• Welcome to the forum website of the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club.

    Should you have any questions relating to the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club, or Vincent H.R.D. motorcycles in general, please contact Graham Smith, Online Forum Webmaster by calling 07977 001 025 or please CLICK HERE.

    You are unrecognised, and therefore, only have VERY restricted access to the many features of this forum website.

    If you have previously registered to use this forum website, you should log in now. CLICK HERE.

    If you have never registered to use this forum website before, please CLICK HERE.

Mudguards

Pete Appleton

VOC Hon. Editor
VOC Member
VOC Forum Website Administrator
Come on Russ, Get some ordered

Cost to put right would put a pair of guards at £250.

Is £250 for a pair of really well made stainless guards really too much money? They will last you a life time and if you take into account the time that you spend polishing the alloy ones ( or in my case getting someone else to polish them) then I think that it is a bargain. I don't know how much a set of the alloy ones will cost but spending £150 or so on second best really does seem like a bad deal.


Pete
 

Blue-Vinny

Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Is £250 for a pair of really well made stainless guards really too much money? They will last you a life time and if you take into account the time that you spend polishing the alloy ones ( or in my case getting someone else to polish them) then I think that it is a bargain. I don't know how much a set of the alloy ones will cost but spending £150 or so on second best really does seem like a bad deal.


Pete

Isn't alloy the original spec :confused:

Why polish off the useful layer of protective oxide ? ;)
I did too much polishing in the RN to bother with all that. :mad:
Sadly a muppet polished un-natural parts on one of my Triumphs and I had to get them blasted to try and regain the ex-works look :rolleyes:
 

Pete Appleton

VOC Hon. Editor
VOC Member
VOC Forum Website Administrator
Protective oxide my ar**

Isn't alloy the original spec :confused:

You're right alloy is the original spec and it even looks better than stainless, on other peoples bikes. Unfortunately I have an aversion to 'rubbing' motorcycles. Do the winter pennine and the winter welsh then talk to me about 'protective oxidisation' :p

Pete
 
R

Rap998

Guest
S/S Mudguards.

Russ,
I think you should go ahead and try and put S/S Mudguards on the shelf. I couldn't give a 'hoot' if alloy are the original. At £250 it sounds good to me.
Look at the other options at the moment. Very little and you may get them on the shelf before the Birmabright reps!



Isn't alloy the original spec :confused:

Why polish off the useful layer of protective oxide ? ;)
I did too much polishing in the RN to bother with all that. :mad:
Sadly a muppet polished un-natural parts on one of my Triumphs and I had to get them blasted to try and regain the ex-works look :rolleyes:
 

Blue-Vinny

Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Having spent navy sea time "up North" (-40°C and below and all that), combined with many years without a car or heated grips or any such rubbish, I have permanently damaged the nerve ends in my fingers and these days I lose all feeling at anything below +5°C or so. That makes it too dangerous to ride unprotected in winter - in fact I understand it is more dangerous to ride like that than after 4 pints of beer (howsoever politically incorrect that might be !)
So nowadays I use something more modern with heated grips and h/bar muffs in winter and leave the rest to the proper hard men (yes I know I could put them on an old bike, but I have 17 bikes, so why bother ?)
I have currently got three Landrovers and have had well over a dozen before these. I know all about Birmabrite, as that is what the body work is made of (the inner wings and underbody are un-painted and they are used all year round.)
I always found that covering bike wheel rims (chrome or aluminium) in grease or wax during winter worked quite well. They do get mega-dirty - adding to the hard man image, but clean up OK in Spring. The same trick would presumably apply to alloy mudguards. My aircraft contacts give me some wonder spray, which is excellent where alloy meets steel. It would probably as a protective coat too.
One useful trick in winter is to buy a nice new pump-up garden sprayer and keep it filled with a gallon of fresh water. As soon as you get in, wash down the bike with a spray of fresh water. Plus the little nozzle gets into all of the hard places.
Besides, winter in Paris is milder than the North of England and even better that that if we head South, so inox is un-necessary. As a Southern Jessie anyway, why would I ride to the Pennines in winter when Lyon and even M****illes are closer?
I have a particular aversion to inox fixings, whose liberal use where not originally specified has trashed the originality of too many bikes just to make them shiny and to make the parts sellers rich. The rubbish I have taken off one of my beezers beggars belief. Made out of metric hex-bar and sold by a most reputable supplier. Not to mention the plethora of inox specifications, meaning many of the fixings actually grip worse in cast alloy than cadmium, zinc or chromed fixings and then they strip threads when you take them out.
Nope, alloy it will be.
 
Last edited:
Warning! This thread is more than 15yrs ago old.
It's likely that no further discussion is required, in which case we recommend starting a new thread. If however you feel your response is required you can still do so.

Top