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vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#1
I read in the VMCC mag that the French have made it illegal to ride a motorcycle without the (approved) gloves being worn.
How do these pen pushers get away with it? its obvious they are trying to make riding motorcycles as difficult as possible with as many intrusions on individual choice that they can dream up, and they don't really give a damm about riders hands.
I expect the rest of the EU sheep will follow.....
Well done MAG for bringing this up and good news that MAG and the BMF are starting to work together at last.
Only one question: where is the French MAG?
 

roy the mechanic

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#2
Gloves are the one thing I will not go without. When I was a teenager I had a crash(come a purler) as Dad would say, damaged leg and skinned both palms, couldn't hold the crutches. Kept me out of the boozer and housebound for weeks. Grumble, grumble. P S, no helmets then!
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#3
I wasn't suggesting to ride without gloves, I am objecting to being told to do so (Its the same as the crash helmet argument) and having to wear what some Big Nanny pen pusher thinks are suitable. ie prescribed gloves that in their opinion will make me not enjoy my riding by just that little bit (Its that government nudge policy I was talking about a week or so ago).
 

MartynG

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#4
I do so enjoy the word "Approved" for from it a swarm of EU inspectors will be born plus manufacturers being given the opertunity to charge even more for the "EU approved" items. And lets not forget the increased government revenue if you are nicked for wearing 'non approved' stuff. It never ends. No wonder you chaps voted for BREXIT.
 

highbury731

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#5
Gloves are the one thing I will not go without. When I was a teenager I had a crash(come a purler) as Dad would say, damaged leg and skinned both palms, couldn't hold the crutches. Kept me out of the boozer and housebound for weeks. Grumble, grumble. P S, no helmets then!
I once came off at speed due to oil on the road, while cornering hard. By pushing my gloved hands hard into the road, I managed to avoid going under an on-coming lorry. Try doing that without gloves.....
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#6
I
I once came off at speed due to oil on the road, while cornering hard. By pushing my gloved hands hard into the road, I managed to avoid going under an on-coming lorry. Try doing that without gloves.....
I repeat, no one is suggesting riding without gloves, read what MartynG says so much better that me. No wonder there are so many irresponsible people around they are never given any responsibility any more, Big Nanny does it all.
 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#7
I wasn't suggesting to ride without gloves, I am objecting to being told to do so (Its the same as the crash helmet argument) and having to wear what some Big Nanny pen pusher thinks are suitable. ie prescribed gloves that in their opinion will make me not enjoy my riding by just that little bit (Its that government nudge policy I was talking about a week or so ago).
That's what folks here object to, being told "you must", "it's for your own good" etc. Those who favored mandatory helmets argued that it was to reduce health care costs. Stating it costs lots of money to help someone who has traumatic brain injury from riding without a helmet. After all those pesky bikers don't have insurance to pay for stuff. That didn't fly as everyone has mandatory insurance on their vehicles and it must include personal injury protection for the operator and passenger. In the '70s we had a mandatory 55 mph maximum national speed limit on all interstates. The federal gov't here coerced state gov'ts in implementing it use by withholding federal funds for road construction and repair. The money collected by states for licensing and fuel taxes is sent into the federal gov't and re-distributed to the state gov't. That changed when a couple of states challenged the feds by 1) withholding the money and using it to repair roads directly. 2) challenging the federal gov't in court whether it could withhold public funds that are used to maintain public infrastructure unless the public acquiesced to federal demands. The courts agreed with the states, you can't do it. Little Constitution law issue there. Powers not specifically given to the federal gov't rest with the state gov'ts. That opened the door for the repeal of mandatory helmet laws across the country. As Martyn states most of these requirements are not for my protection or benefit, they are to generate revenue for someone.
Again I would not suggest riding without proper attire but I object to having it mandated to me.
Steven
 

Vincent Brake

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#8
in the end its always your own choise, weather do or dont.
i always told my childeren to wear gloves too, even when cycling summertime to school, but knew they wouldnt do it. one however did.
the purpose of typing this text is just nice, being into the cold times... i think i will go on and on....
hibernating is also a good choise
 

