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design question, rear suspension

caffel

New Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
I am fascinated by the way that the big twins are designed.
A friend gave me a copy of the fiche from the factory, but it doesn't give away a good picture of one key assembly;
the brackets that attach the gearbox to the rear swing arm.
Can anyone share an isometric drawing or another kind of view that shows how all of this fits together ?

Thanks, Charlie Affel
 

clevtrev

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I am fascinated by the way that the big twins are designed.
A friend gave me a copy of the fiche from the factory, but it doesn't give away a good picture of one key assembly;
the brackets that attach the gearbox to the rear swing arm.
Can anyone share an isometric drawing or another kind of view that shows how all of this fits together ?

Thanks, Charlie Affel
The gearbox is not attached to the swing arm. It is pivoted between the extension on the primary side crankcase, and a plate bolted to the timing side.
 

Albervin

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Ducati think they have just invented the "stressed engine member" or whatever they want to call it. Nothing is new! Most of what we know, regarding engine, frame and suspension has been around since before WWII or even earlier. The swingarm of the Vincent twin (and similarly with the single) is a marvel of shims, nuts and studs.It is imperative to get the clearances correct. I have just been through the exercise of fitting a new (60 year old) swing arm (RFM) and it was very time consuming, but satisfying, to get it just so. The end result is a well balanced machine that tracks better than most 60 year old bikes.
 
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