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Misc: Everything Else Standard Comet Special


Oldhaven

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Just mostly finished the fiddly tasks of fitting the exhaust and seat/tank, which up until now have just been sitting loose on the bike. The tailpiece and seat are salvaged from a 961 Norton. The seat support required making 5 mirror image out of plane bends in the 1" DOM tubing to imitate the Norton rear subframe. I am glad I built in some adjustability as getting it all to fit without the rear tire smacking the seat on bump was difficult. The tank is an Egli original , probably from an Egli Honda, and is supported off the 4" oil tank by a semi circular aluminum arch with neoprene padding strips under it and also between it and the tank. I am amazed at how much time and fabrication this all takes. Soon this first assembly will all have to come apart so I can finish lightening, painting and polishing all the bits I made over the winter. I also have to finish up valve timing, ignition, and getting the engine all buttoned up. Plus we have the house on the market so at any time we will have to pack all this up and move it somewhere else. That could easily put completion into next year.

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Black Flash

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Something I just saw today on your pictures ist the very special David dunfey clutch cover, nice.
Also I can't see oil lines.
Were are they going to on this DD special UFM?
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Ron has done a lovely job!

I had been using the two "D's", one back to the other, as a logo. Ron, was kind enough to add a "V" to it to give the effort a proper logo. I thank Ron for that:
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I think Ron has not gotten around to the oil lines. The UFM is reasonably standard. It has a spin-on oil filter, which doubles as the oil return. The return oil line will enter the spin-on filter mount, go through the filter and then up through the tank to the clear line that shows the oil is pumping. As the oil returns to the tank through the other end of that line it drops into the tank.

The feed for the oil pump is taken from the middle of the UFM. On the stock UFM that is the return. I moved these points to get the oil lines away from the rear part of the UFM because the single shock mount in the rear takes up most of the space that was devoted to the original oil line routing. This was not a problem with the twin shock Eglis, but it is with the mono shock Eglis.

David
 

Oldhaven

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VOC Member
I have a couple of pictures of your Black Flash in my project folder for inspiration and ideas. I really like what you did.

The clutch cover that came with the engine had the logo machined off, so it was nothing special, and it ended up being the perfect removable part to make with a DDV logo.

Here is some more detail on the oil return to add to Daviddd's explanation. I was just looking at the return lines today, thinking I need to get some 5/16 oil line, and I still have to drill and tap the filter mount like the picture. I waited for this until the engine was mounted so I can pick the nicest way to run the oil line for convenience and aesthetics. I like the way I could throw a cat through the bike without upsetting it too much and hope to keep things tucked away out of sight and retain as much open space as possible. The TP head uses barbed fittings rather than the standard and complex banjos and steel lines so I will be doing the lines like yours. Someone else over there has what looks like hydraulic fittings with braided lines on a TP head Comet, though that is probably overkill. I did find a nice small chrome non return oil filter cartridge that looks nicer than the typical Fram filter.

Ron UFM 7.jpgRon UFM 8.jpgRon UFM 10.jpg
 
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davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
When I built the first frames, I designed the spin-on filter to sit under the tank. I first used the original US Egli tank because that is what I had.
Egli Oil Tank Mod 16.jpg
Like many of the Vincent tanks this one is designed to be well forward, so it hides the filter. The tank mounts through the top of the tank with a single bolt like the original Egli tank. It rests on 1/2" thick foam on the tunnel. (By the way, that is an aqueous blaster on the right. It is a Graymills Tempest.)

David
 

Little Honda

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
When you say standard stroke, are you going to use a crank from Terry or the factory one you have in the photo?
For my brakes, wheels and forks, I'm tempted to use the internal disc CBX550 stuff that has been sitting in my "someday I'll use that" pile since the early 80's. I have a lay down Norton box, but for the sake of oil retention, I think I will try and find a Commando box as well. I shouldn't even be thinking about it at this point. Must try and stay on track... spent some quality time with my favourite bastard file today. Fitting the rear fender flap.
Nice and complex, too heavy.
 

