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Running in Questions Series D

macvette

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Hi,
I'm finally starting to run in my bike :). The engine has been totally professionally rebuilt, starts easily and idles well. I rebuilt/reconditioned all of the cycle parts. I've put 85 miles on it yesterday, it generally ran well and I have a few questions.
The pipes are turning straw coloured with slight blueing near the heads, they are chrome from Bob Culver, is this a worry at this stage?
When going up the box, it goes straight from 2nd to 4th but will go into 3rd on the way down ie it changes down through all gears ok. Any tips? (I have the books with the adjustment instructions).
I am going to do a first oil change what do you think is a good mileage 100, 200 etc?
I'm running at a max of 50 mph in 4th, and it feels a little slow to me. The engine has new pistons and liners( as well as everything else), would you recommend a higher speed?
I have read that they are not run in until 2000 miles. Bearing in mind all new internals (machined by Maughans) do you think this still applies?

Thanks Mac
 

vince998

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Hi Mac, good to hear you´ve got it running and another D is alive!!
Seeing as you´ve rebuilt the whole engine (new bearings bushes etc) the slowly slowly approach is correct. (had it just been a rebore and pistons/ rings, i have just read an article that suggests short hard runs with stops to cool off inbetween is the best way of running in new rings to the barrel. I´ll try this next time)
Don´t worry to much about higher revs or speed in gears, just make sure the engine has as little work to do as possible at this early stage (50 in 4th on an uphill gradient can be more damaging than letting the bike climb at the same speed in 3rd or second). On downhill bits, you can let the bike do its thing and pull the engine. The trick is not to let the engine labour or get to hot for long periods.
As long as no unusual rattles appear, i would change the oil at 500 miles (be prepared for a scattering of metal particles in all colours), then at 1000 and then at 2000.You´ll probably burn a bit of oil during the first 500 miles so keep topping up.
Don´t worry about the pipes changing colour at this point, your on the pilots at these speeds so the mixture will be a bit on the weak side.(Apart from that, purple near the nuts tapering off to straw down the pipe sounds about right)
Gearchange problems sounds like adjustment of the stops needs looking at. Make sure the spring loaded bronze arm thingy (sorry, it´s early) is centralised between the stops (by adjusting the stop plate).
You´re performing a balance act at the moment of giving the rings a chance to bed in (for this they have to be prressed out onto the bores which means they need working), and not overloading/overheating the new guides/bushes/bearings etc.
Once you have the feeling the rings are starting to free up (this should be evident after 500 miles) take it onto the motorway for a couple of hours at easy speeds (i accelerate-shut off, accelerate, shutoff at 1 mile intervals at this stage, using no more than 1/2 throttle. Once i´ve reached 1000 miles, i´ll slowly increase the throttle settings every 100 miles or so) This gives the engine a chance to thouroughly warm up and operate at normal speeds/tolerances. It´ll also bring any leaks to your attention.
 

Black Flash

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Hi Mac,
slight blueing near the head is ok, I would start being concerned when the blueing is about 8 inches or more. Regarding running in, the most important is not to let the engine labour hard but to spin the engine freely. staying at 50 MPH religiously does not sound too good for me. going up a small gradient on a and b roads it will be better to go back to third and go uphill with a freespinning engine and little load. downhill I cannot see a reason why not having 70 or more on the clock.
check all the nuts and bolts after very ride in the beginning, some of the gaskets do settle alot.
I personally would change the oil after 200, 500 and 1000 miles.
when the engine is fully run in is hard to say, slogging the engine for 2000 miles and then give it some beans is calling for trouble. when you keep the engine spinning freely during your rides you will feel the engine loosening up and you can gradually use more power, if the engine feels straint reduce your speed. As I said before make use of your gearbox and do not rely on the engines tourque during running in.
After all, I think we are much more concerned about those bikes then the owners were when they first bought them.
 

vince998

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Just as a matter of interest Mac, what oil are you using at this stage?
I´ve learnt from experience that using your super slippery oil is not good for running in (especially the bores and rings)
A mediocre detertgent oil (garage forecourt or Halfords special in 20/50) is good at this stage.
Afterall, "running in" is a fine wearing process and slight wear has to take place if a free running engine with the necessary clearances is to be achieved.
Just a thought.
 

macvette

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Thanks for the quick replies. I asked about the oil change because I'll need to drain the oil to adjust the gear change. The oil I'm using is Chatsworth 30 Classic, it's a straight, detegent oil. It's 30 because I first ran the bikle for it's MOT test in late Sept hoping to get some miles on it but the snows came so I couldn't. I'm in N Yorks so we have nice winding roads with hills where you can maintain 50mph uphill down dale but excercise the bike at the same time. Going uphill, I change down to maintain the revs at what sounds like 50 mph in top on the flat, going downhill, I let the bike go into over run to again maintain the revs at what sounds like 50mph on the flat. I know my speedo is accurate because my mate flew wingman on his 800 Gilera scooter with digital speedo.
I have run in loads of old cars (see avatar) and know that labouring an engine is the worst you can do. It's just that 50 mph on the flat felt instinctively a bit slow.
I'll be going through a nut and bolt tightness check before I go out again, having lost the nut from the drive side of the centre stand pivot, now replaced and locked by split pin. Forgot to ask, do you theink adjusting the battery carrier nuts will have any effect? The change is not stiff.
What are you guys doing in Germany?
Thanks Mac
 
Last edited:

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
"I'll need to drain the oil to adjust the gear change." Not if you disconnect the supply line at the rear of the UFM first.

"do you think adjusting the battery carrier nuts will have any effect?" They need to be right to prevent the G50 plate from bending and affecting the shifter mechanism.
 

A-BCD

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Never heard of having to drain the oil to adjust the gearchange !! Is it something peculiar to Ds - I've only owned A B & C ( so far............ ) ?
 

macvette

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Well you have now. The D doesn't have an oil tank in the UFM. The tank is on the right rear as you sit on the bike hence the pipe routing is different and they don't have the shut off thingy that I think the earlier series had
Regards Mac
 

Howard

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Hi Mac

I'm with Black Flash on this one. If the engine feels comfortable, up to 70 would be fine. Keep it down to 50 for the first 100 miles or so, then gradually increase, don't watch the clock to 500 miles and go from 50 to top speed all in one go. I think the red handbook gives running-in instructions, but I haven't read it for some time.

I have to say, if I was bluing exhausts at 50 mph running-in, I'd be inclined to richen the mixture a bit on the pilot screw and possibly lift the needle a notch.

H
 

Howard

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I must have a better memeory retention than I thought. Just read the rider's handbook it suggests 2000 miles running-in period gradually building up the speed, and it says "50 mph would not be too fast" but it doesn't actually say what would be too fast.

H
 
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