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T: Fuel Tank Tank repair help

Herman-Handlebars

Active Website User
VOC Member
Hi all,
After removing the flaking paint from my tank, found 2 dents filled with a load of filler. Fair enough, its of an age but after many cups of tea I'm unsure of how to tackle straightening out the dents. I don't really want to filler them in again, and would like to repair and push them out straight again.
Hoping someone may have tackled this before?
My thinking so far is: 1. as the dents are opposite the filler neck, a pusher rod and heat couldn't be done due to not having the access, without making access, as the tunnel is in the way 2. Possibly cut a small access hole in the base of the tank to get said pusher rod and heat to massage the dents out. 3. Carefully cut out the dents and form 2 new curved panels to be brazed/tig'ed back in.
Or pay someone handsomely to sort it out and entrust them with making the right call!

Would appreciate any help with the right way forward, thanks in advance.
 

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Jim Bush

Active Website User
VOC Member
I started a tank repair thread a while back - my original tank had been opened up twice before, and was really at the end of its life - I persevered with repair, including third opening, re-brazing. After pressure testing, sealing with redkote and painting - the first tank full of gas pin pointed a minor leak from rust behind one of the original braze repairs. Very disappointed - required another application of redkote sealer and it has been fine these last three months.

In the meantime - I purchased an Indian made tank, it arrived during the Covid lockdown. I am impressed with the overall quality, clean new metal, good welds, proper shape and it fit perfectly. Same can't be said for all Indian made tanks - If you are interested I can forward the link to the seller. For $300 it is certainly a easy fix. I will keep the original tank as a spare..
 

clevtrev

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Some of the other videos that accompanied the one posted by Bill Thomas are really instructive, I had not realised that the work these chaps are doing was even possible, or some of the tools used. If you did not view some of them them then I recommend that you do. It is clearly a skill which can be learnt and has tools which could be copied.
It can be learnt, that`s why tin bashers did a seven year apprenticeship when I was doing five years as a toolmaker.
 

mercurycrest

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Talking about tanks, can someone let me know what code/number or name colour of the maroon "A" tanks were please as I just about to give Old Harry a facelift, Christine has seen what a lovely job Pau Adams did on the Comet tank so she wants the same on the Rap. Thank you sorry for butting in but not sure how to start a thread.
bananaman.
Hi Marcus, It's Ford Imperial Maroon code AZ.
Give Christine a hug from us.
Cheers, John
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I quite fancy Maroon for a Comet has any one done a Maroon post war Vincent?
I saw an early pre production illustration of a series B in Maroon
Contemporary Triumphs were often Arbarth Red which is only a shade away
I bought a navy blue Rapide in 1963 and I have heard of the Chinese red ones but not Maroon...
 

Herman-Handlebars

Active Website User
VOC Member
You have the advantage, (I guess), of having to repaint anyway, but here are pictures of my tank before and after, and the paint was saved through this technique. I would not be so sure it is impossible to reach the dents over the tunnel as these guys are pretty ingenious, but in your case it may be more cost effective to cut an access hole.

Thanks Oldhaven, that was some challenge! A fine job nicely done I agree with yourself and Greg, with an access hole is the way forward. Thanks for your advice, and link to your tank repair. Cheera
 

Herman-Handlebars

Active Website User
VOC Member
I started a tank repair thread a while back - my original tank had been opened up twice before, and was really at the end of its life - I persevered with repair, including third opening, re-brazing. After pressure testing, sealing with redkote and painting - the first tank full of gas pin pointed a minor leak from rust behind one of the original braze repairs. Very disappointed - required another application of redkote sealer and it has been fine these last three months.

In the meantime - I purchased an Indian made tank, it arrived during the Covid lockdown. I am impressed with the overall quality, clean new metal, good welds, proper shape and it fit perfectly. Same can't be said for all Indian made tanks - If you are interested I can forward the link to the seller. For $300 it is certainly a easy fix. I will keep the original tank as a spare..
Thanks Jim, I read your thread kindly pointed out by Oldhaven, some challage that was. I admire you perseverance!
I may go to an Indian tank, with the positive responses on this forum have said is very encouraging. My tank at the moment looks in fare condition just the large dents on one side. Hoping with a heavy clean and access hole cutting the rest will be serviceable. I won't count my chickens just yet mind! haha
Thanks for your advice and tank thread
Cheers
 

Jim Bush

Active Website User
VOC Member
It may well be worth the effort to repair your tank, even with cutting open the bottom - at least it will the first time and I am sure done properly it will be a good long term fix. My original tank was beyond repair in reality - it fits poorly due the effects of the all the braised repairs, was done only as a stop gap, but it actually looks OK from on top. I am halfway through painting the Indian tank which will be my daily.
 

Sakura

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
It can be learnt, that`s why tin bashers did a seven year apprenticeship when I was doing five years as a toolmaker.
Tin bashing looks deceptively simple, until you try it on something important. Only to easy to stretch the metal and end up with an unwanted bulge. It's easier to fill a dent than shrink a stretch.
 

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