Paul d'Orleans and Vintagent Las Vegas auction comment

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Oldhaven

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My guess is that the Toonerville Trolley would have gotten a good price and maybe more for the seller if advertised thru the club or a less highfalutin' venue. This machine has a lot of history and nostalgic value for some of us. It seems quite a bargain, and shows what the misplaced value of mismatched numbers or the wrong color mean as opposed to a caringly prepared and loved Vincent for the road. Anyone know where it went?

Ron
 

Albervin

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He actually wrote
With over 11,000 postwar Vincents produced, the very top prices are clearly collector-driven, and not about rarity per se...
I guess that would be close to the mark.
 

TouringGodet

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Read the comments, he has now updated the text. It used to say 13,000 post war twins. I posted the anonymous comment pointing out the error.
 

Gene Nehring

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I like Paul and I know him through social media.

I did not really enjoy that particular article, I thought he was out to lunch about buying bikes at Auctions. I also think the buyer premiums and seller fees of Companies like Bonhams is outrageous.

I find Paul's articles are slanted towards the Companies he works for. I don't really appreciate reading articles that are just adverts for Auction houses.
 

Magnetoman

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he has now updated the text. It used to say 13,000 post war twins. I posted the anonymous comment pointing out the error.
Two comments come to mind, one written in a book 20 years ago:

"Reporters are faced with the daily choice of painstakingly researching stories or writing whatever people tell them. Both approaches pay the same." Scott Adams, 'The Dilbert Principle (Harper, 1996)

Adams's comment can be restated as Research? We don't need no stinkin' research!

Maybe unrelated to this but worth mentioning anyway is one widely known magazine writer whose every article can be summarized as "The best motorcycle I've ever ridden in my entire life!!" I have to assume manufacturers simultaneously love him and hold him in contempt. The principle that applies here is Facts? We don't need no stinkin' facts!
 

vibrac

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I had the occasion to read an article in a recent magazine (american) about someone I know very well and his business, only half the facts were true and the few about me were all wrong.
I am sure that many of you get the same feedback when 'facts' about motorcycles or a subject you know well are mentioned in the general media
Is it a case of case of "Send reinforcements we are going to advance" in WW2 turning into "Send three and forpence we are going to a dance" or just Hype again?
 

Magnetoman

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an article in a recent magazine (american) about someone I know very well and his business, only half the facts were true and the few about me were all wrong.
A recent magazine (British) had an article that copied extensively, without attribution, from an article I had written some years ago about a rare motorcycle for a club magazine. Even though the author clearly had my article in front of him as he typed, in adding and rearranging a few words here and there to avoid word-for-word plagiarism he managed to make what he copied wrong. Plagiarism is bad, but incorrect plagiarism is inexcusable! I was sufficiently annoyed that I wrote to the editor and a few months later a brief apology was printed.

Another (American) magazine occasionally publishes an article about old Harley-Davidsons by the author of several books on the subject. I don't claim to know as much about H-Ds as about HRDs, but even I recognize so many errors in the articles (and books) that it's laughable.

I suppose all of the above is bascially OK if one remembers magazine articles are light entertainment and only "factual" in the sense that a movie like ' Inglourious Basterds' is an historical documentary about WWII.
 

ClassicBiker

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an article in a recent magazine (american) about someone I know very well and his business, only half the facts were true and the few about me were all wrong.
Another (American) magazine occasionally publishes an article about old Harley-Davidsons by the author of several books on the subject. I don't claim to know as much about H-Ds as about HRDs, but even I recognize so many errors in the articles (and books) that it's laughable.

****Warning "Small Moan" Warning******
I don't about anyone else but when I come across "facts" that are wrong, whether they are dates, dates that don't work out, numbers that don't add up, etc., I have difficulty in finishing the article or book. The credibility of the author has been compromised in my mind. If the author has got the easy stuff wrong, and I can spot it, what more significant "fact" is wrong? It just takes the joy right out of it.
*****This has been "Small Moan"******
Steven
 
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