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PT: Exhaust Ceramic coating

Gary Gittleson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I just spoke to Eastwood. The fellow I spoke to used to ride a Norton but gave it up when his brother got killed on a bike. I wish we didn't have to live with that threat.

Anyhow, he said that the product would help prevent discolorization but he wasn't sure if it would be a complete solution. He also recommended acetone as a cleaning agent for used pipes. I reminded him that the video promotes their cleaner and that used pipes will have carbon buildup to be removed but he said acetone is better for that. That reply seemed strange to me. It could be a sign of honesty or just one of ignorance.

I may give this a try over the winter and report the results -- probably in the spring, after a bit of riding with newly-cleaned and protected pipes.

Do any of you performance pros have an opinion about the idea of keeping the heat inside the pipes? Not that I plan to race.
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Exhaust pipe coatings and/or wraps have not demonstrated any serious performance enhancements. They can solve problems with unwanted heat, but these are mostly small and very specific issues.

David
 

Gerry Clarke

Active Website User
VOC Member
IMG_1843 (1024x669).jpg


From a pal, I bought a second hand set of mild steel pipes that had been ceramic coated. Here is a photo several thousand miles after fitment. No discolouration.

Gerry
 

litnman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Has anyone tried winding fine copper wire around the pipes near the exhaust port? A local gent
did it on his 1965 Sportster when new and there is no discoloration never has been.
 

Rob H

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I had a new set of chrome pipes internally coated many years ago to prevent discoloration. To some extent it was successful. The things I discovered were as follows:

In principle it does work as the coating prevents heat transfer from the hot exhaust gases to the pipe which prevents the discolouration. However if you use copper exhaust gaskets you can still get discolouration at the top due to direct heat transfer from the cylinder head, it is better to use asbestos/fibre type.

Although the coating prevents discolouration of the downpipes the heat is retained in the exhaust gases and just moves the problem downstream and you will find that silencer/muffler will now start to discolour.

As for performance on a road bike there is no discernible difference.
 

Gerry Clarke

Active Website User
VOC Member
With external ceramic on the pipes, in several thousand miles there has been no discolouration of either the pipes or the muffler/silencer. None at all. Perhaps the persistent rain on the wild Atlantic coast here helps!

Gerry
 

Marcus Bowden

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Henry Martini had a set of coated pipes like that and called it Irish "Chrome" him being an Irishman thought well they do give a different look and didn't discolour and he rode it hard even I had a go on it and probably one of the smoothest I've ridden. (Bob Dunn Rebuild).
bananaman.
 

Gerry Clarke

Active Website User
VOC Member
Marcus,

Those are my old mate Henry's pipes. We hit a big dog and flattened a section of pipe so these were the replacements.

Gerry
 

Chris Launders

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
A common way to stop pipes discolouring among custom bike builders is to coat the inside with VHT exhaust paint, the pipes must be new or chemically cleaned inside to remove any carbon or oil residue.
Plug one end of the pipe and spray a copious amount of the paint in, cover the open end and slosh it about until the pipe is coated all over, uncover the end and tip any remaining paint into a container and seal.
Let that coat of paint dry and repeat several times.
You can use the saved paint in the container as well.
Chris.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Personally I rather like a touch of blue on me pipes shows it been working
However if I found internally it makes it go faster (jury out) I would bother and as I say Roy Robertson did it
 

Albervin

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
A common way to stop pipes discolouring among custom bike builders is to coat the inside with VHT exhaust paint, the pipes must be new or chemically cleaned inside to remove any carbon or oil residue.
Plug one end of the pipe and spray a copious amount of the paint in, cover the open end and slosh it about until the pipe is coated all over, uncover the end and tip any remaining paint into a container and seal.
Let that coat of paint dry and repeat several times.
You can use the saved paint in the container as well.
Chris.
I too have heard of that and is a much cheaper alternative to ceramic. As I have S/S pipes I have been talked out of ceramic coating. I remember Henry's bike and while I was not that impressed with the dull finish he did have it well tuned. He was a great character, a dear friend and much missed.
 

Pushrod Twin

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Are you saying you extend the flange on both front and rear? The problem then arises on which pipes. Mine are Australian which are most like different to your pipes. I like the three piece because they give you some movement for fit. Not worried about original.
Overlander?
 

Pushrod Twin

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Nope. Just three different bikes.
Unfortunately, I have had mufflers crack and break. V7 Sport and Egli replica. To be fair, both were 1980's manufacture and the muffler shells were light gauge material. I would expect that by now they would be using heavier gauge tube and have no problems.
 

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