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Oh dear! I'm sorry I found this photo online...........


vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
No body will ever beat the late Malcolm Elgers Norton Dominator framed Comet the Comdon
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Not my feeling. My Norvin has justified its existence itself in taking me all over Europe and back home on its own wheels so far.
It's just that the "two good bikes butchered" cliché is used too often. I can't imagine anyone breaking two complete machines to build a special, it's the other way round, Norvins are sometimes a collection of parts assembled to put another machine on the road. Let see what I will end up with this collection of parts that were on my shelves for years.View attachment 26456
At least your project has a British theme to it. Other than a Commando gearbox, my poor Comet engine is surrounded by parts from BMW,Yamaha, Suzuki,Honda, and Ducati. No idea what to call it.... desperately need some vowels.
 

Sakura

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
At least your project has a British theme to it. Other than a Commando gearbox, my poor Comet engine is surrounded by parts from BMW,Yamaha, Suzuki,Honda, and Ducati. No idea what to call it.... desperately need some vowels.
How about Chimera? Greek fire breathing monster made up of many parts.
 

Glenliman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I recognize that machine.
It's a NotrunVinBin.
These bikes are very well respected in racing circles.
They are known for their ability to squirt hot oil on competitors as they attempt to make that knee scraping inside pass.
Glen
 

Roslyn

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I think the biggest problem will be what to call it - a Vibsa?
My Brother has one and yes it is called Vibsa a Comet engine in a Bsa A10 and a bit tatty but goes well for a sincle 500cc lump and I have plans for my sad looking Shadow and thinking Yellow ios nice colour.
 

Glenliman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have a fellow who accosts me yearly at the swap meet to inform me that I have " ruined my Rapide" by converting it into a lightweight monoshocker with modern suspension and brakes.
The first year it had the borrowed Rapide engine in place and ever since it has had the all new 1360.
The Rapide engine is back in its non matching Vincent rolling chassis parts.
Every year I explain this and every year he chastises me for " destroying a Vincent" by improving its acceleration, braking, handling and suspension.
Finally last year I gave up on explaining that the bike is all new. He seems to have decided that there is evil in the world and this is how it manifests itself.
It takes perfectly good old Vincents and turns them into something lightweight and quick with modern handling etc. This is a very bad thing!
In frustration, I told him that the old bike caught fire and all that remained was the engine, so I cobbled something together to make use of it.
He seemed satisfied with that.
He's going to get really messed up when I show up on the old Rapide this year!

Glen
 
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Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have a fellow who accosts me yearly at the swap meet to inform me that I have " ruined my Rapide" by converting it into a lightweight monoshocker with modern suspension and brakes.
The first year it had the borrowed Rapide engine in place and ever since it has had the all new 1360.
The Rapide engine is back in its non matching Vincent rolling chassis parts.
Every year I explain this and every year he chastises me for " destroying a Vincent" by improving its acceleration, braking, handling and suspension.
Finally last year I gave up on explaining that the bike is all new. He seems to have decided that there is evil in the world and this is how it manifests itself.
It takes perfectly good old Vincents and turns them into something lightweight and quick with modern handling etc. This is a very bad thing!
In frustration, I told him that the old bike caught fire and all that remained was the engine, so I cobbled something together to make use of it.
He seemed satisfied with that.
He's going to get really messed up when I show up on the old Rapide this year!

Glen
It's not very good odds that I will have the Mongrel Comet ready in time, but certainly will for next year. If he gets upset with your bike, then no doubt mine with all it's Japanese bits will liquify everything in his bowels.
 

Sakura

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
It's not very good odds that I will have the Mongrel Comet ready in time, but certainly will for next year. If he gets upset with your bike, then no doubt mine with all it's Japanese bits will liquify everything in his bowels.
Just tell them a short two word phrase regarding sex and travel. Works for me, you didn't want them as a friend anyway, did you?
 

macvette

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Just tell them a short two word phrase regarding sex and travel. Works for me, you didn't want them as a friend anyway, did you?
I have quiet snigger when "experts" look at my open D and ask why I modified the rear suspension.
 

