soda blasting

vibrac

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VOC Member
I finally have enough jobs to make a soda blaster worth buying if I can get one at the right price- I have seen all these DIY jobs on youtube but I wonder if anyone can share experience of a ready made item -complete gun and container ready to go.
I also believe that its worth getting the right soda so any advice on competitive supplier would also help
UK based and I have a large compressor and pipes
 

BigEd

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VOC Forum Moderator
I finally have enough jobs to make a soda blaster worth buying if I can get one at the right price- I have seen all these DIY jobs on youtube but I wonder if anyone can share experience of a ready made item -complete gun and container ready to go.
I also believe that its worth getting the right soda so any advice on competitive supplier would also help
UK based and I have a large compressor and pipes
Elixir Garden Supplies sell 5Kg for around £12.00 on ebay. This is food grade so if you can find "industrial" grade it will probably be cheaper especially if you buy in bulk.
 

timetraveller

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VOC Member
I borrowed Dick Sherwin's soda blaster a couple of weeks ago to help a fellow Vincent owner clean up his crankcases, heads etc. This is a proper piece of amateur equipment with its own soda reservoir. First it is slow. It took the two of us about four + hours to do the job. Secondly it is messy and you will need to have goggles and an air mask to keep the dust out of your mouth. I treated the excess soda as a way of killing weeds on my drive. Thirdly it might seem like a good idea to buy cheap baking soda but the makers of the kit we used warns that such soda is hygroscopic and will absorb water and clog the machine easily. All soda is hygroscopic but instead they recommend treated soda which is more water proof, and more expensive, than the standard stuff. You might also like to think about having a water separator in the air line. I drained my air reservoir the day before doing the job and yet by the end of the job the gun was spraying water as well as soda. By using the treated soda this was not a problem. Finally my compressor is a 14 cu ft /minute job with a decent sized air reservoir and yet we has to pause every now and then to let the air pressure build up. We found that at about 90 psi the blasting process was reasonably rapid but if the pressure dropped to 60 psi it was barely working. It is really important to completely empty the soda reservoir at the end of the job or you will find that you have a blockage which is difficult to remove.
 

macvette

Well Known and Active Forum User
Non-VOC Member
I finally have enough jobs to make a soda blaster worth buying if I can get one at the right price- I have seen all these DIY jobs on youtube but I wonder if anyone can share experience of a ready made item -complete gun and container ready to go.
I also believe that its worth getting the right soda so any advice on competitive supplier would also help
UK based and I have a large compressor and pipes
Frost.co.uk sell it 25kg a shot. Food grade is useless
Mac
 

Cyborg

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VOC Member
Dishwasher.jpg

Remember to wash them thoroughly afterwards.
 

Cyborg

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VOC Member
Actually that's not my kid. Mine are older and have moved out. If things do get out of hand, I can always go and impose on them..... but no worries so far. My lovely bride did get a little cranky because the cases were previously cleaned with paint stripper and although they were thoroughly rinsed off before they went in the dishwasher.... they did make a bit of a stink during the drying cycle. She came home before I had a chance to air the house out. A few days later she even shrugged her shoulders and said "whatever" and stood by while I heated the cases in the oven to help facilitate the removal of stubborn ET158. Other than my propensity for using household appliances for motorcycle repairs, I'm fairly well behaved and more or less house broken, so don't really see why she would/should make a fuss anyway. Just to be a good sport, tomorrow I'm going to pick up my own oven for the shop. Baking powder coated parts in her oven, might impart some strange flavour.
 

nkt267

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VOC Member
Baking powder coated parts in her oven, might impart some strange flavour.
NO. Baking powder liberally sprinkled in the oven is a good way to stop the grease sticking:D..Well known tip from my older customers:)..John
 
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