• Welcome to the website of the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club.

    Should you have any questions relating to the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club, or Vincent H.R.D. motorcycles in general, please contact Graham Smith, Hon. Editor and Webmaster by calling 07977 001 025 or please CLICK HERE.

    You are unrecognised, and therefore, only have VERY restricted access to the many features of this website.

    If you have previously registered to use this forum, you should log in now. CLICK HERE.

    If you have never registered to use this website before, please CLICK HERE.

Domiracernick - Inherited Rapide

Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club

Well Known and Active Website User
Staff member
VOC Member
@Domiracernick - welcome to the online forum website of the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club.

We love to know a bit more about our new members, so please take a couple of minutes to introduce yourself to the other members.

Do you have a bike?
Are you looking for a bike?
What's your interest in the marque?
 

Domiracernick

Website User
VOC Member
Good morning and thank you for allowing me to join the group. I have inherited a Rapide over 10 years ago which has not turned the wheel since. It was a usable running motorcycle and is 100% complete. But I need to go through it myself to check everything before firing her back up. I took the tank off yesterday and noticed internally it will need blasting because it looks like it has been lined with the resin which has broken down. It looks like the tank has been opened up underneath in the past to do this. The tank is not in the best condition so I was wondering whether to purchase one painted from eBay. I’m not too worried about the bike being concourse condition as i intend to use it not show it. Plus also I don’t have the funds to give it to somebody so will be working on it myself as I can use a set of spanners. Just looking forward to the kickstart launching me through the garage roof!!
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
Good morning and thank you for allowing me to join the group. I have inherited a Rapide over 10 years ago which has not turned the wheel since. It was a usable running motorcycle and is 100% complete. But I need to go through it myself to check everything before firing her back up. I took the tank off yesterday and noticed internally it will need blasting because it looks like it has been lined with the resin which has broken down. It looks like the tank has been opened up underneath in the past to do this. The tank is not in the best condition so I was wondering whether to purchase one painted from eBay. I’m not too worried about the bike being concourse condition as i intend to use it not show it. Plus also I don’t have the funds to give it to somebody so will be working on it myself as I can use a set of spanners. Just looking forward to the kickstart launching me through the garage roof!!
You can use solvents to remove old tank liners. Do a search on petrol tank liner removal/solvents or similar. Make sure there are no leaks before you have any tank painted and if you buy a new tank unpainted check that it fits properly before painting too. Paint finishes must be ethanol proof. It is also a good idea to have fuel filters in your supply line. My Rapide has never kicked me back in 50,00 miles, set up properly A Vincent is easy to start. Doing your own spanner work will save money is personally very rewarding. If you are not sure about things you will get lots of help on this forum.
Get it going and ride it. The Vincent riding experience is unique and surprisingly good for a bike that is probably 70 years old.
 

Domiracernick

Website User
VOC Member
You can use solvents to remove old tank liners. Do a search on petrol tank liner removal/solvents or similar. Make sure there are no leaks before you have any tank painted and if you buy a new tank unpainted check that it fits properly before painting too. Paint finishes must be ethanol proof. It is also a good idea to have fuel filters in your supply line. My Rapide has never kicked me back in 50,00 miles, set up properly A Vincent is easy to start. Doing your own spanner work will save money is personally very rewarding. If you are not sure about things you will get lots of help on this forum.
Get it going and ride it. The Vincent riding experience is unique and surprisingly good for a bike that is probably 70 years old.
Thanks I will take a look at the removers today .. once stripped back do most reline them again ? I was going to let a local guy very lightly blast the inside to remove, but will investigate further. The starting process doesn't scare me a much as i thought after watching some you tube tips on using the decompress level 1st..
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
Thanks I will take a look at the removers today .. once stripped back do most reline them again ? I was going to let a local guy very lightly blast the inside to remove, but will investigate further. The starting process doesn't scare me a much as i thought after watching some you tube tips on using the decompress level 1st..
Don't bother messing about trying to ease it over the top on on compression. Just pull in the valve lifter and give it a good swing and let go of the valve lifter near the bottom of the kickstart stroke. The inertia of the flywheels does the rest of the work. Might take a few practice swings to get the swing, let go point co-ordinated. Easier on your leg and knees.
 

Domiracernick

Website User
VOC Member
Don't bother messing about trying to ease it over the top on on compression. Just pull in the valve lifter and give it a good swing and let go of the valve lifter near the bottom of the kickstart stroke. The inertia of the flywheels does the rest of the work. Might take a few practice swings to get the swing, let go point co-ordinated. Easier on your leg and knees.
yes i noticed this method on a few videos.. seems alot easier on the knees !! thanks
 

Domiracernick

Website User
VOC Member
Planning a trip to my guy to look at the tank for a little blast to rid the mess inside.. So I was thinking of whilst im there giving him my exhaust and crank case covers.. If i drain the oil can these be removed easy without springs flying all over the garage ?
 

Chris Launders

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Don't have your timing cover blasted if you can avoid it, you will spend the rest of eternity trying to get the grit out of the oil passageways etc, you're ok with the gearbox cover as it's just a cover, not the gearbox itself. You have to remove the clutch to get the primary cover off. Better off just cleaning them all up manually.
 

Domiracernick

Website User
VOC Member
Don't have your timing cover blasted if you can avoid it, you will spend the rest of eternity trying to get the grit out of the oil passageways etc, you're ok with the gearbox cover as it's just a cover, not the gearbox itself. You have to remove the clutch to get the primary cover off. Better off just cleaning them all up manually.
Sorry im didnt make myself clear i was getting the internals of the tank softly blasted to remove all the debris.The guys also polishes chrome etc .. Was thinking that for the 2x larger cases and the valve tops all polished up. Also any idea on where to get new valve cap top seals ?
 
Last edited:

Normski

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Hi, if removing the primary chaincase cover it’s important to slacken off the primary chain adjustment first.
It’s very helpful to have the books - Know thy Beast by Stevens, Vincent Motorcycles by Richardson and a parts manual all available from the club spares shop.
 

Ken Tidswell

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
yes i noticed this method on a few videos.. seems alot easier on the knees !! thanks
do not try to start it without using the valve lifter . Beacuse if the ratchet slips you could break you leg . this is not a joke. i know of somene new to Vincents used to start his bike this way . The kick start ratchet sipped and he broke his leg
 

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Also removing the cover requires disassembling the clutch. You should go easy on trying to take apart too much; there's many a barn find Vin with a dismantled clutch. These bikes are wonderful to ride, but there are many adjustments and "careful assembly" and thorough understanding of the machine is required.

Diagram.png
 

Domiracernick

Website User
VOC Member
Also removing the cover requires disassembling the clutch. You should go easy on trying to take apart too much; there's many a barn find Vin with a dismantled clutch. These bikes are wonderful to ride, but there are many adjustments and "careful assembly" and thorough understanding of the machine is required.

View attachment 39600
yup looks like the case will be staying in situ and getting polished whilst on the bike ! thanks
 

Can't Find What You Need?

Buyer Beware: Fake or Real?


Top