Swarf Generator

Oldhaven

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Not only no human hands doing the machining, the machine code is written automatically from the model, and the model is done on a sophisticated CAD program. Somebody has to load the tool holder I guess.
 

Jim Richardson

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when I go round a modern machine shop, there is hardly anything that I recognise from my apprenticeship.
A lot of flat parts that would have been milled, I now have laser cut.
 

bmetcalf

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Not only no human hands doing the machining, the machine code is written automatically from the model, and the model is done on a sophisticated CAD program. Somebody has to load the tool holder I guess.

I had assumed a human had something to do with the order of the individual operations. Does the overall program know automatically (just dreaming up possibilities)
  1. how to go from the rough cuts on the rod journals to corner fillets to polishing or
  2. selecting the right cutoff tool between two throws or
  3. when to drill the diagonal lube holes or
  4. when to turn the piece around in the chuck or
  5. when to use the steady rest
Disclosure: The only time I've used a lathe was at a summer job where it was pretty automated and I was just there to put in and remove pieces to be chamfered.
 

Mike 40M

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Suddenly I feel very old and outdated.
Some 35 years ago when I modified a CNC-lathe with automated program, parts, tools and chuck jaws changes and optical tool checks, that was state of the art.
I admire the number of solutions that they have made in this machine.
 

vibrac

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The other day I had to file a square (I don't have a mill :eek:) and I was reminded of my first file test piece at Chesham Technical school day release back in 1959. Then I was reminded of one of the teachers who arrived daily on to my eyes a vintage motorcycle. It was Eddie Stevens on his Comet -my first view of a Vincent.
 

ClassicBiker

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I had assumed a human had something to do with the order of the individual operations. Does the overall program know automatically (just dreaming up possibilities)
  1. how to go from the rough cuts on the rod journals to corner fillets to polishing or
  2. selecting the right cutoff tool between two throws or
  3. when to drill the diagonal lube holes or
  4. when to turn the piece around in the chuck or
  5. when to use the steady rest
Disclosure: The only time I've used a lathe was at a summer job where it was pretty automated and I was just there to put in and remove pieces to be chamfered.
Bruce,
All good questions. Having been employed by Siemens PLM Software for going on 23 years I can answer these. Siemens sell among other softwares NX which has a CAD, a CAM, A Drawing and an Inspection module. The CAD version, quite obviously is the Computer Aided Design module. The designer of the component only needs to be concerned with the finished component. The sizes and dimensions, the GD&T (Geometric Dimensions and Tolerance), and the material used for the component. This information referred to as PMI, Product Manufacturing Information, can then be passed to the Drawing Module, which will create, with some user input, industry standard drawings for distribution either hard copy or electronic. The PMI can also be passed to the CAM module, Computer Aided Manufacturing, which comes complete with a large number of currently available standard machines, holding fixtures/devices, and tools. The individual processing the design through the manufacturing process then decides which steps with what tools in what order. Specialty tools and holding fixtures can be created in the CAD module then stored appropriate libraries for use. A tool path can be generated, depth of cuts, feeds and speeds are all programmable, even the rough un-machined blank can be simulated to see material removal simulated. This allows a process engineer to make sure that the tools do not collide with holding fixtures. If the machine used has an auto tool changer this the tool changes can be programmed. If the program indicates a tool collision or a movement out of range it will give a warning. If the feeds and speeds selected are in conflict a warning will be issued. The CAM module can be set up to do simple milling and turning up to six axis machining. When the designer is ready he can then post process all the commands into "G" code for the CNC station to use in the manufacture of the desired part.

The PMI can also be passed to the inspection module where an inspector can program a CMM in the same fashion post process DMIS (industry standard language for CMMs) and inspect the completed part. The PMI can also be passed to a software called VisMockup which will create the part in a format called JT and the GD&T is used to do a statistical analysis to determine whether the capabilities of the manufacturing process combined with the tolerances of the parts will meet the manufacturing requirements. The data collected from the actual inspection of the part on the cmm can be fed back into VisMockup for comparison to determine the validity of the analysis and the accuracy of the assumptions of the process capabilities. Thus making future assumptions of process capabilities more accurate.

The entire modules do not take up that much space either. I have all four modules sitting on the laptop that I'm writing this post. I also have usual Microsoft packages on here, which they are compatible with, and in the case of VisMockup I have both 32 and 64 bit version and two different releases of because of the customers is bill my time to. The limiting factor for anyone wishing to use the stuff is the cost of the licenses. As I'm employed by Siemens I get the licenses for free and only have to update annually.
Steven
 
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