• Welcome to the website of the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club.

    Should you have any questions relating to the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club, or Vincent H.R.D. motorcycles in general, please contact Graham Smith, Hon. Editor and Webmaster by calling 07977 001 025 or please CLICK HERE.

    You are unrecognised, and therefore, only have VERY restricted access to the many features of this website.

    If you have previously registered to use this forum, you should log in now. CLICK HERE.

    If you have never registered to use this website before, please CLICK HERE.

H: Hubs, Wheels and Tyres Torque setting for rear hubs.....

Bowsh

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#1
Hi All,

Can anyone please tell me what I should be tightening my rear hub to? Rapide series C.

Thanks

Paul
 

Bowsh

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#6
never used a torque wrench in the 50 +years of owning my shadow. its done by feel.
I’ve not been fortunate enough to own a Vincent for 50+ years. I’ve had mine for 6 months and it’s a very steep learning curve:)
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#7
There are NO torque figures for the Vincent with the possible exception of the head nuts and since that is not official it ranges between 30 and 32 ft lbs.(70 years ago Newton was just an observer of apples and meters were in a cupboard under the stairs)
Back then nobody in the motorcycle trade needed tourque spanner and few used more than the contents of a toolbox
 

greg brillus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#8
Getting back to actually helping the guy................Ok.........the nuts are obviously thin, so using a socket is difficult unless you machine the bevel off the face of the socket. You can use a pair of 12 inch shifting spanners, it is a good idea to hold the brake arm to the "Actuated Position" then nip the thin nut up firm, then do the same for the other side making sure the two brake plates are in the same position, so the arms and torque stay anchors align when you refit the wheel assembly. Just a firm nip up on each nut is plenty, if you apply too much torque you will likely round off the edges of the nut...............around 15 to 20 Ft Lb's max.
 

mercurycrest

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#9
I’ve not been fortunate enough to own a Vincent for 50+ years. I’ve had mine for 6 months and it’s a very steep learning curve:)
I usually tighten the E80's by locking the brake with one hand on one side and pulling the other side with the other hand until they tighten when both sides are aligned to fit into the forks... I don't reef on it hard either.
 

Bowsh

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#11
Getting back to actually helping the guy................Ok.........the nuts are obviously thin, so using a socket is difficult unless you machine the bevel off the face of the socket. You can use a pair of 12 inch shifting spanners, it is a good idea to hold the brake arm to the "Actuated Position" then nip the thin nut up firm, then do the same for the other side making sure the two brake plates are in the same position, so the arms and torque stay anchors align when you refit the wheel assembly. Just a firm nip up on each nut is plenty, if you apply too much torque you will likely round off the edges of the nut...............around 15 to 20 Ft Lb's max.
Thank you Greg, that was really helpful.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#12
Get some old nuts and bolts and your normal spanners get the feel of tightening see the difference lubrication does to your 'feel' .
Lubrication or lack of it will cause havoc with those quoted torque figures all set with specific lubrication new torque spanners and new nuts and bolts none of which may apply to your situation.
 
Top