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E: Engine Todays task

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Nearly finished my rebuild on the Comet just fitting the exhaust pipe. The nut wont screw in! Now I think I am quite good on this item but it wont go in. I have a spare nut or two in the stash and one of those fits a treat, I get out the calipers and yes the one on the pipe is an oversize nut I guess the 90 bore head had been 'seen to' and this new head is a pretty new standard head so its time to change nuts. I have a socket that just slips in the pipe and fitted to an extension in the vice I heat up the pipe and flatten the flange, then I swap nuts and get out my trusty 2 piece clamp. Its nothing special just a piece of alloy round bar about 1" or so long with a hole in the center same size as a pipe with about 3/8" parallel bored and the rest re-leave tapered then split in half. But without it you would have to be a real blacksmith to achieve a new flange. Pipe up the heat start the flare with a ball pain hammer flatten out with a tap hammer and file the face and flange sides then finally make sure the flange fits right up inside the port. add gasket then screw in nut by hand well into port, tighten a turn or so and leave final tighten till the engine is warm.
The workshop is the only cure for the Ground Hog day syndrome :rolleyes: so why not tell us about your days job?
 

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Glenliman

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VOC Member
Starting in to build a Thruxton R fuel tank in .063" alloy. Planning to do away with the visible seam the Thruxton has at bottom. Can't fault them for using it as the original Triumph they styled from had the seam.
I think it might look better without the seam.
Also, the tank bottom will be made to fit a Norton Commando frame.
I'm using a series of Ball Pang Hammers with various curvatures. They are Ball Pang Hammers as the heads are nylon and only cause a sharp Pang that ebbs away after a day or two.
A Ball Pain hammer has more capacity for pain. That pain can last into the next decade, should you still be alive and have functioning nerve endings!

Glen
 

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Glenliman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Possibly. I'll see how it goes with the knee indents. They are tricky to do.
I'm a first timer on the indents, struggling like Ann Murray on high heels!

Glen
 

Glenliman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Yes I have, it's full.
Not surprising for a bike with throttle by wire, ride modes, o2 sensor circuitry, traction control, abs, heated grips, electronic fuel injection, diagnostic circuitry and so on.
For the current project bike, which will have none of the above, it might be nice to go back to basics. Maybe 4 fuses and 4 circuits.
And a big brass squeeze horn like Marcus has, there's one circuit deleted!
Is there a lightweight alloy version?

Glen
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Yes you get it all sorted ... Then.... push the reflector assembly in and all those connectors get the strain we have all been there
Well.... not saying you are wrong, but I did “plan” ahead. Because it’s mostly a collection of parts from a dumpster (tip for you folk) I can do whatever I need to do. There is a contact strip riveted to the back of the bucket which tames most of the single wire/connections, switched power feeds and dedicated grounds. There are 4 other tethers attached to the bucket at 2,5,7, and 10 o’clock which are supposed to keep the main harness, handlebar switch harnesses etc secured and away from the centre and ensure there is enough room for the headlight connector. I’m using a sealed beam that is fairly shallow and doesn’t take up too much real estate. There are a few wires ( ignition sensor grounds, A/F gauge, wideband sensor heater etc. that I can run elsewhere if need be, but there seems to be enough room. The tethers should prevent any chafing.... anyway, it’s still a plan (and a work in progress). Hopefully the pudding that contains the proof will be served up shortly so I can move onto another project that is not so devoid of logic and sanity.
 
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Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Stuffing a million miles of spaghetti into a 6 1/2” bucket.
Thirty years ago my Triumph Trident's headlamp bucked looked exactly like that. Until it abruptly lost power on an 85 mph curve on the Interstate, with a steep drop-off leaving me no way to get more than 2 ft. off the highway. That experience taught me to be a lot less cavalier with wiring.
 

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