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Steering friction damper

Panama

Forum Website User
VOC Member
I am in the process of fitting the so-called 'late series C' steering damper, which incorporates two friction discs.

I am planning to have a small bit of stainless steel welded across the open end of the slot in the flat disc so that the disc with the ears will not slip out of alignment.

Does anyone have any other advice to offer regarding this upgrade.

I am also curious to know how effective this upgrade will be. Does it substantially increase the amount of friction available?
 

Black Flash

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Peter Barker made up some perfect twin disc dampers in stainless. why try to reinvent the wheel when you can get them easily.
he is on here as A-Hrd

Bernd
 

Martyn Goodwin

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I purchase a twin disk damper conversion kit from Coventry Spares - their part # is FF24KIT but it comes without the friction Disks FF37, you order them seperatly. With a fine drill I put holes in the 2 ears and also into the central lug that goes between them then installed some lock wire. This conversion provides a much stronger , more progressive and reliable steering damper.

If you want to provide a complete up to date approach to improving the front end's resistane to head shake, that cannot be detected externally, you may also consider fitting a tapered roller converion set of head stem bearings - as I have done. These two changes, together have made my Comet very stable and predictable. These kits are advertised from time to time in MPH.

Martyn
 

Panama

Forum Website User
VOC Member
Thanks for all of the helpful advice. I fitted the double disc steering damper yesterday and tested it. It does definitely provide a lot more resistance than the old single disc damper.

I will look into the tapered bearing conversion, as suggested.

Great to have so many people with first hand experience to give advice.
 

greg brillus

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Just make sure to keep grease and oil well away from any friction disc type of damper, especially after a service to the front end, as gravity and wind will direct the excess straight onto the damper rendering it useless......cheers...Greg.
 

jim burgess

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Does anyone have experience of fitting the hydraulic damper conversion? I am thinking of the type developed by Reg? Bolton and in forty years. I bought the Kawasaki damper, but it came with no bearing in the rod ends, what does it need? I already have a bracket to fit to the cylinder head and I am hoping to fit the full kit this autumn any pointers/hint/tips?
Cheers
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Hello Jim, Do you mean it has no rubber bushes with steel tube in the middle, I think they call it metalastic ?. I use Kawa' style dampers, It is a good idea to put a penny washer on the open side of the bush, Just in case the rubber comes loose. Are you fitting it to a standard Vin' or a Norvin ? Good luck, Bill.
 

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Look at the Comet version on p. 289 of 40YO. Reg's version is on p.17 of A10Y. I have fitted one, but haven't "tested" it yet with a tank slapper. I drilled the bolt at the fork end for a split pin. Fixing the nut at the other end has been a challenge. Blue loctite is working for now. the damper and bracket can be left as an assembly to be lifted off the studs when you have to remove the head bracket underneath, so a better method could be used with more room provided. The head bracket could be made to offset the turned down flange more for more clearance on the backside, but then the bracket has to be relieved to keep the body from hitting it.

Does anyone have experience of fitting the hydraulic damper conversion? I am thinking of the type developed by Reg? Bolton and in forty years. I bought the Kawasaki damper, but it came with no bearing in the rod ends, what does it need? I already have a bracket to fit to the cylinder head and I am hoping to fit the full kit this autumn any pointers/hint/tips?
Cheers
 
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