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F: Frame Norvin out of Dominator 88


Chris Launders

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
If I had a complete engine and wanted something more of a cafe racer I would go more along the lines of the road racing version of Nero. Either using a UFM if I had one or making my own, along with the rear subframe and a swinging arm to suit.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Yes or even just a Vincent Steering Head, You could bolt a "D" type tube to the back of it,
Only problem is the oil tank, Which is why Ron made my Special Petrol Tank , Half Petrol, Half Oil,
Like an "A". Cheers Bill.
 

greg brillus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
From my experience and others at the track, most Featherbed frame bikes that feel a bit slow when turning in on cornering are set up too high at the front. I have lowered the front of mine using about a 30 mm spacer and a longer steering stem up front and longer rear coilover shock absorbers at the rear. It behaves quite well, although there is more I want to do in the near future. Early next year I will be swapping out the Jawa speedway engine for a Comet engine ........ ;).
 

Chris Launders

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I've just remembered I have a home made steering head lug, it came to me attached to a pair of Ariel forks and looks to have been made to put the Ariel forks on a Vincent. it uses the Ariel headstock with the rest fabricated, a very neat job it is too. Would that be any use to you ? I have the Ariel forks along with the bearings which still had new grease on so was probably never used.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
We could all build specials with our own frames Norton replica feather beds or Egli its just engineering. Getting one registered for the road, ah, now that is difficult. I belive step one is not getting a frame or finding the money for an engine its more moving to a country that is less asiduious in control of new built up motorcycles,great crime that it is evidently regarded to be in the UK.
 

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I'm still thinking that the distance between the lower yolk/bottom of the steering head to the tire contact patch sets the front height.
 

Chris Launders

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Ah well, with a longer stem and a spacer above the top bearing the bottom yoke will be further down the legs, so nearer the ground.
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Or think of it this way...Normally you would just slide the tubes up through the clamps. In order to do that with Norton fork tubes (taper at the top) you would need to move the top yoke up, so longer stem and spacer between the top bearing and yoke.

Ps.. if you want to extend one, you could sacrifice another lower yoke. Saves having to turn threads. The alloy stem is my first one so feel the need to show it to everyone on the planet.
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Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Or think of it this way...Normally you would just slide the tubes up through the clamps. In order to do that with Norton fork tubes (taper at the top) you would need to move the top yoke up, so longer stem and spacer between the top bearing and yoke.

Ps.. if you want to extend one, you could sacrifice another lower yoke. Saves having to turn threads. The alloy stem is my first one so feel the need to show it to everyone on the planet.
View attachment 29896View attachment 29897View attachment 29898View attachment 29899
No alloy yokes ?, I bought the early ones from Gus Kuhn's, In the 70s,
And near one clamp it cracked, The later ones are much stronger, The clamp works in a different way.
Cheers Bill.
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
No alloy yokes ?,
Cheers Bill.
I was looking at it through the eyes of a cheap DIY guy, so hence the extended stem. I'd like to take a stab at making my own yoke, but need to avoid any more rabbit holes. Times ticking. Now that you mention the Gus Kuhn ones, I vaguely remember them.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I was looking at it through the eyes of a cheap DIY guy, so hence the extended stem. I'd like to take a stab at making my own yoke, but need to avoid any more rabbit holes. Times ticking. Now that you mention the Gus Kuhn ones, I vaguely remember them.
The old ones had gap / Clamp outside on the tube.
Not good.
Also I think the stem is fixed to the top steel yoke. As standard. But my race one was fitted to the bottom ?.
Cheers Bill.
 

Pushrod Twin

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Look no Tubes !.
Remarkably similar to the one featured in Classic Bike, Aug 1982, but I suspect not the same bike. Interestingly, that issue of CB has a reprint of the 1972 article outlining the build of the Norvin Nemesis.
My Vincent adventure started with the desire to build a Norvin when I fell into the ownership of a Wideline Dominator frame back in the '70's and one could argue that the Vin motor I finally found was the perfect candidate, having had the gearbox chopped off. However, I learned that Dominator frames have a tendency to crack the front tubes at the steering head, mine was just starting, so I chose to go down the Egli route. Considering that Fritz reputedly used "Manx steering geometry" combined with mounting the engine as the designers intended, I believe it is the best of both worlds.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Yes I think this was a bit later, The frame was done by an Italian sounding bloke,
I spoke to Phil on the phone, About 5 years ago, I sold him an 1.1/2"GP carb, He said it was better for him to do up an old carb',
He was not happy with the new ones, Bit like Greg.
He told me of the Norvin he had built and that he sold it to a dealer and if I wanted to see it,
It was on a web site
He told me the Steering was a bit heavy and his wife didn't like it on the back, He is a BSA Man !!
He builds really Big Goldie Engines etc,
Another nice bloke to talk to, Very interesting.

Have you been having some good rides with your Egli ?, Cheers Bill.
 
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Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
However, I learned that Dominator frames have a tendency to crack the front tubes at the steering head, mine was just starting, so I chose to go down the Egli route.
As I understand it, they have a tendency to do that if the head steady is omitted as it braces the steering head. Manx had an adjustable one? Y/N?
 

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