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Girdraulic lower link-application of heat?

1660bob

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Hi All. In the middle of Girdraulic fork rebuild and initial checking of the FF3 lower link indicates a touch of misalignment-a twist of about 1mm across the width of the rear eyes.Not a lot but enough to warrant a tilt at rectification.I believe this is a forged component, and in order to straighten i intend to jig it up and use a oxy acet torch to heat a section of one of the arms to ease it back- is this accepted practice/ any known problems with local heating of this link? Cheers, Bob
 

John Appleton

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Hi All. In the middle of Girdraulic fork rebuild and initial checking of the FF3 lower link indicates a touch of misalignment-a twist of about 1mm across the width of the rear eyes.Not a lot but enough to warrant a tilt at rectification.I believe this is a forged component, and in order to straighten i intend to jig it up and use a oxy acet torch to heat a section of one of the arms to ease it back- is this accepted practice/ any known problems with local heating of this link? Cheers, Bob

Hi Bob, I did exactly what you are proposing, but the link that I was playing with was in far worse condition than your one. That was six years ago, and 25000 miles later it is still OK.
John
 
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davidd

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I would follow Robert's advice. If you need more specifics, you can contact me at daviddunfey@aol.com. I have had the luxury of a welding table and when straightening RFMs or links, it is easy for me to tack two pieces of angle iron with a hole so that I can bolt the piece in place. I use very large adjustable wrenches (Harbor Freight) because they fit tightly and do not mar. You can stack two of them togenther if need be. A large vise with soft jaws or wood is useful. Pipe can be useful, but watch for marring and you can often use wood or leather as padding. A big hammer and a piece of wood is good. A large hammer is often good because you do not have to swing it hard and you can give it a couple of raps.

If John has had good results with heating I cannot argue against it, particularly if you are comfortable with that approach. I am more comfortable coldly wacking things around.

David
 
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