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Stainless spoke flange orientation

GBewley

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I have some older stock stainless spoke flanges. The individual spoke slots have a clearance detent ground into the slot, one at each end of the slot but on opposite sides of the flange. Do any of you know whether this clearance is there for the head of the spoke to rest in or for the curve of the spoke? Would appreciate guidance!

Thanks,

GB
 

clevtrev

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I have some older stock stainless spoke flanges. The individual spoke slots have a clearance detent ground into the slot, one at each end of the slot but on opposite sides of the flange. Do any of you know whether this clearance is there for the head of the spoke to rest in or for the curve of the spoke? Would appreciate guidance!

Thanks,

GB

Never such a thing as a stock stainless spoke flange.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
My guess its for the head, nesting there would ease the clearance for the sharp bend
To be fair I am trying to remember I have seen this before but a long time ago without seeing its hard to say
 

chankly bore

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Main problem with new spokes is clearance,viz;spokes with head on outside must not touch brake drum when bolts are tightened (H19).If using standard across 4 lacing pattern some heavier guage spokes just touch the head of the spoke on the next slot.This can cause dangerous local stress, particularly in a rear wheel.The head of the contacted spoke may be lightly relieved to avoid this.Some manufacturers give the spokes too broad a sweep coming out of the flange which gives rise to these problems.Do a trial lacing and check for all these problems.You may need to "fettle"the bend on either the inner or outer spokes to get them sitting right.I would use the clearance slot for the head and see how everything sits.Cheers, F5AB/2A/7945
 

vince998

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I have some older stock stainless spoke flanges. The individual spoke slots have a clearance detent ground into the slot, one at each end of the slot but on opposite sides of the flange. Do any of you know whether this clearance is there for the head of the spoke to rest in or for the curve of the spoke? Would appreciate guidance!

Thanks,

GB

Talking to Reinhardt from the NW German section recently, he fitted "new" stainless spoke flanges without the little detents, and has had spokes breaking at the point where they touch the corner left on his flanges. (on an outfit, so this could be contributing)
Sounds like somebody has put the right amount of work into yours :D
 

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Now that you mention it, it might be a good idea to relieve them a bit if there is contact. Peter Barker is a fan of close attention at the flanges. As one of the top guys says, "Almost right is wrong." Not me, I just slap it together.:)
 

vincenttwin

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I broke about 15 spokes on my Vincent I keep in England ,found the new brake drums were pushing on the spokes after fitting Peters shims all has been well.
cheers
peter allen
 

Black Flash

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Peter Barker really is the man you have to talk to.
He will happily sell you the shims he manufactures. He also solved the problem of spokes touching other spokes heads nearby on a 4 lace pattern by grinding a little flat at those spokes head.
His mandra really is:" almost right is wrong" I can assure you.
He also has pictures that explain everything.

cheers
Bernd
 
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