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Recommendation for a lock

BlackLightning998

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Hi All,

I'm in the market for a chain/lock for the Vincent to use when I go to rallies/events and the bike does not stay in view.

I'd like something portable and easily carried on the bike, I have a squire 2 metre chain and padlock for the garage but it really is not something you'd want to take with you on a run.

Recommendations and also chosen suppliers who offer a good deal would be welcome.

Many thanks to all.

Stuart
 

Tom Gaynor

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Locks

What I have read is that the kind of locks with circular keys (like Kryptonite bicycle locks) can easily be opened by pushing a Bic ballpoint pen (less refill, one assumes) into the lock. Kryptonite put an ad in the Cleethorpes Pigeon Fancier's Gazette publicising this and offering free replacements to anyone who managed to find out about it.........only part of that is true. I've always found the magazine "Ride" good on product reviews. Pop down to W & H Smug and browse a copy to see what they say. My confidence in "Ride" is based on a test they did on rider safety. I have to paraphrase, but basically they found that drinking 3 pints of Stella didn't impair ability half as much as getting bloody frozen, a politically incorrect conclusion that 1) has the ring of truth about it and 2) was backed up by solid evidence. Unlike anything the NFFP Home Office dreams up........
 

Pete Appleton

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Administrator
Security

Stuart
I have been thinking about much the same problem. Basically given enough time the toe rags can get past any lock that you care to use. I am currently experimenting with a pager system that you can buy from e-bay for £35. This I am fitting inside my topbox with a seperate tilt switch and rechargeable battery. This works at up to 1/2 a mile and will alert you if someone moves the bike from the side stand or tries to break your lock.
This is not a 'ready to go out of the box' solution but if you have, or know someone with, a bit of electrical knowledge it may be worth a look.
Pete

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/TOAD-PAGER-SY...hZ017QQcategoryZ75329QQtcZphotoQQcmdZViewItem
 

BlackLightning998

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
This shackle lock has a built in short range pager...

Hi Pete,

I've been looking at this shackle lock which has a built in pager which works across 500 yards.

http://www.elitesecuritysupplies.com/motorcycle_secuirty_disc_locks_padlocks_u_locks.html

The supplier is someone I used for my 1.5m squire locks - very reasonable price and good service, I would recommend him.

I'm not sure if the shackle is big enough to be able to securely wrap around the Vincent though, there are no dimensions so I am waiting to hear from him.

I don't have a top box on the bike, but follow the logic. Let me know how you get on.

Cheers

Stuart



Stuart
I have been thinking about much the same problem. Basically given enough time the toe rags can get past any lock that you care to use. I am currently experimenting with a pager system that you can buy from e-bay for £35. This I am fitting inside my topbox with a seperate tilt switch and rechargeable battery. This works at up to 1/2 a mile and will alert you if someone moves the bike from the side stand or tries to break your lock.
This is not a 'ready to go out of the box' solution but if you have, or know someone with, a bit of electrical knowledge it may be worth a look.
Pete

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/TOAD-PAGER-SY...hZ017QQcategoryZ75329QQtcZphotoQQcmdZViewItem
 

Tom Gaynor

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Alarms

Something I considered (until I saw the price) is based on mobile 'phone technology. When your mobile is switched on your position can be triangulated to within a few metres by the signals from the nearest masts. Readers of news reports on Middle East conflicts may spot a connection - or people who have left their mobiles charging next to a radio. There's a distinctive beep-dabeepbeep dabeepbeepbeep (I made that up: you'll recognise it) audio signal that comes through on the radio. That's the mobile phone telling Vodafone where it is. There is a security system for vehicles based on the same principles but for benign purposes. My son used to sell them. At that time they cost around £400 pa, but the price may have risen or fallen since then.
They are akin to the private fleet vehicle management system that allow managers of fleets to know where everyone in the fleet is moment to moment within a few tens of yards based on the (I think) sinister blue roadside CCTV cameras. Those use number plate recognition technology. But there are obvious advantages to a bleeper that tells YOU where your bike is, without alerting the putative new owner.
Technically, concealing a mobile 'phone on your bike would allow Vodaphone (or whoever) to track it until the battery went flat. They might not however be prepared to part with the information unless paid.
I think the point that any lock can be bust by a determined thief is a sound one, and Ride magazine always seem to point out that the prime purpose of a lock is to persuade thieves to go steal someone else's bike rather than risk being nicked while spending 10 minutes nicking yours.
A decent lock backed up by a tracking system would seem a perfect solution.
 

Vic Youel

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member

Pete Appleton

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Administrator
Mobile phones

There are pager systems about that send a text message to your moblie phone if disturbed. This could be useful even if your bike were in your garage and you were at work etc. I decided not to use one of these as many of the rally sites that we visit around the country are out of mobile phone coverage. Especially in Toms part of the world.

The pager, shackle lock looks worth a try. Pity I didn't see it before trying to invent something similar.

Pete
 

Tom Gaynor

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Insecurity measures

A perennial favourite of Scotish tabloids is "taxpayers money" being wasted by frivolous mobile 'phone calls from "ill-equipped" hillwalkers with minor problems. Evidently you would be as puzzled as anyone else who has tried to use a mobile phone in the remoter reaches of the highlands how they manage to make the call.... Is this a rare example of "A Rural Myth"?

There are pager systems about that send a text message to your moblie phone if disturbed. This could be useful even if your bike were in your garage and you were at work etc. I decided not to use one of these as many of the rally sites that we visit around the country are out of mobile phone coverage. Especially in Toms part of the world.

The pager, shackle lock looks worth a try. Pity I didn't see it before trying to invent something similar.

Pete
 

John Appleton

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Hi Pete,

I've been looking at this shackle lock which has a built in pager which works across 500 yards.

http://www.elitesecuritysupplies.com/motorcycle_secuirty_disc_locks_padlocks_u_locks.html

I'm not sure if the shackle is big enough to be able to securely wrap around the Vincent though, there are no dimensions so I am waiting to hear from him.


Cheers

Stuart

I have just bought one of these shackles and am very pleased with it . Its a sturdy piece of equipment in its own right , and with the pager and strident alarm presents quite a formidable deterant . It has the added advantage that it lets you know if your bike has been knocked over before the culprit escapes. As to dimensions , the hoop of the shackle fits easily around either front or rear tyre and rim , and the lock /alarm assembly which closes the hoop is approximately 7inches by 2 inches by 2 1/2 inches .
My only reservation is that the instructions say "dont use under raining". I shall put a cover over it and report back after the winter welsh as I am sure Tracy will organise a suitable environment to thouroughly test its water proofing !

John
 

BlackLightning998

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Is it big enough to.......

Hi John,

That sounds like good news - I think I may follow suit.

It it big enough to lock a piece of the bike, girdraulic fork blade, section of RFM tubing, to someting solid and immoveable such as a lampost when you are out and about or special bike ground anchor?

Stuart
 

John Appleton

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Hi John,

That sounds like good news - I think I may follow suit.

It it big enough to lock a piece of the bike, girdraulic fork blade, section of RFM tubing, to someting solid and immoveable such as a lampost when you are out and about or special bike ground anchor?

Stuart
Hi Stuart , the distance between the arms of the hoop is 5 inches , the distance between the curved section of the hoop and the straight bar of the lock / alarm assembly is 6 inches , so you would have to find a strange shaped lamp post to do as you suggest . A special ground anchor is a practical proposition however .
John
 

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