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Old and out of touch.

Williegunn

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
I have recently acquired a 1954 Vincent Comet it needs a bit (lot) of restoration and this is in hand.
I would like to keep this bike it has some sentimental attachment. I do not have a bike licence, just cars buses and lorries. In my youth you past a test on a < 250cc bike then youcould drive anything. Looking at the DLVC site things have changed. A1, A2, Full A, Category A, the list seems endless.
Does this apply to me?
A2 motorcycle licence: At age 19 or over, you take a test on a motorcycle without sidecar of at least 395 cc with a power output of at least 25 kW but not exceeding 35 kW. If you pass, you may ride any motorcycle not exceeding 35 kW and with a power to weight ratio not exceeding 0.2 kW/kg.
Pass the age requirement easily!
Do I need to buy a small bike to learn on?
 

b'knighted

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I think you'll need to go to a "riding school" to pass the test on something bigger. I don't think that the standard Comet at 28bhp will meet the requirement. 25 KW is listed as 33 BHP.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Yes dont buy a bike a good riding school will take you to the necessary level and its fun (so im told, when I got my first bike I could have ridden a Black Shadow on L plates)
NB who would guess that a comet is so puney by todays standards you cant pass a test on it
 

Williegunn

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Thanks, I thought about going down the school route but was worried about the new bikes having the brake and the gear change on the wrong side. But having said that looking at some of the stables you guys have you must be able to change backwards and forwards. Will it be a problem?

M
 

Howard

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Thanks, I thought about going down the school route but was worried about the new bikes having the brake and the gear change on the wrong side. But having said that looking at some of the stables you guys have you must be able to change backwards and forwards. Will it be a problem?

M

It does add to the excitement, putting the brake on instead of changing gear, but generally going from 1 up 3 down on the right, to 1 down 5 up on the left doesn't cause as many problems as you'd think. :)

H
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
One days exposure to different layouts makes no difference to me (and I am a guy who is always looking for his keys)
I have left ,right, up for up and down for down, foot brake behind footrest,brake in front of footrest, no clutch or with clutch, throttle twist grip and throttle lever, gearchange on foot, on handle bar, on tank and never any problems.
Ride the same bike every day on a trip ah then it is a different matter -takes a couple of days for 'imprinting' to fade
 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Thanks, I thought about going down the school route but was worried about the new bikes having the brake and the gear change on the wrong side. But having said that looking at some of the stables you guys have you must be able to change backwards and forwards. Will it be a problem?

M

Nope. Modern Triumph, to '60's Triumph and Moto Guzzi, to Shadow to Comet. You will know which bike you're on and where everything is and how it operates. You might make an occassional faux pas but they won't be drastic or catashropic. Don't worry about it. Get out there and ride.
Steven
 

Williegunn

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Well a bit more research, and "If you’re happy with a smaller bike or if you’re under 21, you should take the A2 test on a 125cc bike, and gain your 'full restricted' licence, in which you are restricted to motorcycles with a power output of 33 BHP for 2 years, after which you can ride any size of machine." So it looks as if a Comet comes under the smaller bike rule! I assume all you 1000cc boys will nod sagely and say I told you so!
 

nkt267

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
My Son rode my old B33 for a long while after he passed his test because of the 33bhp rule..John
 
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