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Oil Pump

Puddle jumper

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
Hi Guys,
Can any one tell me if it's possible to remove and replace the oil pump and worm drive with out splitting the crank case's, as I intend to fit a new 2 start pump and worm.
Cheers PJ
 

Tom Gaynor

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Twin-start oil pumps deliver twice as much oil...

I fitted a twin-start pump and worm. It has taken about three years (continual, not continuous) to upgrade the breather to cope with the extra oil in the crankcases. And better put a deflector in the oil return in the tank neck because at speed it comes out fast enough and hard enough to overwhelm the cap sealing. (A bit of bent 1/16" ally is fine, cut out with tin-snips, and secured by the chain-oiler adjusting screw - which I have closed off.)
I've done it, so it'll remain done. But I now think that unless I had wanted to race the bike (I didn't and still don't) then it wasn't necessary. A new standard pump would have been fine.

Tom
Hi Guys,
Can any one tell me if it's possible to remove and replace the oil pump and worm drive with out splitting the crank case's, as I intend to fit a new 2 start pump and worm.
Cheers PJ
 

Puddle jumper

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
I fitted a twin-start pump and worm. It has taken about three years (continual, not continuous) to upgrade the breather to cope with the extra oil in the crankcases. And better put a deflector in the oil return in the tank neck because at speed it comes out fast enough and hard enough to overwhelm the cap sealing. (A bit of bent 1/16" ally is fine, cut out with tin-snips, and secured by the chain-oiler adjusting screw - which I have closed off.)
I've done it, so it'll remain done. But I now think that unless I had wanted to race the bike (I didn't and still don't) then it wasn't necessary. A new standard pump would have been fine.

Tom

Hi Tom,
Can you tell what mod's you did to the breather, The engine is going in a custom that I m building, so the oil tank is completely different to a Vincent one, and has a combined oil filter on the return side, which should cope with the return flow.
Cheers Paul
 

Tom Gaynor

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Breather details

Timed breather is plugged. (Breathing, as you will see, isn't really my problem.)

I have a D type breather on the front exhaust valve cap: not the optimum position, which is probably the front inlet or rear exhaust (both higher), but easy of access and still unobtrusive)

From breather cap via banjo and about 8" of 3/8" bore pipe to PCV valve bought in UK from race car site - Google Speedflow perhaps - and marked "-6 SPEED-FLOW.V.FLOW" - I have three of them, on three different bikes. They work. On the Vin it sits up under the tank alongside the front carb. The pipe slopes slightly upwards, in the vain hope that gravity will separate out some oil.

From the PCV, about a foot of 3/8" pipe into a catch bottle. It's important to use largish bore pipes that are short. To find out why, just try breathing through 2 feet of "breather pipe". Stop when you see the little blue lights.

About 2 more feet of 3/8" pipe from catch bottle and extending 1" beyond the end of the rear stand.

The catch bottle is a 0.75 litre ally drinking-water bottle from Millets (about £4), with the threads turned out of the neck and a suitably turned ally plug sitting loosely in the hole. There are two metal pipes set into the ally plug, one that reaches about 2" into the bottle - the inlet - and the other about 1/2" - the exhaust. I could just have pushed both pipes into the neck, but I do HAVE a lathe, so... Arguably the exhaust pipe is unnecessary, and I might at some point dispense with it. That remains to be investigated.

The catch bottle sits on two strips of 1" wide sticky-back rubber foam (might have come from VWP) and is held by wide (permanent) tie-wraps to my pannier frame such that it can easily be removed to be emptied back into the oil-tank, then replaced.

This is only necessary if I've been giving it the hammer. If I stay around 60 max, "apparent" oil consumption is virtually nil: no oil is dumped in the bottle. Half an hour at 80 or 90, and that alters. It increases (apparent) oil consumption to about 250 miles / pint, or worse. I have no problems with smoky exhausts, or fouled plugs, so oil is not, in fact, being consumed, it is being dumped. It used to be dumped to atmosphere, now it is dumped to the bottle. No oil ever gets to the end of the bottle exhaust pipe. The bike is clean: through some aerodynamic freak, oil vapour used to blow forwards...

Why do it that way? Because I think neffalump trunk breathers are hideous, however effective. And effective but hideous never did it for me.

Tom
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Puddle jumper

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
Timed breather is plugged. (Breathing, as you will see, isn't really my problem.)

I have a D type breather on the front exhaust valve cap: not the optimum position, which is probably the front inlet or rear exhaust (both higher), but easy of access and still unobtrusive)

From breather cap via banjo and about 8" of 3/8" bore pipe to PCV valve bought in UK from race car site - Google Speedflow perhaps - and marked "-6 SPEED-FLOW.V.FLOW" - I have three of them, on three different bikes. They work. On the Vin it sits up under the tank alongside the front carb. The pipe slopes slightly upwards, in the vain hope that gravity will separate out some oil.

From the PCV, about a foot of 3/8" pipe into a catch bottle. It's important to use largish bore pipes that are short. To find out why, just try breathing through 2 feet of "breather pipe". Stop when you see the little blue lights.

About 2 more feet of 3/8" pipe from catch bottle and extending 1" beyond the end of the rear stand.

The catch bottle is a 0.75 litre ally drinking-water bottle from Millets (about £4), with the threads turned out of the neck and a suitably turned ally plug sitting loosely in the hole. There are two metal pipes set into the ally plug, one that reaches about 2" into the bottle - the inlet - and the other about 1/2" - the exhaust. I could just have pushed both pipes into the neck, but I do HAVE a lathe, so... Arguably the exhaust pipe is unnecessary, and I might at some point dispense with it. That remains to be investigated.

The catch bottle sits on two strips of 1" wide sticky-back rubber foam (might have come from VWP) and is held by wide (permanent) tie-wraps to my pannier frame such that it can easily be removed to be emptied back into the oil-tank, then replaced.

This is only necessary if I've been giving it the hammer. If I stay around 60 max, "apparent" oil consumption is virtually nil: no oil is dumped in the bottle. Half an hour at 80 or 90, and that alters. It increases (apparent) oil consumption to about 250 miles / pint, or worse. I have no problems with smoky exhausts, or fouled plugs, so oil is not, in fact, being consumed, it is being dumped. It used to be dumped to atmosphere, now it is dumped to the bottle. No oil ever gets to the end of the bottle exhaust pipe. The bike is clean: through some aerodynamic freak, oil vapour used to blow forwards...

Why do it that way? Because I think neffalump trunk breathers are hideous, however effective. And effective but hideous never did it for me.

Tom

Thanks Tom,
 

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