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Stoning cam followers

SteveF

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I've striped out the timing side to see how things are. A couple of the cam followers are showing a slight score line on one edge caused, I think, because the followers were previously installed without the required thrust washers and so, I am guessing, were slightly overhanging the cams.
I've checked the cams carefully and their faces look fine.

So, sounds like a bit of 'stoning' is required to remove this slightly raised area. It's really very small, so doesn't warrant replacement of the followers. Stoning would seem to be the solution.

I've never done this so I'm wondering:
- is this something you do by hand or does it need a machine?
- if I can do it by hand, what sort of stone is required? I have some water stones, will these do?

Cheers - Steve
 

greg brillus

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I think it is referring to an oil stone, but I would lightly dress off the ridge with a small sanding barrel in a dremel, or similar to remove only enough material to level the follower, you are correct in that the followers need to align with the cam lobes as best you can...just shim them with whatever amount you need and not necessarily by the book, as every engine is different. Cheers......Greg.
 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Stoning is a hand operation. You can purchase various "grit" of stones at tool suppliers i.e. Enco, Production Tool, MSF, etc.. some use oil, some water, some do not use any lubricant at all. Whether use a stone or a dremel as Greg suggests, go slowly and check often you don't want to remove to much material or change the profile of the follower.
Steven
 

SteveF

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Thanks all, just what I needed to understand.
I'll start with my finest waterstone and see how it goes. This normally leaves a very shiny finish smooth on my knives and removes very little material so sounds like it will be suitable.

Cheers - Steve
 
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