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Post war cylinder head casting?

clevtrev

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member

Interesting find for someone? I imagine a lot of time and effort has gone into making it.
That is a mold to produce a wax item for investment casting. I only know of one made in New Zealand about 30 years ago, saw a wax head, oourtesy of the Late Ian McCully.
 

Herman-Handlebars

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
That is a mold to produce a wax item for investment casting. I only know of one made in New Zealand about 30 years ago, saw a wax head, oourtesy of the Late Ian McCully.
That's interesting, so maybe someone thought investment casting a head may get better results than the original sand casting with cores?
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
This head mold looks like it has never seen wax. Also, I did not see many vent holes, which threw me off. The lack of sprues and vents makes sense because the foundry would glue them on as the wax is prepared for spraying.

When I made F106s for the BAR gearbox I used the lost wax method.

100_2532.jpg

The plug is a modified original.

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Much like the head above you minimize the extra space around the plug so the material can be kept to a minimum. Clay is layed around the part to the half-way point of the part. The whole thing is sprayed with mold release. I pour the silicone rubber in once the clay floor is constructed. This becomes the bottom.

100_2584.jpg

Before the pour, I placed a lot of acorn nuts on the clay floor for indexing. I have flipped this over and pulled out the clay floor and acorn nuts. I also pulled out all the clay that was stuffed in the void in the bottom of the F106. I then built a fence of clay so I could pour a separate removable part to keep the void in the F106.

100_2586.jpg

I used more acorn nuts in there to index the part.

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The three-part mold ready to use.

Vent (2).JPG

I pour wax in the mold through the timing side leg which can be machined when there is an aluminum part. I pour it with the mold vertical and you can see the vent hole in the split on the left side.

De Molding 01.PNG

The mold is taking on the color of the wax. The release agent on the left, Poli-Ease 2300.

IMG_2452.JPG

The raw casting.

David
 

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