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E: Engine Comet Mongrel


davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Would this work good enough, With out a Notcher ?.
Yes. I think it would. I was building frames that certified welders with lots of experience were doing all the final welds and I was trying to hand them items that met their expectations. I had seen this video and it did help, but at that time the welder asked me if I could get rid of the gaps. I got the notcher and all the gaps went away and it was a one shot deal. I found that with the notcher I did not have gaps and with little or no practice I could get the angle on tubes with the first try. There was no fitting or additional cutting.
DSCN0586.JPG
The top of this piece on the right is welded to a 4" diameter tube on an angle.
Egli Jig 2016 14.jpg
This is the top. The tube is splayed at an angle and the cut is in different planes. This was the first attempt and it was why I liked the notcher. I was not getting this quality doing it by hand.

When I got the notcher I did do a bunch of sample notches on scrap tubing just to get the technique down. It also gave me some pieces that I could keep that were marked with the set-up so I could use them to guess what settings would work. It saved me a huge amount of time. I have not had the need to do many right angle or diagonal cuts that are used on roll cages, which might be easier.

David
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Bill, with that mag drill, you could probably make up a simple jig and use a hole saw for a least some of the cuts. I used the mill which worked ok, but depending on the angle it was sometimes a challenge to set up. At first I used an end mill, but found that a hole saw was a lot faster. Not my mill in the photo, but it illustrates the limit of the angles you can cut.

I think David pretty much nailed it. It works, but for me it would take too much time to master it.
In a moment of weakness, I bought a plasma cutter, so may give that a go for some simple notches.

As they say, you get what you pay for, but you make a version of this or maybe find a used one.

09FB2879-F3C2-4656-B6E5-1D39CC1322AD.jpeg
 
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Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Yes I am saving my Mag drill for the Big job, But after, I think it will be good for other things.
I made some nice Alloy Standard footrest pivots, I tried to use my Ped' Drill and a cheap x y table, But too much chatter, So used a grinding wheel and some hand work, I love working with Alloy, You can polish it up on the buffing wheel, And looks like top job.
If I was building another Special, I think I would still go for a Vincent Headstock and a "D" top tube, It looks so simple to me.
 

litnman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
In thirty plus years of building alum, ss and brass/bronze handrails this was my favorite machine. With ss the joints were fused then polished seldom requiring any grinding.
I've also built a few bike frames using this antique. It uses standard hole saws from 1" to 4".
I have several soft jaws for different diameter tube.
Coping.jpg
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
In thirty plus years of building alum, ss and brass/bronze handrails this was my favorite machine. With ss the joints were fused then polished seldom requiring any grinding.
I've also built a few bike frames using this antique. It uses standard hole saws from 1" to 4".
I have several soft jaws for different diameter tube.
View attachment 30646
I inherited a small Atlas horizontal mill that very rarely gets used, but I can’t bring myself to part with it. I think you gave me... just what I need...another rabbit hole to explore.
74F8F7E8-A39C-4130-9539-09A4B8DB335A.jpeg
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I don't have a problem with the "D" headstock, Where it fits inside the head bracket, But I would have thought
The older type was more stable to twisting, Wonder if it was cheaper to make ?.
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Here's a little program for coping (fish mouthing) tubing.
Thanks for that. Is there some reason why you use hole saws instead of an annular cutter? I know the saws are cheaper, but thinking maybe an annular cutter would last longer? I did end up using hole saws instead of end mills because it was faster and less chatter on the poor old Taiwanese vertical mill, but the saws seem to take a beating.

Apparently the arbor on the Atlas mill has a MT2 taper, so turns out I can just remove the arbor and support arm, pop in a MT2 mandrel with a hole saw or cutter attached. I also have a seldom used 2 way vise, so I think I’m good to go for tube notching. So in one respect I ‘m thankful you posted that photo, but on the flip side I’m wondering why I couldn’t have figured the that out before. Not reading enough of the right kind of poetry?
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
Is it yours Ed ?, I have seen something like it on youtube, I would have loved to have done something like that, Magic.
No, not mine Bill. My friend Tony built it. He has had the tank painted now and needs to fit the seat and a few other bits and pieces. It should be on the road in the Spring when the salt has gone. I called in to see him on my Rapide and he was just about to start it for the first time. He primed it and it then went 1st kick. The photo is taken from a video I made of it on my phone.
 

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