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F: Frame Tool tray position and fixing


doctired

Active Website User
VOC Member
Hi, Sorry to be a bore, I have owned my 49 Rap for many years now but it never had a tool tray. I bought a lovely s/s one from the club spares but the slider base is undrilled and the mounting point probably has half an inch of flexibility. I should like to fix it using the correct fixings in the correct place in an authentic fashion. Do any of the bretheren have any advice on this one? Thank you for your help. The devil is in the detail...
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I don't think they will mark your card for the mounting. The last stock seat I made had nuts welded to the seat stiffener so the four screws that would hold the slider base could be removed. Once removed, the slider base can be lined up to your liking.
Stock Seat 1.jpgWhen flipped over the seat looks like this:
Stock Seat 6.jpg
My base slider was pre-drilled, and was not drilled correctly. I chose two holes and drilled the others rather than make more of a project out an already complicated project. But, you can see the slider base is not centered. It may not need centering. I would install the tray on the slider base and see where you want it when assembled. Also, consider some type of securing or locking mechanism. Nothing fancy is necessary, but a simple key lock can be installed on either end' I believe, and a slot installed in the slider base. The tang of the lock can be modified to fit what you wish to do.
Tool Tray Lock.PNG

David
 

b'knighted

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Fitting a similar lock was the first thing I ever did on my first Comet. About three weeks later I managed to get the tray open. The second job I did was to fit a guard in the tray to prevent the tools from sliding under the lock and preventing the locking bar from exiting the slot in the seat base.
 

doctired

Active Website User
VOC Member
Dear Sir,
You are a very kind man who has told me exactly what I need to know. The slider is undrilled but the seat has the original 1949 fixings. (I naively imagine...!!) The prob is that there is no guidance. Similar to cable routing....
Thank you
John
 

doctired

Active Website User
VOC Member
Fitting a similar lock was the first thing I ever did on my first Comet. About three weeks later I managed to get the tray open. The second job I did was to fit a guard in the tray to prevent the tools from sliding under the lock and preventing the locking bar from exiting the slot in the seat base.
Thanks bud. I will eventually show up at Morchard on the Rap. Hopefully Sept!!!
 

chankly bore

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Fitting a similar lock was the first thing I ever did on my first Comet. About three weeks later I managed to get the tray open. The second job I did was to fit a guard in the tray to prevent the tools from sliding under the lock and preventing the locking bar from exiting the slot in the seat base.
These locks are probably available in the U.K. from purveyors of caravan equipment. A shakeproof washer of suitable size under the nut is another nifty wheeze
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
For Brampton fork owners a Yamaha moped tool box screw can be used to hold the tray in place and matches the damper knob in minature.
I always used a magnet on a bracket to give that extra restraint now only stainless trays are available I have to add my own piece of steel on the side to match
I have enough keys in my life not to add more:)
 

b'knighted

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thanks bud. I will eventually show up at Morchard on the Rap. Hopefully Sept!!!
Hi Doc,

Our September meeting is this Sunday, tomorrow as I write and, if the Rap isn’t ready yet, we'd be pleased to meet you using any other means of transport.

Next month is our Autumn Meet at Coombe Martin.
 

b'knighted

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Our September meeting was this Sunday and the Rap was ready. If you hadn't told us about the tool tray we wouldn't have noticed that it wasn't there.
A pleasure to meet you and I hope you can make it to our Autumn Meet at Coombe Martin, first weekend in October.Rapide Left.JPGRapide right_5611.JPG
 

doctired

Active Website User
VOC Member
A wonderful hour spent in the company of true gentlemen with embarrassing levels of knowledge. And lovely, long suffering partners. Thank yo so much all, for a delightful reception on my return to the group after a rebuild. See you all asap. December looks a hope. Electrics fun on way back!!!
Thank you green flag!!!! Oh the shame!.....
 

chankly bore

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
If my old eyes don't deceive, you have return springs on both front brake arms. Usually fitted on r.h.s. only, otherwise function of balance beam stop is negated. Maximum leverage of arms is just as arm and cable form a right angle. Keep your rear stand bolts and nuts (F69 and F27) fairly tight on their Thackeray washers, you don't want to set up any vibration in that tart-tray rearward of the seat, particularly if you have alloy guards. A pretty bike, enjoy it.
 

b'knighted

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
No balance beam is fitted. The brake lever has a built in whiffle tree (possibly Royal Enfield) and the bridge plate is flared to carry cable abutments with adjusters outboard of the blades. Front brake arms are long but lever travel is short and feels extremely firm.
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Not a criticism but hopefully a helpful comment; your rear carrier is likely to cause trouble. It is un-sprung and bounces up and down with the rear wheel etc. Anything light is likely to be ejected, anything heavy will cause something to fracture. If you to not want to use the rather ugly 'Forth Bridge' type of support used by many then a carrier can be cantilevered over supports placed inside the top of the two friction damper arms and the upwards reaction taken by a shallow 'U' shaped bracket placed just behind your new tool tray.
 

ray vinmad

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The rack will not only go up & down, it will also rotate towards the seat and it looks to me as though it would bury itself into the back of the seat on a full bump. As it's on a centre stand, the suspension is fully extended in the pictures.
If a pillion passenger had their hands in the way, that could easily end with broken bones.
Put the bike on the rear stand, grab the lifting handle in one hand & the centre of the handlebars in the other & pull together. That will indicate the action.
Put a jack under the engine, take off the rear springs & lower the bike via the jack to full `bump' on the damper. That will show how close it will get.
Ray
 

doctired

Active Website User
VOC Member
Not a criticism but hopefully a helpful comment; your rear carrier is likely to cause trouble. It is un-sprung and bounces up and down with the rear wheel etc. Anything light is likely to be ejected, anything heavy will cause something to fracture. If you to not want to use the rather ugly 'Forth Bridge' type of support used by many then a carrier can be cantilevered over supports placed inside the top of the two friction damper arms and the upwards reaction taken by a shallow 'U' shaped bracket placed just behind your new tool tray.
Thanks. I looked at the rear rack it arrived with, agreed and removed it. Looks so much better and easier to polish. Cheers
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have built quick detachable racks to be bolted onto the back of the seat. This was many years ago, but I think I welded some round tubes to the bottom side of the seat frame at the back. They ended at the seat and were not very noticable. I welded in two weldable tube ends. These could hold a rack or be closed off with a SS bolt.

I did the same thing when building Egli frames. The original Eglis did not have a loop frame on the back where the seat is. There were two straight tubes instead. Egli flattened the end of the tube and drilled two holes in the flat to attach a mudguard stay. I welded on some threaded tube ends so a mudguard bracket and/or a rack could be bolted on.

DSCN0672.JPG

They are available in many sizes. Often called "weldable threaded tube ends" or "tubing threaded inserts".



David
 

stu spalding

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Getting back to the start of this thread, if a luggage rack is to be used in future it is no bad thing to extend the inner bits of angle iron to pick up on the mounting bracket ends of the outer frame while the seat is in kit form, in fact I've often wondered why this wasn't done originally. Cheers, Stu.
 

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