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Misc: Everything Else Norvin Rebuild



Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#41
Now I'm feeling remorseful about my Comet project. Assembled from Vincent, Norton, Ducati, BMW, Yamaha, 2 different Hondas and still counting.... and it has disc brakes. I need to add some vowels so I can come up with an appropriate X rated acronym.
 

davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#43
Regarding footrests. The bike had some rather poor quality rear sets fitted which aren't really worth re-using. I would like to try and use original Vincent footrests/pedals.

Has anyone got any complete footrests or even bits and pieces that they'd consider selling ?
Tarozzi makes a decent rearset if you get stuck for a solution. They are metric, but you can get them with many different features. Check the "Universal" rearsets.

http://www.fastfromthepast.com/rearsets

David
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#44
I fitted a Robinson 4 leading shoe to my first Egli I got from Roger Slater from his caravan in a wood at Chadersley Corbett .when I started racing it in BMsee MCC and VOC meetings. cant remember where I bought it but it was brand new and a lot of money in 1960 odd
It was without doubt the worst collection of poor castings and rubbish components I ever owned, it finally dumped me in the gravel at Norwich hairpin at Snetterton on lap two with the lever against the twist grip. In the end I gave it to Ron Kemp he tried to sort it but never did. I fitted a 190mm BSA brake which I had used on the comet racer that was much better. All that glitters is not gold
 

greg brillus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#45
I agree that some replica brakes are extremely poor, even some of our replica Lightning alloy plates have been far from satisfactory from what I've seen. I had a replica full width front hub where the new linings came away from the shoe with a light pry with a blade screwdriver because of a terrible ridge left in the center-line of the brake shoes themselves as the manufacturer could not be bothered dressing it off. I have to say that some of the replica brakes are far better than others, and it is worth noting that when considering buying one, that you buy one that ideally suits the size and weight of the bike. Not only that but some of the large top quality brakes are very expensive, between 2000 to 2500 pounds. I have had great success with an original but very much lightened Suzuki 750 GT brake, Three of the magnesium back plate 230 mm Ceriani's and I also have one of the Molnar replica Magnesium 250 mm Fontana's, this last one is probably the pick of the bunch and I haven't decided what will happen to it yet, but is sure is an awesome looking brake.......... Just fabulous.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#46
just a note Greg my Robinson was an original it may be that not for the first time Replicas are better than the original as we all saw a decade ago when the Club build Shadow, the first made entirely out of new parts for sixty odd years did not sell well, the market does not always agree.. more fool the market
 

Rixon

Website User
VOC Member
#47
The replica brakes I've shortlisted are from Laszlo at Café Racer Suspension in Hungary. As far as I can understand his Robinson and Ceriani replicas share the same internals. I've seen several reviews of his products and all have been positive.
 

oexing

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#48
When going for an all magnesium brake like the Fontanas, better get double crossed spokes. It is very important that spokes join the magnesium hub in perfect tangential orientation so the material is compression stressed , unlike the more radial way as with single crossed spokes. The cracked Fontana hub with single crossed pattern was possibly scrapped in an accident, but even so , you better order spoke lengths for double crossed pattern, a bit more weight but worth the added safety.

Vic
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P1060447.JPG

P1060450.JPG

P1060454.JPG
 

oexing

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#52
Chris, did you try that before ? I imagine there is a lot of tension on that ring from the spokes. So I guess that ring had to be very massive. I was thinking about special welding but magnesium is a bit problematic and it would not be done at acceptable price most likely. Instead I´d go for just a new hub, still in production from Molnar and other sources. Actually I don´t need to repair that pictured hub, got a perfect one from a friend, the golden painted in the photo. But then there is no active project to include the Fontana for a while, may go onto a 750 Laverda. In my eyes a Fontana is great for Eglis but not quite in the spirit of more standard Rapides or Shadows so I will keep the twin drum set albeit my own design I think.

