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Wheel Building.


glen

Website User
VOC Member
Hi, i need to replace my front rim after a accident last week.
So is the spoke pattern, on the pre-war wheels standard cross 4 vincent pattern?
Thanks.
 

Robert Watson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Standard?
Vincent?
Same breath?
I think not.
When I built my A I ordered new spokes and rims from Devon as the originals were well done. The man sent them cross 3 lacing as he (and I) had had an issue with a 19" rear on a post war machine. I gave him a right bollocking over it and when I got around to lacing it went and looked at what I am still convinced was its original rear 19 and guess what -- cross 3..... I eventually ate the slice of humble pie and apologized to the man!
 

Chris Launders

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Oh the complexities of wheel building !!!!
I went to build a Matchless back wheel on Thursday, I had stripped the wheel myself and measured the spokes, inner and outer both sides 206mm, got a new rim and spokes to fit and it wouldn't lace up, the spokes were too long for cross two and too short for cross three.
I resorted to an on-line spoke calculator program which told me cross two required 200mm spokes and cross three 212mm, I had some 212mm spokes, used those and it laced up correctly.
How could it have had 206mm spokes in it before ??????
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Here is what I used to build my last wheel the old one was complete but had rusty spokes its called a Taverners Jig . normally it would only have a small hole in the center for a wheel spindle but in this case I was building a hub center Difazio wheel (which is what got me to try this method) so I had to locate on the Hub itself having done one and found it so easy (in fact I did not have to resort to final truing as it came out of the jig perfect) I shall not be spending large amounts at wheel builders anymore -so long as I have a pattern. Look up "Taverner Jig" or look in "The Vintage motorcyclists workshop" book which is where I found it.

1535791366467.jpeg
 

greg brillus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Hi Glen I'm sorry i didn't catch you at the track day on Thursday, only found out afterward of your accident. I do remember speeding past you a couple of times on that 600 Norvin single I was riding and having a great time. The best rims in my opinion are Devon rims from the UK made entirely in the UK and exact shape profile as the original Dunlop rims in either Chrome steel or stainless. Cheers...........Greg.
 

glen

Website User
VOC Member
Hi,
Thanks for great replies, i will make a travellers jig.
And Greg it was so annoying having a accident because of a ducati rider overtaking and dropping into the corner right in front of me.
The 600 Norvin single looked like lots of fun, i will try and get a devon rim now and do a rebuild on the front and r/h side of the bike now. cheers Glen.
 

greg brillus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I heard about the Ducati thing.........was that in the lunchtime parade lap.........?..........Anyway if you need any help with anything or parts give me a call, Rodney and Neal may be of assistance too given the new "A" twins, I have worked on them..........Glen's one with the Burgundy tank was the one i built last year. Cheers..........Greg.
 

genedn

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The Book by Radco is also useful for this type of thing. I believe he has a Taverner Jig and plans for it.
 
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vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
"The book by radco" and the "Vintage motorcyclists workshop" I referred to are the same thing ( unless you know different:cool:)
 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
After an accident on my Moto Guzzi I had to rebuild both front and rear wheels. Like Vincent wheels the rims are centered on the hubs and have 40 spokes. Before stripping my damaged wheels I laid the new rim on top of the damaged one and numbered the holes on the rim to correspond to the holes on the hub. I used one red and one blue marker to indicate which side of the wheel the hole corresponded too. Numbering beginning at the inner tube hole. Additionally the Guzzi wheels are a cross one, so odds for outside and evens for inside. Just had to make sure the rim was the right way around because of the angle of the hole in the rim.
Steven
 

Jez Nemeth

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thanks for the tip with the Taverner's jig, very helpful..after a few attempts of 'Kerplonk' with the spokes finally achieved a laced front wheel and started to true it. 21" front Devon rim/spokes, so a bit easier than smaller sizes I'd suppose, did come across a problem with the Devon spokes though -nothing inherently wrong with them, far from it -but when lacing the spoke head at the hub/flange end each one appears to push against the shaft of the next exerting added pressure and bend - did I read somewhere that its a good idea to grind a small 'flat spot' on the head of each spoke to prevent contact pressure? Grind being at 10 or 2 o'clock depending on direction, head facing you, shaft vertical. I'm new to wheel building so very willing to take advice here...
 
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vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
'Taverners' not 'Travelers' Jig , The former was named after Les Tavener who evolved it (VMCC journal March 1984), the latter is allegedly a drunken dance performed amongst some very expensive caravans parked in a layby
 

Jez Nemeth

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
'Taverners' not 'Travelers' Jig , The former was named after Les Tavener who evolved it (VMCC journal March 1984), the latter is allegedly a drunken dance performed amongst some very expensive caravans parked in a layby
I see the difference now -thanx for pointing it out, had wondered :). And I can't even put that down to spell check being helpful in this instance. Anyway, any need to grab a grinder do you think and give each spoke head a flat edge at those angles?
 

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