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H: Hubs, Wheels and Tyres How much run-out for rims


Albervin

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VOC Member
I have had a wheel building/truing/balancing jig for a few years. Up until now I have only used it for balancing. Today I took a leap and rebuilt a front wheel. It took a lot of patience and a bit of swearing. I now have 30 thou of run-out. Is that too much? I would think a tyre would absorb some of that but if needed I can persist to obtain less.
IMG_1211.jpegIMG_1213.jpeg
 

Albervin

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VOC Member
Thanks Bill. I was a bit worried when I laced up the rims I had a pretty good line and when tightening the spoke I thought it would pull out. I was also worried about the roundness but also seems to be a few thou. Beginner's luck. I also had some heavier spokes fitted due to Australian roads so had to take the drums off to fit spokes. Luckily no spacers required.
 

Chris Launders

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VOC Member
30 thou is good, especially with some rims !!!
I've built my own for 40 years and never had any trouble but doing the occasional one for others I've had rims with a massive kick where the weld was, I suspect they were cheap or even seconds.
 

Albervin

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VOC Member
I was warned against stainless rims due to the welding. Having said that I have two on my Rapide. These are chrome steel on my shadow, the rear is an original but the front is new. I do note the front rim has milling to capture the tyre bead and so not require a clamp. I am not sure if the company does the same with all rims. Purchased from a reputable rim shop in Birmingham.
 

Albervin

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VOC Member
It's a real pain when you get the rim spot on and fit the tyre, only to find that the tyre is out! Cheers, Stu.
That is when the hammer, certain words and a strong cup of tea come out. The flexibility of the tyre sometimes is not enough.
 

A_HRD

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VOC Member
I usually aim to get as far below 10 thou as I can - not counting the "kick" where the weld is. Probably teaching granny to suck eggs and all that, but the up and down movement should definitely be minimised below 10 thou otherwise the faster you go on the bike the more you will feel the resultant vibration.

The trick of course is to get the side-to-side and up-and-down readings to a minimum - just at the moment that you have even torque on every spoke. Swearing is an inevitable part of the process!

Peter B
 

Albervin

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VOC Member
Peter, as this is a front wheel I want it as close as I can get. Getting "even torque" is just a concept for me. Surely the weld joint has an effect on up and down as well as the kick. Anyway I have progressed beyond strong tea so need to sign off.
 

vin998

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VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
Having built over 20 wheels over the years I find the weld joint has little effect on the wheel overall as it is over such a short distance. Once you get a tyre on the rim, rotate it and see if the weld has any effect on the tyre shape and I bet you will not be able to see change in the tyre.
I usually get rims to less than 15 thou in all directions (I am an engineer) but it can take some time to achieve that and I have sometimes left a wheel and gone back to it the following day. As Peter says, up & down is more important so you don't want an oval shaped wheel.
I have found no difference between truing a stainless rim or chromed steel rim, but I have found old rims are the hardest to do. I don't know if they take a particular set over the years.

Simon
 

Robert Watson

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VOC Member
I have built in the neighbourhood of 25+ rims. Vincent, BSA R3, Nortons etc etc. best I ever did was on original Velo Thruxton flanged Dunlop rims, both ends easily under 10 thou in both directions. I usually work at them until they are close and then give all the spoke heads a light tap and leave them overnight, store up some patience and finish up the next day. 15 thou is about my max and ignore the jump where the weld is.

On the last set of Devon SS rims I did it was very difficult to even find the weld.

Some just fall together in the right spot and others like to fight you all the way. A recent certain model 7 rear with used rim and spokes was a prime example of that........ the patience bank is still a little short!
 

Chris Launders

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VOC Member
I managed to get my Norvin rims (they were akront rims, fitted in the late 80s) to below 10 thou in both side to side and round. Beware of powder coated hubs and rims, the spokes will settle into the powder coat and will want doing more than once.
 

Albervin

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VOC Member
Thanks guys. I am down to about 10 though run-out side to side. A bit trickier getting roundness down but I haven't given up, yet.
 

Robert Watson

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VOC Member
Roundness is your friend, much easier to balance!

I got a Comet that you could not ride, at 50 MPH the rear wheel literally bounced off the ground and the front was a 410 - 21 which had a mind of its own, and when I asked how true the wheels were the PO said he had done them close to 1/8 run out. It had very wide bars on it as you needed them to try and turn the front wheel. They are still a bit long even tho' I took 3 in off the, changed the front to a 300-20 and trued the rear to something reasonable and balanced the whole plot
 

MSVH Y3

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VOC Member
Another thing to consider is getting the hub centered in the rim side to side. Use a long straight edge across the end of hub and check distance to rim edges top and bottom, front to back etc. then check the other hub end.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Another thing to consider is getting the hub centered in the rim side to side. Use a long straight edge across the end of hub and check distance to rim edges top and bottom, front to back etc. then check the other hub end.
When I had to renew the front wheel spokes on my long term project a BMW defazio hub center steerer I was faced with rebuilding a wheel without a fixed axel I found an article in the vintage motorcycle workshop which described a 'taverners jig' basically a true wheel is placed in a horizontal jig and the spindle ( hub in my case) is located in relation to the rim in all planes. I made mine with a slab of kitchen worktop angle iron and studding renewed all the spokes and tried it with a spanner and spoke tune since the final truth needed to be in the front swinging arm and include the steering bearings I was very happy with the 30 thou run out as it's a hub steerer it does not need fork accuracy. Lots of articles on the web I was told that all BSA wheels were at one time made this way to deskill the job. I guess with a conventional wheel you could easily do a final true ( if needed) in the forks
 

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