Little Honda

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Not my feeling. My Norvin has justified its existence itself in taking me all over Europe and back home on its own wheels so far.
It's just that the "two good bikes butchered" cliché is used too often. I can't imagine anyone breaking two complete machines to build a special, it's the other way round, Norvins are sometimes a collection of parts assembled to put another machine on the road. Let see what I will end up with this collection of parts that were on my shelves for years.View attachment 26456
I am absolutely with you, Eric, most of the moaners have never ridden a GOOD (!!) Norvin. There are
big differences of getting a Vincent engine in a featherbed frame - and it should be a featherbed,
not any other Norton frame! Do I see correctly on yr pic: Have you cut the front down tubes?
Well, I think, that spoils the featherbed! Admittedly, it has been a trend in the sixties, to put your
feet on rests which were 8 inches in front of the rear axle and have clip-ons fitted half way between
upper and lower fork bridges. Ask one of these "engineers", to sit and ride on their specials today,
in their seventies! No, first condition, when building a Norvin, you must maintain the riding position
as intended by the Norton factory! Then, only then, you will experience a "featherbed ride", which
is comfortable and effortless, condition to be fast. And, believe me, you don´t have to cut anything
from a Vincent engine - twin or single alike - to put it nicely into a featherbed.
I have build my Norvin after 30 years on original Vincents and am absolutely convinced, it´s a big
improvement to the standard Vincent. And I haven´t met anybody, until now, who was not fascinated
by its good looks, especially those, who know nothing about Vincents, at all.
And finally, what moaners use to forget: What would they do in the early sixties, when they damaged their
Vincent in an accident? Norton framework was far cheaper than Vincent spares. And all those, who could
not afford a complete Vincent, might have solved their financial problem by some nice engineering, using
a featherbed, lying around somewhere?
 

Attachments

peter holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The criticism normally proffered against a Norvin is the higher centre of gravity with regard to the position of the engine, I have never built or ridden a Norvin so it would unwise to state an opinion, but purely out of interest, how much higher does the engine sit in comparison to a Standard B + C, I know there is no such thing as standard, but if we assume 20-19 inch wheels with normal springs and shocks.
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have never had the pleasure of riding a Norvin either, but personally I wouldn't worry too much about engine height. When I was coaxing the Comet engine into a bastardized Honda frame, my desire to utilize an existing engine mount made for an engine sitting higher that I would have preferred. However.... if anyone tells me it will have an adverse effect on handling, I can always say "Then explain this".

IMG_0071.JPG
 
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Sakura

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The criticism normally proffered against a Norvin is the higher centre of gravity with regard to the position of the engine, I have never built or ridden a Norvin so it would unwise to state an opinion, but purely out of interest, how much higher does the engine sit in comparison to a Standard B + C, I know there is no such thing as standard, but if we assume 20-19 inch wheels with normal springs and shocks.
Most such criticism is proffered by armchair "engineers" who have never ever tried to build anything non standard but seem to have a wealth of knowledge on such matters.
 

Little Honda

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Very nice pictures, indeed! What we can all see, is, that the Norvin´s centre of gravity is more similar to the
actual historic development, visible in this hot Ducati. It seems to be more important for the rideability of
a bike, to concentrate masses as tight in the centre, as possible, not, as low as possible. (1)
But with reference to the Norvin, shown above, I see a very long kickstart lever, made from a HONDA CB750.
When I built mine, I had a kickstartshaft with Hondasplines welded together and had a lever, as long, as on
the pic above. Result: I broke the shaft! (somewhere, I still have pics of it) If you look on my Norvin, you can
see a lever, app. 2in shorter than above, which is sufficient, as I disliked to touch the kickstart peg
with my right knee when riding with such a long lever. Furthermore, you do not need this multi-joint gear
linkage, as shown in the pic above. Just look at my Norvin. It has the normal Vincent gear lever, shortened
by 1 1/2", due to normal feet. I also have a standard straight Vincent handlebar fitted, no clip-ons.
If you cannot ride a Ducati anymore, without feeling uncomfortable after 30minutes, you should be honest
to yourself and ride a bike which suits your usage profile.
(1) remember physics lessons: holding a rotating bicycle wheel in your hands and try to move sideways:
as masses are far from centre of wheel, it is very difficult to turn. Same with centre of gravity and
engine, low or high, no difference.
 

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