• Welcome to the website of the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club.

    Should you have any questions relating to the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club, or Vincent H.R.D. motorcycles in general, please contact Graham Smith, Hon. Editor and Webmaster by calling 07977 001 025 or please CLICK HERE.

    You are unrecognised, and therefore, only have VERY restricted access to the many features of this website.

    If you have previously registered to use this forum, you should log in now. CLICK HERE.

    If you have never registered to use this website before, please CLICK HERE.

E: Engine Rear Chain Fitting Problems and Tips


timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Drag the chain over the final drive sprocket in a clockwise direction, viewed from the timing side of the bike. Then drag it along the floor rearwards until it will hook over lower teeth on the rear wheel sprocket. Then rotate the rear wheel forwards until the chain end is somewhere near the top of the sprocket and then hook up the two ends of the chain with the split link. You might have to continue the rotation until the split link is clear of the brake drum.
 

danno

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
Thanks for the reply.
I’m following the Rider’s Handbook and the chain remains linked when taking wheel off.
No mention of unlinking the chain for wheel replacement but maybe this is necessary.
 

TouringComet

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Administrator
If there is slack in the chain, it can bind up around the gearbox drive sprocket. Make sure the chain run is taut.
 

danno

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
If there is slack in the chain, it can bind up around the gearbox drive sprocket. Make sure the chain run is taut.
Ok thanks.
Must be missing something here. The wheel is fully forward and I hook the chain on to the top of the sprocket.
This is easier than at the bottom as the chain can hang in place.
When I start to rotate the wheel anticlockwise, the chain tightens at the top and stops.
Hooking on the chain from the bottom and rotating clockwise is proving difficult.
 

Nulli Secundus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
Ok thanks.
Must be missing something here. The wheel is fully forward and I hook the chain on to the top of the sprocket.
This is easier than at the bottom as the chain can hang in place.
When I start to rotate the wheel anticlockwise, the chain tightens at the top and stops.
Hooking on the chain from the bottom and rotating clockwise is proving difficult.
If your chain has a connecting link why not make the job easy and use it rather than strain/abuse the chain?
The handbook method is only for instances of wheel removal and fitment without tools. If you persist try getting the chain on before fitting the wheel spindle and brake anchor stays.

Are your sprockets standard size and is the chain length standard? If not that might explain your difficulties.
 

Robert Watson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Or put the chain on when the wheel is almost installed ie, the axle not yet inserted, and roll it forward on the ground to put the chain on than roll it back and install the axle. One needs the experience of changing a rear flat on the wilds of I 5 Near Mt Shasta in N California with a riveted chain, to figure out what needs to be done! At least I found some shade...

IMG_1966.JPG
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Danno, I have never tried to remove a rear wheel without first removing the split link. Truthfully I had not even realised that it was an option, although I can see with Robert's set up it would be necessary. Do yourself a favour and take out the split link.
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Yes, he has already told us he has an electric start. That is why he cannot rotate the final drive sprocket backwards. It has got to be easier to remove the split link than the electric start.
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
Yes, he has already told us he has an electric start. That is why he cannot rotate the final drive sprocket backwards. It has got to be easier to remove the split link than the electric start.
I remove the split link anyway to get the chain out of the way making it easier to maneuver the wheel.
I have an electric start. My sprocket turns backward with the gearbox in neutral.
 

danno

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
I have an electric start. My sprocket turns backward with the gearbox in neutral.
Yes, thought it did. It’s when the bike’s in gear and clutch engaged that reverse freewheel isn’t possible.
Might first try the the idea in post #206 as the chain is unhooked from the sprocket
when the axle is out.
Otherwise I’ll see if I can unlink the chain.
 

danno

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
Or put the chain on when the wheel is almost installed ie, the axle not yet inserted, and roll it forward on the ground to put the chain on than roll it back and install the axle.
This works, thanks.
Helps to support the wheel with a block so the centre is roughly in line with the axle slots.
Holding the wheel up with one hand while feeding in the axle is hard work.

I did find the chain link but have never removed one. Just wondering if a special tool in needed or if you slide the clip off with a screwdriver.
 

Nulli Secundus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
This works, thanks.
Helps to support the wheel with a block so the centre is roughly in line with the axle slots.
Holding the wheel up with one hand while feeding in the axle is hard work.

I did find the chain link but have never removed one. Just wondering if a special tool in needed or if you slide the clip off with a screwdriver.
You can buy special pliers to remove and refit the clip, but you might have success with ordinary pliers. You squeeze the tips of the open end towards the first pin (which you use to squeeze against). Similar method to get back on but squeeze against the closed end. Make sure the closed end is pointing in the direction of travel and the open end trailing.

Did nobody see my previous answer on fitting the chain because two others have since said the same thing?
 

danno

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
You can buy special pliers to remove and refit the clip, but you might have success with ordinary pliers. You squeeze the tips of the open end towards the first pin (which you use to squeeze against). Similar method to get back on but squeeze against the closed end. Make sure the closed end is pointing in the direction of travel and the open end trailing.

Did nobody see my previous answer on fitting the chain because two others have since said the same thing?
Thanks. Yes sorry, did see your post #205 about ‘getting the chain on before fitting the wheel spindle’.
 

Gary Gittleson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have always used ordinary pliers to remove the link. I didn't know there's a special kind. The pliers slip off a couple of times before you get the hang of it.

I do have one of these (link below) for aligning the ends of the chain. I pull the ends together and test the position with the master link installed from the outside. Once it slips in easily, I put it in from the behind and install the clip. I snap the clip in with pliers behind the rounded end of the clip and the nearest pin.

https://www.amazon.com/OTC-4758-Stinger-Tension-Motorcycle/dp/B005J3L5B6/ref=sr_1_29?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIouzoubSC5AIVhZyzCh3gnw6xEAMYASAAEgK7k_D_BwE&hvadid=356322098558&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9003578&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1o1&hvqmt=e&hvrand=3921806036873531324&hvtargid=kwd-784640836793&hydadcr=2897_9916381&keywords=motorcycle+chain+installation+tool&qid=1565787372&s=gateway&sr=8-29

Gary
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Ron Kemp had a 2BA screw through the tail of the chain guard sticking up about 3/4" he used to hook the end of the chain over it while taking wheel out. on the long distance trials Comet he painted the chain link white (It goes all night)
 

peter holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The back edge of wide blade screwdriver held onto the open ends of the clip, with light pressure applied the clip pops back the required amount to lift off the two chain posts, reverse to install, no pliers required.
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
This has come a long way from charging but in the context of rear wheel and chain removal it is probably worth telling a story from over fifty years ago. Down in the Kent and Sussex section we had a member by the name of Andy Kernahan. I believe that he is still member. He claimed that he could remove his rear wheel in less than a minute from scratch. Several of us present doubted this so out to his garage we went. Nothing was set up beforehand and the bike was leaning up against the wall of his garage. It took him a while to get the bike onto its rear stand, quite a while to find the split link and either pliers or a screw driver to, remove the link. The torque stays were loosened, the brakes rotated and the trunions removed from the brake arms and finally the tommy bar spindle undone and the wheel removed. It took about ten seconds over the one minute target. It is going to take danno and some other newer members some time before they realise just how clever a lot of Vincent design is and how quickly and easily some jobs can be done.
 

TouringComet

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Administrator
With newer chains, I find the side plate of the split link is very hard to take on/off, it seems to be a slight interference fit on the pins. I use the method described by Robert, leave the chain intact, and roll the wheel as far forward as possible, the chain can then be placed around the wheel sprocket. Then fit the brake arms and tommy bar.
 

Top