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Back at the shadow - Hint to motor failure

Ducdude

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Well the weather is glorious 16C and sunny and all the bikes that can be serviced in the stable have been and the only one that is not running perfectly is waiting or parts from Italy.

So, what is a boy to do..? Either go for a ride or Start the list of stuff I have to do to get the UFM and RFM ready for when the Shadows motor makes it back.

The Vin won out:

Here the short list:

Clean out the Oil Tank
Replace FT tire tube as it has a slow leak
Clean up and re lube swingarm bearings and re-shim and clean out the bearing enclosure
Put the new O-Ring safe rear sprocket on
Put in new front brake shoes

I got as far as the oil tank and what I am finding is probably the cause of the seizure of the ft cylinder after 500 miles..

I expected to find sludge and aluminum shavings but what I am finding in the oil tank flush is SAND....!!

Yup it looks to be a about a handful of sand so far...

I put the grit under the 500X dissecting microscope in the garage and I can see slate, quartz, silica and what is probably other pulverized sedimentary rock.

Yes I have a microscope in the garage no lathe but a microscope....:)

So, the goal is to continue the flush until no more grit come out.

I will also ask the previous owner if they have and idea how the sand got in there. Not that it matters as the motor already needed a rebuild badly and I WILL get all the debris out of the oil tank..

I will also let the rebuilder know to keep and eye out for clogged or damaged oilways or galleys from grit infused oil..

For the record I never saw any of this grit in the 3 oil changes in the filter or in the oil over the 500miles we rode.

Oh what fun..

Good to be working on the old girl though..:)

Cheers,
Eric
 

passenger0_0

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
If the abrasive was coarser than 500 grit it probably explains why the engine was running 'rough'. :) Cheers David
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I strongly recommend putting an inspection hatch into the top of the oil tank to aid the flushing out. Almost impossible to do the job properly without. When doing the rebuild do not forget the galleries in the timing cover, the oil pipes and unions as well, quill feed to the big end and just about everything else. What about the oil pump itself? If sand has been going through it then it must be knackered. If you do not intend to do the rebuild yourself then perhaps the rebuilder should do the dismantling. It is an important part of any rebuild to learn from what one finds during the dismantling.
 

Bracker1

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Sounds like the material used when sandcasting aluminun. Wouldn't think any one would sand blast an oil tank. wierd. good luck, Dan
 

Ducdude

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
It sounds like either malicious vandalism or a case of no care being taken during some blasting.


I would be willing to bet it was vandalized somtime in the 50's. It has been sitting alone in storage for 40 years before I got it.....

No worries we can fix this ...

Cheers,
Eric
 

Ducdude

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
If the abrasive was coarser than 500 grit it probably explains why the engine was running 'rough'. :) Cheers David

It is more like 100-250 grit sand.

Still none was in the oil filter... I cut up that thing and really looked ...Nothing..

Thanks,
Eric
 

Ducdude

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I strongly recommend putting an inspection hatch into the top of the oil tank to aid the flushing out. Almost impossible to do the job properly without. When doing the rebuild do not forget the galleries in the timing cover, the oil pipes and unions as well, quill feed to the big end and just about everything else. What about the oil pump itself? If sand has been going through it then it must be knackered. If you do not intend to do the rebuild yourself then perhaps the rebuilder should do the dismantling. It is an important part of any rebuild to learn from what one finds during the dismantling.

I hear ya but I cannot bare to cut a hole in my oil tank. The flush I am using is designed to dissolve dry lacquered fuel and dried caked and sledged oil...I let it soak a good long time and agitated it regularly... The inside of the tank is nice and clean now... and the sand content is dropping with each flush...

The rebuilder knows about the sand now he did all the disassembly he plans to go over and evaluate and or replace most of the bottom end ....I have every confidence in his work..

Much Thanks,
Eric
 
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Ducdude

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
never bead or sand blast a UFM sand has no boundarys

If it was sand blasted it must have been done in the 50's-60s in the UK. Since the late 60s it has sat un-loved un-ridden, un-started in a dark lonely cellar in the US...

I am still thinking some nasty bloke did the vandalism..

Eric
 
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roy the mechanic

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I realise you are resisting cutting a hole in the u f m. Check-out conway's manhole conversion, it is a well known part accepted by most vincenteers.
 
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