TouringComet

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Administrator
#9
Bought a small petrol can the other day, plastic these days of course, but now the nozzle has a piece that selects between lock and unlock, but that's not all, the nozzle also has a tang that you have to rest on the tank, and use the weight of the petrol can to push the nozzle in, to finally open the passage way for the fuel to flow. Yikes. Time to hit the yard sales to find an old style can.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#10
The one thing the pen pushers have never heard of is the law of diminishing returns once you get eighty or ninety percent adherence to a practice the amount of effort and cost to achieve each subsequent increase is out of all proportion to the gains made.
To legislators however most people complying is a signal to force compulsion they think more paperwork & inspectors= more civil servants, fines= more money and lots more profit for notice board makers,equipment makers and ambulance chasers and they always do it after a campaign to achieve what has already been accomplished -"You know it makes sense", Yes we do leave us alone!
 

highbury731

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#12
I think most people with common sense use gloves when riding. Since authority workers don't believe that the citizens have any common sense, they invent new regulations to protect the public. Probably because they see so little common sense from their coworkers.
My favourite is the riders, usually on scooters, who wear flip-flops / thongs / jandals. You know, sandal sort of things with a strap between toes. I've seen people wearing them while riding superbikes. Put your foot down to steady the bike while riding, and you end up with the strap in the bones by your ankle, and the sole ripped off, etc.
When I learned to ride, the rule was be 100% covered whenever riding.
 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#13
My favourite is the riders, usually on scooters, who wear flip-flops / thongs / jandals. You know, sandal sort of things with a strap between toes. I've seen people wearing them while riding superbikes. Put your foot down to steady the bike while riding, and you end up with the strap in the bones by your ankle, and the sole ripped off, etc.
When I learned to ride, the rule was be 100% covered whenever riding.
Commonly referred to here as "squids". Don't know why, but when I saw one and someone said it as the "squid" went by I knew what he meant and it fit. What really makes me laugh is here you will see said squid riding in shorts, flip-flops, a wife beater/tank top/muscle shirt, and a full face helmet.o_O:confused: They will be riding well and truly over the limit weaving in and out of traffic, half the time front wheel elevated. I can only surmise they either want to "Live fast, die young, and leave a good looking corpse" or they promised they mom they would always wear a helmet when on a bike.
Steven
 

Steve G

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#14
As Steven says, the term Squid is used in reference to an underdressed, (usually) young, inexperienced motorcyclist riding a sport bike in a reckless manner. The horsepower to skill ratio is way out of balance and said rider sometimes ends up on the pavement looking like a Squid; their bleeding tentacles of flesh hanging from a full face helmet. I've also heard that Squid came out of southern California surf lingo. A contraction of Squirrely Kid.
 

Jim Richardson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#15
I think that once you get into the "approved" classification a lot of people wouldn't like the styles available.
Very few of the bike jackets and trousers sold meet the EU/BS for motor cycle protective clothing, they are fashion wear.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#16
I think that once you get into the "approved" classification a lot of people wouldn't like the styles available.
Very few of the bike jackets and trousers sold meet the EU/BS for motor cycle protective clothing, they are fashion wear.
Yes but unlike gloves in France its not an offence (except good taste in some cases) to wear them
 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#17
I always wondered where the term "squid" came from. It really does fit, doesn't it. Occasionally I google "squid on a bike" or "squid on a motorcycle" out of morbid curiosity. Confirms why protective gear is good. ATGATT (All The Gear, All The Time).
Steven
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#18
ATGATTWTBTTSU
Without The B*****s Trying To Shaft Us

Mark my words another slippery slope they will legislate on all our clothing next!
talk about shoving at open doors
 

Steve G

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#19
Then there is the looming issue of the potential banning of motorcycles altogether once all of the cars are self-driving. . .
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#20
I note that female rider in Norway has already been injured by an automatic car (BMF Rider magazine)
Having written a lot of software before I returned to engineering and knowing how long it takes to get all the wrinkles out. The rush to get the auto cars on the road is very worrying.
The government would love to nudge us on to robot cars (YOU know it makes sense) they must be made to realise sometimes its for the journey not the destination. After all if it were not so no-one would ride horses any more would they?
Do you support MAG or the BMF?
 


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