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Spark plug gap gauge


bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I lost my gap gauge recently and am trying to replace it. For my mag-sparked plugs, I need one with .018” wire probes (?) and all the new ones I can find are much bigger.

Any suggestions?
 

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The electrode bending claw is needed, this is the type I had, but probably bought in the '70's.

 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
After looking on several auto sites I found the current crop of gauges start at 0.40". Those that start at less than that usually start at 0.20". The first two I found on evil bay start at 0.015" I couldn't see if they had 0.018" or skipped it. The last one is like one I bought off of evil bay a little while ago and I know it has a 0.018" blade. In the listing it even shows that particular blade.
Steven



 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Ok. I have never seen one of those. When I want to bend an electrode I use a small screw driver and gently bend the electrode upwards and then keep checking with the feeler gauge until if it is about right. If the gap is too large then I use a very small hammer to gently tap downwards.
 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Wow, Ducbsa on Triumphrat.net lost his gauge as well. Coincidence? I think not. There is serial gauge napper out there people. :eek: Lock up you spark plug gauges people or you could be next.o_O Or perhaps Bruce has found a replacement, Ducbsa posted his plight 40 minutes after Bruce posted his, Hmmmm. Now here is the most outlandish theory...........Ducbsa and Bruce are the same person and posted on two forums in a hope to possibly finding that which he seeks. Nah, that'd be really crazy.
Steven

1571238113739.png
 

peter holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have to say, that device looks like a huge over complication to me, as Norman states a decent set of feeler gauges is all you really need, an 18 thou one is more than man enough to tease the gap open, and the side of the feeler gauge set good enough to tap the gap closed a little.
 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Well even the KLG feeler set has the little gap tool. It would seem plug manufactures think hooking the ground electrode and opening and closing by leveraging against the steel body is better than applying pressure to the center electrode and risking damage to the insulation. Just saying......
Steven

1571240411048.png
 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Correct. Hook the ground electrode and bend it by applying pressure to the plug body to open or close the gap. Not by forcing an object between the ground and center electrode. Doing so may apply a sideways force to the center electrode that may in turn damage the insulation surrounding it.

1571242568414.png The tool can also be used to close the gap, but I admit I just as often tap the ground electrode against the anvil portion of my bench vice.
Steven
 

peter holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have a stash of KLG FE70 spark plugs that I purchased years ago when they were readily available, they are far exceeding my expectations, seem to last forever, if they continue to function I do not replace them, I have cleaned, checked and adjusted them on numerous occasions, using my trusty feeler gauges I have never bent or damaged the centre electrode or the ceramic insulation. PS been doing it for 54 years.
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
No! One should never lever against the central electrode in order to bend the earth electrode. I use a small screwdriver levered against the side of the ring at the end of the plug, i.e. the hole, Anyone stupid enough to use the central electrode as a pivot should not be riding an old bike.
 

Albervin

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Better put my bike up for sale then, I will be sad to see it go, I have only owned for 54 years, and never had a KLG plug let me down yet.
Peter, it is amazing when we find out we have done it wrong for all of those decades and yet we survived. I am still surprised that I am still alive sometimes. Then again I spent several years without a seatbelt in my car, I rode a bicycle without wearing a helmet and I admit I did drink and ride. I still find my assortment of hammers (I have as many as I have bikes) indispensable.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Why would anyone wear a cycling helmet, I really can't see the point, it takes away all the excitement of an over the handle bars crash!
From what I have seen of the superanuated egg boxes the guys round here wear on rides they would do little to save a face forward crash. Not that I need an egg box I swore two things when I was 16 never ride a push bike again (I was raised on the Chiltern Hills and uncle had a push bike shop) and never wear short trousers again (De rigueur wear at infants school)
 

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