Multiplate Clutch for Rapide

cybershoot

Forum User
Non-VOC Member
Hello - I have replaced the original clutch with the multiplate clutch that is being sold by all well known retailers. Drum got new bushes as well. Now if there is load on the pri sprocket (engine running..) drum and clutch center tend to spin together. Meaning there is momentum applied from main shaft to drum in a way! Any idea what is wrong here? Gearbox shifts perfectly through the gears when engine is not running - if so, gearbox doesn't shift.
 

greg brillus

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VOC Member
Sounds as if you've got no end float in the hub verses the new bushes in the chainwheel, meaning that the total width of the bushes is wider than the center sleeve section of the clutch hub. This should just be proud of the inner bush with the clutch hub passed through. Sounds like you need to disassemble and see what is going on, but this sounds like the problem to me. You should be able to wobble the chainwheel with your hands, if not then something is too tight. Make sure the primary chain is not adjusted too tight as well, as this can cause a similar problem.
 

clevtrev

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VOC Member
Using a Multiplate requires more backlash than the original. I recommend .015" any less means as the engine warms the clutch will lock and you will find it impossible to change gear. By baclash I mean end float of the clutch centre, as pointed out by Greg above.
 

nkt267

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VOC Member
I recently put a new seal into and old chainwheel and the seal was too wide which stopped the bushes seating. just had to take a few thou off the bush..john
 

greg brillus

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VOC Member
The only movement in the clutch center is the play the input shaft bearing, the play is actually in the chain wheel and the outer clutch basket. I'll give you a couple of useful tips........Check and see if the friction plates are a really snug fit in the outer basket, and if they have little or next to no play, I dress off a couple of thou off each ear of every friction plate to give the plate a little back lash. Just two of three passes with a nice flat medium file on one side only, sounds like it would take forever, but it is quicker than you might think. This will help the clutch "Free off " much better, and also, when you assemble the clutch for the final time, just dip each friction plate in ATF or a similar fine weight oil, wipe off the excess and assemble alternating the plates, finishing with the outer pressure plate. You don't need to run the clutch in a bath of oil........This will create extra drag and the clutch will be a right pain. You will need to seal off the clutch cover using the available gaskets and smear of sealant helps. It is wise to annually strip the clutch, and wash the plates clean, and reassemble as above. Others will instruct you to run in a bath of oil, but I have done many this way, and the clutches run fine with way less drag problems. The capacity in the clutch housing area does not allow for much oil anyway, and it gets dirty necessitating a strip and clean every year, which the instructions recommend. Try it and see how well it works for you, cheers.............Greg.
 

hadronuk

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VOC Member
My experience of using a small amount of oil or grease on my V2 clutch with sintered plates is that though it does give a nice progressive clutch take up, it also initially lowers the coefficient of friction a lot (requiring stronger springs or more preload) and eventually makes the plates sticky. What I have found works better is to dip the friction plates in a 5% solution of Archoil AR2400 Dry Film Lubricant in alcohol and allow to dry. This still gives a progressive take up, but the friction reduction is much less, so I have been able to use very light springs which in turn allows more clutch lift as there is less lost motion in the clutch operating mechanism. More recently I have fitted the VOC spares co "C1/V/DISHED PLATE" which has made the clutch action even more progressive.
 

Vincent Brake

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VOC Member
(dont tell anyone as it is a bit like cursing) on top of all above i use Harley primary chaincase oil, far better than ATF for the chain, just as good for the clutch, renew every 1000KM
 

Nigel Spaxman

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VOC Member
I have a multi plate clutch in my Rapide. I think it is the V2. It has Kawasaki style plates from Barnett made with kevlar. Apparently these same plates are used in Harleys. My clutch works very well, but at first I had to make some changes to get a bit more lift of the pressure plate. I use a clutch lever with 1 1/8" between the cable and fulcrum center. The standard Vincent levers are only 7/8" so they give less cable travel. Also I changed the clutch adjuster on the gearbox outer cover to one with a large head on it. VOC sells those and this also gives you a bit more lift. I can't remember for sure but I think I ended up with about .040" lift and that was enough. I also made sure the pressure plate lifted straight. When I got the clutch one of the holes was not tapped deep enough so the clutch didn't lift evenly. Someone had corrected that problem by having a clutch pushrod with about a 3/4" diameter end on it that tended to make the clutch lift evenly even though the spring pressure was not even. The more lift you add the harder the clutch lift at the lever becomes. I use just four springs in the clutch but there is room for 6 springs. I tried three springs but then the clutch slipped. I run the clutch wet in ATF. I have used the Harley branded oil in my Norton before and it does give the clutch a very good grip and that oil is quite thick.
 
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