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F: Frame Wheel bearing extraction


Chris.R

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Hi I probably asked this before but: I need to know how to get the bearing cups out of the rear hub since it is only after rebuilding the wheel I find rollers in the caged roller bearing degraded, I have bought new Timken bearings and for what it is worth mine are imperial with a spacer. What is the process of removing the bearing cup from a fully assembled wheel.

The wheels have been re-chromed, painted and assembled can the above be done without damaging the said assembly.

Chris
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have always believed that the best way to remove bearing races is with a TIG welder. If you can locate someone to do that it will be relatively easy. The welder runs a bead around the inside of the bearing race. Neatness is not important. Often as the hub heats up it will release the bearing. This is due to the fact that the weld bead, as it cools in place will make the diameter of the race smaller. The race will often knock out with light taps from a punch when the bead is done and the hub is still warm. It should also tap out easily when the whole unit is cool.

I often weld in a piece of scrap so I can tap straight down with a steel rod. I do this after welding the bead on the race.
Brearing Removal 1.jpg

Brearing Removal 2.jpg
There is no flame or spatter with TIG.

David
 

Chris.R

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thanks David that sounds so, so simple now to find a member with the required welding kit.
 

Robert Watson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have done many like that. works very well. Just pop over with the wheel and I'll tig it for you. Let's see, book a ticket, drive to airport fly, I'll pick you up in about 16 hours :) No just a minute that would be 1:30 am, I'll be there at 7
 

Chris.R

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thanks Bob for the offer Just cannot afford the added carbon footprint so will have to find someone north Surrey or Kent borders to help out.
 

Black Flash

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
You do not necessarily need a tig welder. Take your wheel to a local car garage and ask the guy to run a line of weld round the cup.
done it many times, worked all the time!
 

Robert Watson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Just on a finished wheel there is a chance of spatter either from mig or stick to hit the paint. Not so with the tig.
 

Chris.R

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Ok you are saying that MIG or arc is an acceptable method I can make a simple hardboard shield to stop the spatter getting on spokes, paint and brake drums.
 

Robert Watson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
any welding will do the job, just with the tig you don't get any little molten bits flying about! Lots of wet cloths covering precious paint will work just fine as well, although don't let me explain to her what all those little holes are in her favourite hand towel set........
 

Black Flash

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Robert,
Sorry I forgot to write to use a mig welder which is usually in any garage. Clean and degrease the cup carefully, better twice with brake cleaner and with a good ground connection there will be no spatter from a mig welder.
but you are certainly right, with a brand new wheel I would never use those horrible sticks. The spit or spatter all the time.
 

Chris.R

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have been reading up on this there are a few references on the web that say it is an old trick to weld a bead around the cup on cooling of the weld the cup will be shrunk by the weld metal and as a result often drops out with a gentle tap, at least that is what I am reading so David`s method would seem the way to go.
 

Robert Watson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Ahhh Black Flash, you must not be a cheap Bas#$%d like me, I use straight CO2 and not the CO2 Argon mix that reduces spatter with the mig.......
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Robert,
use a mig welder which is usually in any garage. Clean and degrease the cup carefully, better twice with brake cleaner
Re the brake cleaner and welding. Do a search on Google regarding “ brake cleaner welding warnings” or something close to that and you will get:

“The active chemical in the brake cleaner is tetrachloroethylene. When this chemical is exposed to excessive heat and the gas argon, which is used in MIG and TIG welding, it produces phosgene. Phosgene gas can be fatal with a dose as little as four parts per million: basically a single small puff of smoke”.
 
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vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I am old enough to remember the trike baths in the factory machine shops where I was an apprentice. Boy were those bits clean ( and hot) when you pulled them out!
Amazing what we did back then like turning batches of asbestos plungers on lathes.and smoking heath and heather herbal mixture because tobacco was too costly.and the first thing to come off the milling machine was the guard
When you think about it riding a 650 Triumph on an L plate was probably the least risky activity of the day.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
At a Jag' Garage, We used a big tin of Petrol, You know the old stuff that went BANG ! :) .
Till a Lad stepped in it, And another lad flicked a Fag' end at him, The flames were 2 feet above his head,
That Lad was Trouble, I was told he lost a Leg some years later.
 

Chris.R

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thinking engineering solutions there has to be a puller that will do the job avoiding all the welding fuss?
 

greg brillus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Most bearings drop out of the hubs..........throw them away and start again. Yes a removal tool sounds like an idea............Only there is no room to get behind the bearing, hence the weld/shrink method.
 

Marcus Bowden

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Chris R my handsome, there is an engineering solution and the VOCSC are using it.
Recently I bought a new hub to build a new front wheel for brothers "A" to have fitted Vincent Speet brake set and bought a set for me too, The new hub from the spares company came and there were two milled slots behind the bearing cup so a drifting tool could be applied, good idea I thought and did the same to the hub I used, Normally I use a sharp-edged mushroom drift as there is normally a little protruding beyond the casting and tap them out.
Bananaman.
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Bananaman is right. One of my friends makes the new hubs and he designed in the removal cut outs. They are machined from solid billet and should be superior to the original cast ones. However, this does not help the original poster who has a wheel already built up.
 

peter holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I do not want to offend Normans sensibilities more than I have to, especially after my spark plug revelations, but if you get yourself a very sharp 1/4" woodworking chisel, the blades are normally fairly long, you will be able to get to and nibble out enough soft aluminium to enable you to drift out the bearing cup, you might have to regrind and sharpen your chisel afterwards, in my working life I used to retro fit mortise locks to aluminium extruded doors, I have often tidied a keyhole or faceplate with the tap of a chisel.
 

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