Oldhaven

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
When I built the first frames, I designed the spin-on filter to sit under the tank. I first used the original US Egli tank because that is what I had.
Like many of the Vincent tanks this one is designed to be well forward, so it hides the filter. The tank mounts through the top of the tank with a single bolt like the original Egli tank. It rests on 1/2" thick foam on the tunnel.
I took some liberties with David's UFM design. My Egli tank was made for a wet sump motorcycle and did not have the cutaway or slot in the front for the large diameter oil filler tube.
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I moved the oil filler as far forward as possible, reduced it to 1 1/4 OD, and angled it back. The Norton 961's use this location. This move allows a tank not specifically designed for an Egli Vincent type UFM to be used. My tank is more like the Fritz Peier type at the front. This scheme worked out well since I could not have moved the tank any further forward as the handlebars would hit it at full lock. What is missing is the forward ears or nose that make the Vincent Egli banana or long range tanks so distinctive, though the dropped tail of the tank with knee cutaways is also a distinctive Egli feature.

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In the original location I added a low profile bung which fits below the neoprene padding to serve as a cleanout, though David provides another nice one at the back of the UFM.

The aluminum arch with 1/4" neoprene above and below it also adds a location to secure the front of the tank with a hold down strap, since my tank did not have the through hole for the Egli UFM bolt David mentions.

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davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I do like the Norton styling very much. I particularly like the knee cutaways in the tank. I would have stayed away from the seat only because of the seat tubes, which would have made my head hurt. However, I think the seat looks great, also.

Fuel tanks are always a bit of a pain to customize. Ron was smart to look for a modern Egli tank. I had hoped to build several different tanks, but when push came to shove, I did not have enough time to hammer them all out. The stock Egli tank in aluminum started to look pretty good and I could piggy back on the small demand that existed for bikes that had fiberglass tanks and needed aluminum tanks. Tom Hill, an Egli owner in Georgia, had Dave Ashenbrenner in Florida copy his US Egli tank in aluminum and I called Dave and ordered several more. I recently drove over to Dave's with an engine and a new frame to allow him to fit a new tank to a real bike rather than copying the original tank. I wanted a tank with a bigger carb cut out underneath the tank and a better fit to the mono-shock frame (it fit the twin shock frame well.)

The frame was designed for a more modern fork. Ron was able to find bearings to run a more traditional fork.
DSCN3171.jpg
I wanted something easy to find, with good handling and lots of aftermarket support, so I chose the stock GSXR. By choosing one fork I could design steering stops and an original steering damper to work. These items are often overlooked on Eglis.

David
 

Oldhaven

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VOC Member
I did the tube bending with a 1" Holsclaw HandyTube Bender. It is one of those nice old tools that don't seem to be available any more, though they do come up on ebay occasionally. I bought 3 of them (1", 3/4" and 1/2"), years ago, but A.L. Frederick must be out of business now. Well worth having if you want to do controlled bends more accurately than using an electricians conduit hickey or taking up space with one of the floor model benders. This one handled the 1" .058 wall steel tubing in the seat support easily without any heating. It is possible to make a bending template using the center spindle and the bend radius to lay out complicated bends on a plywood base. That was how I made the multiple accurate bends in aluminum tubing for my boat frames. It might prove useful for motorcycle frame builders

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Cyborg

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VOC Member
Nice and complex, too heavy.
Agreed they are heavy and a single disc setup would have been adequate, but the looks (more like a drum brake) IMHO seem more at home sitting in front of a Vincent engine. I could, if it bothered me, replace the ventilated cast iron rotors with something lighter. People often comment on the complexity and the time it takes to change pads, but relative to relining the brakes on the B twin, its a cakewalk.
 
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Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Didn't know those tube benders existed. They look slick and I certainly could have used one of those instead of scaring the willies out of the neighbours with a rosebud screaming away on the oxy propane setup.
 

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