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OP: Oil Pump Quill

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The engine has been making a different whining sound than usual, so I took the timing cover off to inspect. The quill became a two-piece item! Should I look for a certified JB Welder to stick it back together? :eek: A new one is 24 quid!

Quill.jpg
 

Viny4

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Use a lipped bearing if you must. To me, using a roller for thrust is a poor design. Brough S. used it for end float. BSA twins change from a ball to roller for end foot. I use a ball. Vincent has it right and it is better when lapping to size. Its like putting a roller in the middle of the clutch push rod instead of a ball (carbide).
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Oh well, Looks like I am wrong again,
I prefer a roller, My rollers have been no trouble for many years,
But a Ball in the clutch I have seen wears into the rod,
Maybe the rod was not hard enough ?,
I have also seen many clutch arms where the rod has bored in the arm,
But with a few rollers, Between the rods, No problem.
Cheers Bill.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Its a good job that quill did break otherwise for the first time in my (considerable) forum examination there would be no technical questions on the forum.
Even that detailed (one might say myopic o_O ) examination of a twin rebuild has sunk out of sight...
Oh dear...
 

oexing

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Viny4 , I was referring to lipped roller bearings for crankshaft mains - and there is NO thrust to speak of in Vincent engines. So not the least problem to use rollers in this place. I do like them for ease of assembling when having rollers plus cages- plastic PA66 gf certainly - contained in outer races. I have them in the gearbox as well, one ball bearing behind the clutch of course due to side loads there. What the British once called Superblends in Commandos is standard today in SKF or FAG roller types, called logarythmic profile, which is basically rollers polished down at their ends for less edge loads on "flexible" shafts.
In clutch push rods I´d have balls in between sections of tool steel for less friction when pulling the clutch. But you have to have hardened pushrods acting on balls so get some simple throughhardening steel rod and heat to medium red and quench in water, get a big torch for quick heat so you can keep hardness to 1-2 mm .

Vic
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Vic, My lipped bearings are just like standard ones , Only with a lip !,
The lip will only come into play if the outer ring tries to walk inwards,
So I don't think there is any real thrust ?,
I did try to have the mains holes reclaimed by an Expert, But It was a balls up.
Cheers Bill.
 

oexing

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
So my guess you got imperial roller bearings with one lip on outer race and rollers plus cage contained on inner race ? I wonder why they did not have your type for standard , would have saved a lot of troubles for many drivers for decades.
When I made up my mind about new cranks and repairing mangled engine cases I looked into imperial roller bearings but was unable to find the types I had in mind - and often unsure about what I´d posssibly get with confusing markings on races . So I came up with all metric - which is no bad idea with 62mm o.d. races so you don´t need to bore out the 63,5mm imperial for sleeving, just lick up the old bore and sleeve for 62mm , no weakening the seat. I did new cranks from billet with 30 mm mainshaft and in case of standard crank with 1 " dia. you could easily sleeve it for 30 mm - yeahh - metric . . . .

Vic
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Our "A" chap put it MPH years ago,
My having raced for many years, Was not good for the poor old Vincent
I think I took my Twin to 6750 rev's once,
Now I don't like going past 4000 !,
Getting OLD !, Like my Bike !.
Cheers Bill.
 

Monkeypants

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Viny4 , I was referring to lipped roller bearings for crankshaft mains - and there is NO thrust to speak of in Vincent engines. So not the least problem to use rollers in this place. I do like them for ease of assembling when having rollers plus cages- plastic PA66 gf certainly - contained in outer races. I have them in the gearbox as well, one ball bearing behind the clutch of course due to side loads there. What the British once called Superblends in Commandos is standard today in SKF or FAG roller types, called logarythmic profile, which is basically rollers polished down at their ends for less edge loads on "flexible" shafts.
In clutch push rods I´d have balls in between sections of tool steel for less friction when pulling the clutch. But you have to have hardened pushrods acting on balls so get some simple throughhardening steel rod and heat to medium red and quench in water, get a big torch for quick heat so you can keep hardness to 1-2 mm .

Vic
Jim Comstock busy busting myths again. Logarithmic Superblends this time

[video]
 
Last edited by a moderator:

oexing

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Did they expect to find barrel shaped rollers like in my photo on the right ? This is in fact a rear main bearing of BMW Earles fork sports engines, the left type is the superblend roller type as is standard on top end brand roller bearings since decades. By the way, I am not impressed by the measuring setup in the video, excessive length of stem on the Sony encoder - a cheap one at that. So the real shape of roller ends may be a bit different.

Vic
P1080410.JPG
 

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