Vic
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#53
In among the drivel one reads in bike papers was a nugget of interest about the new Brough Superior SS100.
Yes I know what's the market for a £60K bike with a nod to a 1930 design? (and this from a country with a 50mph limit on single carriageways)
Anyway tucked away in the specs was the front brake which is a 4 (yes 4) X230mm dia discs front on a cotton reel hub arranged on each end with 4 pot calipers, braking distances are not quoted on road tests nowadays, but the hack said they were "stupendously powerful " lets see 230mm is about 9 inches in real money OK I could live with 180 to keep the profile near the original 7" drum it said they were based on Aircraft brakes, not for use on Bramptons though methinks
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
#54
In among the drivel one reads in bike papers was a nugget of interest about the new Brough Superior SS100.
Yes I know what's the market for a £60K bike with a nod to a 1930 design? (and this from a country with a 50mph limit on single carriageways)
Anyway tucked away in the specs was the front brake which is a 4 (yes 4) X230mm dia discs front on a cotton reel hub arranged on each end with 4 pot calipers, braking distances are not quoted on road tests nowadays, but the hack said they were "stupendously powerful " lets see 230mm is about 9 inches in real money OK I could live with 180 to keep the profile near the original 7" drum it said they were based on Aircraft brakes, not for use on Bramptons though methinks
I looked closely at these a few years ago when the new Brough Superior appeared at the motorcycle show and researched on the internet to see how they worked. I can see that it is a way to increase the braking area without increasing the diameter but other than that I saw it as an unnecessary complication and a bit of a gimmick. There are lots of incredibly good brakes available without the extra complication used here.
Note: The speed limit on single carriageways in the UK is 60 mph unless otherwise posted not 50 mph as posted above.
I'm not much of one for originality. A Norvin is a special and what made specials special was the diverse components that they were made up of. The more diverse the more special they were.
 
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chrislaun

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#55
Apparently early Oldani's were prone to breaking the spoke flange and they later changed to a steel spoke flange, I've seen several. there's not that much tension on spokes and they operate in opposing directions, look how thin a standard Vincent spoke flange is. I have a Fontana with a couple of spokes broken out and intend to re-flange it.
Chris.
 

Spqreddie

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#56
This is the magnesium 250 Fontana replica, on wich i am working to for adapting it to my Rapide. The rim is a flanged alloy type WM2, and the Tyre a Speedmaster MKII, I have been told by an Avon engineer that the Speedmaster was actually disinged for a WM2 rim witdht. It's a bit larger then than the original rim, but i hope this will give slightly more tyre contact for the bigger brake. I am still thinking on where to fix the torque bar. i dont want to drill the balades, so i must make a clamp or have a rally long torque arm up to the fork links spindles. received_10160529813760581.jpeg received_10160529811460581.jpeg
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#57
I

Note: The speed limit on single carriageways in the UK is 60 mph unless otherwise posted not 50 mph as posted above.
.
According to the rag I read the SS100 is made in France and I know this year from the waves of boredom on the single carriageway to Dunkirk 80kph is a good as it gets. Any side road or farm track intersection and its less. Not a problem next year, I have no wish to join a queue for an international driving license to sample that pain again.
 

Rixon

Website User
VOC Member
#58
Update. Bought the TZ brake with wheel for what I think is a decent price, around the same as a replica Ceriani. As a bonus I also got a new old stock Goldie silencer in the deal.

The brake looks in decent condition and should turn out well, going to strip it down and have it vapour blasted.

I was intending to use either a Goldie silencer or straight through pipes but I thought they would probably be too noisy for road use. I've seen the push-in baffles but it seems rather contrary to have a straight through exhaust and then put a baffle in the end. Anyone had any experience ?

My only experience is with a classic Jaguar exhaust system where a reducer near the head was ok, but the same reducer near the end of the exhaust dropped the performance.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#59
For me the Armours Stainless Vincent, Is the best for performance, Not too much noise.
The hole inside WAS bigger for the Stainless, But I was there a few months ago and they told me they now
Fit the same size Baffle in the Chrome one.
I had a Goldie one years ago, And it had a very small baffle hole, So have a look inside, What ever you buy.
Cheers Bill.
 

chrislaun

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#60
I have a straight through Goldie on my Norvin, it's a bit louder than my straight through "standard" silencer on my Shadow but not at all anti-social, by straight through I don't mean empty, they have at least a perforated tube inside.
 


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