previously registered to use this forum, you should log in now. CLICK HERE.

    If you have never registered to use this website before, please CLICK HERE.

C: Clutch Refreshing Vincent Twin Clutch seals and pieces


litnman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Bill,
No, the G3 isn't bent, it's new and between centers the bearing journal run true.
This tells me the C20s are not true.
 

craig

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I received my new C14 from VOC . Very excitedly I unpackaged and selected one from the package, screwed a 406 in to the threads and found that it would not go all the way in , kinda close , but shy a couple threads.
I got out another and found the same thing, not able to fully thread..........and if you tried to force further the threads on the 406 were damaged and would not extract well at all.

26041
 

craig

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
So I got out my C27 plate and wanted to see if full thread was not required.
To my disappointment, C27 would hold tight not even close.

I have not had time to check much further, however one new C14 will not allow even half of a 406 to thread in.



26042
 

craig

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I checked another new C14 (#4 out of the package) and find that it does indeed fully accept a 406 screw.
And it will hold C27 "clutch spring ring" tight as needed.

26043
 

greg brillus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
As mentioned before, the screws don't actually need to be that long, it's only so you can start them against the springs/outer ring plate. This is not normally too difficult to do even when the screws are cut a bit shorter. Once you start to reassemble the outer parts you will wish the screws were only about 3 threads long, as the procedure for setting up the outer plate so it runs with minimal wobble can be somewhat "time consuming". I gave up swapping springs around in favor of placing shim washers in the right spot to minimize this problem. But there are actually many hidden things that can cause this, and some of them are not that obvious.
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The needle roller thrust race conversion should stop the outer plate lifting skewed unless there is something seriously wrong. At £68 from the Spares Company and about half of that from me it is not a too expensive, or complicated, job. I always make sure that that the central screw of each group of three is long enough to get the threads started pulling the outer plate down and after that they outer pair of each group of three can be shorter.
 

highbury731

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I am using 406 screws which are 1" long. It really makes a difference having the longer screws to help get them started. Would it be possible to deepen the threads in the C14 studs?
Paul
 

MartynG

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The needle roller thrust race conversion should stop the outer plate lifting skewed unless there is something seriously wrong. At £68 from the Spares Company and about half of that from me it is not a too expensive, or complicated, job. I always make sure that that the central screw of each group of three is long enough to get the threads started pulling the outer plate down and after that they outer pair of each group of three can be shorter.
Have you done a needle roller thrust conversion for a Burman box? I know there is such a beast available as a RE part but it has a big lump in the centre of its bearing face, making it unsuitable. And if you grind the lump the whole thing falls apart.
 

peter holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I can answer that question in part, Norman certainly did make a similar conversion for the Burman outer clutch plate, it does involve boring out the centre and replacing with the needle roller thrust race conversion, but you would have to check whether this is still available.
 

MartynG

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I can answer that question in part, Norman certainly did make a similar conversion for the Burman outer clutch plate, it does involve boring out the centre and replacing with the needle roller thrust race conversion, but you would have to check whether this is still available.
I an hoping to avoid boring the centre if possible so at a latter date I could revert back to the original setup.
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Sorry coming late to this. Peter is quite right. When I was developing the kit for twins a local member and one other asked If I could make one for a Comet. I had enough pieces made for about ten bikes but only ever sold a couple from memory. By chance I came across a box with the parts in last week while looking for something else. I will go and look them out again to refresh my memory of what was done and see if I could come up with a system that does not require boring something. With the twins I managed to design it so that nothing original was modified and I would have tried to do the same with the singles. I will see what I can find and if necessary ask the local member if I can look at his to remember what was done.
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Ok Chaps, I have now looked out the bits and pieces and this has dislodged some of the long buried memories. I can see now what I did and why. Firstly. I have two of the ali outer pressure plates and the bad news is that one has a central hole of about 14.11 mm (possibly 5/8" originally) and the other has a larger central hole, 19.95 mm (over 3/4"). Therefore, as I do not have lots of Comet parts around someone needs to tell me what they need. The conversion is relatively straight forwards and I have plenty of parts left over. The original central steel part is pressed out. I now remember that some of these had a hole worn over half way through where the push rod had been doing its best to get to freedom. This central steel part is replaced with a new design of steel insert which has a hollowed out inner face to take the needle roller thrust race and a central hole to take a locator spigot in the face of the other half of the thrust system to apply pressure to the needle roller thrust race. If anyone has a pressure plate with the smaller diameter central hole then I have checked that there is enough metal round the larger outer pieces to allow them to be machined smaller to fit into the smaller holed. Thus on the basis of these two plates there should be no need to do any boring.
With the kits for the twins I provide a new piece of silver steel, hardened at one end (the inner) and with the outer end to be cut to length to fit into the inner part of the new thrust parts. After all this time I do not remember whether the original Burman push rods are in two parts or are long enough to interface with the new parts. With the twins they are not long enough and the piece of silver steel I supply is about 7.5" long to allow the owner to cut it to length and to replace the original outer part of the pushrod.
After all this time I cannot remember what I paid for these parts but would suggest that a price of £40 per kit would be about right for a kit to include the two new steel pieces, the needle roller thrust race and a piece of silver steel if that is required. Plus P&P of course. Over to you.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
In forty years on , one will find a simple tool that every twin owner should have in his tool kit. It is simple to make , and will fit in the tool tray. I t enables the clutch to be held so that the C20 nut can be fully tightened up without having to jam any thing, and risk causing any damage.
details can be found on page220 of forty years on article 58 or M.P.H. number 470
stumpy lord
Thanks Norman, Can't think why I have never seen this after all these years.
Never liked sticking wood in the wheel.
Not so bad with my 5 spoke alloy wheels !!.
Tried it last week, With an old inner plate with 2 holes and a Car tool to hold it.
Now welded a holding flat bar with a 3/8th offset, To miss the drum.
Cheers Bill.
DSCN0231 (2).JPG
 

Top