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Sat-Navs Sat-Navs: Any Recommendations?

Rob H

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Looking at getting a sat nav for the bike for touring and would be interested in what other members use and any tips.

Are specific motorcycle sat nav any better than car ones, they seem a lot more expensive.
 

rapcom

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Without getting into brand-specific discussion, the immediate criteria are that the sat-nav must be water-proof and vibration-proof for motorcycle use. Most car ones are not. That narrows down the field substantially.
If you want to feed audio navigation instructions to your helmet, then you need a dedicated "audio out" socket on the unit, or Bluetooth capability. That narrows it down some more. If you go for Bluetooth, then you need a Bluetooth adaptor for your helmet, and have to recharge your helmet every day (not so easy if you are camping).
How big a display do you need? If you use reading glasses, they are very inconvenient on a bike.
What mountings are available for your chosen model? Windscreen, handlebar, RAM mount, custom brackets?
Do you want to be able to swop it from car to bike and back again?
UK database, Europe wide, capability to load US or Oz?
As usual of course, ask a dozen riders and you'll get 13 answers....
 

riptragle1953

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Hey, make up an oversize frame with rubber cord to float the device..... like the old racing speedometers did...... yeah, go original!
 

John Cone

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
And what's wrong with a good tank bag and a piece A4 paper? As a trucker even i don't use a sat nav, read the map before i leave home and god provided me with a tongue in my head. Happy new year to you all.
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Website Moderator
Rapcom gives some good general criteria.
More specifically I have used a Garmin Zumo 600 on the Rapide for thousands of miles and found it to be very good. The supplied bike mount fits easily onto the handle bars with plenty of adjustment to get the best angle for viewing when riding. It is quickly and easily removed from the mounting bracket to slip into your pocket at stops.
The unit has proved waterproof on some long and very wet rides.
The kit comes with a car mount too so that the unit can be used in a car.
I have used earphones plugged into the socket on the unit to receive the voice instructions and recently I have used the Bluetooth facility to wirelessly connect to my new Cardo Scala G4 intercom.
The Garmin maps seem quite good but would advise buying a "lifetime" update to keep abreast of new roads.
The internal battery lasts quite well but I usually use it plugged into a 12 volt socket on the bike.
If you want music on the move the Zumo can play mp3 files and the music is automatically muted when a navigation instruction is given.
It takes a micro SD card for additional storage of extra maps, music or jpg files so you can view pictures of your favourite bike etc.;-)
It is easy to put destinations into the unit using an address or postcode.
I use Garmin Mapsource software on my laptop to produce custom routes that I can then upload to the Zumo. (This is great for planning club runs where I want to avoid built up areas.)

Another popular waterproof motorcycle unit is by TomTom although I don't have personal experience of this.

The waterproof GPS devices unfortunately seem very expensive compared with units for "dry" car use.

Looking at getting a sat nav for the bike for touring and would be interested in what other members use and any tips.

Are specific motorcycle sat nav any better than car ones, they seem a lot more expensive.
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 1085

Guest
And what's wrong with a good tank bag and a piece A4 paper? As a trucker even i don't use a sat nav, read the map before i leave home and god provided me with a tongue in my head. Happy new year to you all.
I'd say as with all tools knowing their limitations and using the best tool for the job.
Keith
 
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