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MOT for travel to Europe


Kevin Emery

Website User
VOC Member
Hello., I intend to travel to Europe this summer. I am based in the UK. My Vincent twin is classified as a Classic and as such does not need tax or an MOT. If I travel to Europe do I need to put an MOT on it.
Thank you
Kevin
 

Alan J

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I don't think so, most police abroad check your driving licence and insurance- you had better print it out before you go as many companies don't send you paper certificates any more! Plus important to carry your log. Book, I saw a chap refused entry into Estonia as he had not got it with him!
 

Graham Smith

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Administrator
VOC Forum Moderator
I didn’t have an MOT on my bike when I took it to the International Rally in Austria last year.
 

Russell Kemp

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
My view for what it is worth. Just because your bike does not require an MOT does not mean you should not get one. The tester might spot something that you have missed.
 

Alan J

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
My view for what it is worth. Just because your bike does not require an MOT does not mean you should not get one. The tester might spot something that you have missed.
Russel, 6 times £30 every year is a lot of money for some very old bikes that do a minimal mileage!
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Last time I went for an MOT with an old bike...

Tester "there is a small movement sideways at the rim"
Me "The hub has taper bearings with 5-7 thou clearance I can have up to a 1/32 in total" according to the service notes from the manufacturer"
Tester "taper bearings ? I have heard of a thou but whats a 1/32".....
 

peter holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I used to dread the annual MOT test coming round, especially when every old-timer MOT tester around these parts either retired or died, the last one I used was a younger man, but he appreciated such things as inadequate brakes and wheel rim float, and I do think that if you own and ride a Vincent, or any old bike for that matter, you really should be able to judge whether your bike is road worthy or not, starting with tyres, spokes, wheel bearings, brakes, frame bearings, lights, horn, etc. but even back then, one of the old boys I use to use, John Lipscomb of Burnham took the trouble to tell me during one test that my footrest rubbers were quite worn and that he could fail it on that, but decided just to advise me to replace them.
 

Vincent Brake

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
your still in EU for that matter,

so do as is in ur country needed/required, than can ride all EU over, is my take on it.

when out of EU is a totally diffrnt matter....

oh oh i started it....
 

Kevin Emery

Website User
VOC Member
Thank you for your opinions. But, I am trying to find out what the legal position is.
French Motorcycles in France do not require an MOT. I have checked many web sites some say you need an MOT to travel in France (but doesn't explain why) some do not mention MOT's being a relevant document. None of the websites cover UK bikes that are classed as Historic.
So just because French motorcycles don't require an MOT doesn't mean that mine doesn't when I travel there.
This appears to be an area of the law which is unclear. I don't want to be in the position of having to argue the point with a French policeman who is trying to give me an on-the-spot-fine.
Does anyone know what the legal position is?
Thank you.
 

Chris Launders

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
As I understand it your vehicle is only required to conform with your own countries laws, as far as I know this has always been the case, a French resident would not be required to get an MOT on his modern bike visiting the UK, I've been to a few European countries several times on a BSA or Triumph Chopper running 30" over extended forks which would be totally illegal in several countries but because of the GB plate was never bothered by the police.
 

Colin

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Last time I went for an MOT with an old bike...

Tester "there is a small movement sideways at the rim"
Me "The hub has taper bearings with 5-7 thou clearance I can have up to a 1/32 in total" according to the service notes from the manufacturer"
Tester "taper bearings ? I have heard of a thou but whats a 1/32".....
I have, in the past, much the same sort of comment from a young tester. When I quoted him the Vincent sevice notes he accepted without hesitation and had the grace to say he had learned something,about Vins. This from a small long established family motorbike shop
 

Kevin Emery

Website User
VOC Member
Hello Bill

I contacted Glyn Baxter as you advised and it was very productive. Glyn forwarded a copy of an article by the Federation of British Vehicle Clubs which refered to the EU Roadworthiness Directive 2014/45. This is the key. This is the legal document to which we should refer. Having read it I understand why there is some confusion.

Let me explain the reasons for my initial enquiry. Friends of my son went to Germany last year in highly modified cars. All of the modifications were noted in their insurance documents and they had current UK MOT's. They were stopped by the German Police, their cars were held for a week then released but they had to trailer them home. Given that background I wanted to understand how I stood with respect to a trip to France on my vehicle with no MOT.

Back to the EU Roadworthiness Directive 2014/45.

This is a very lengthy document with many relevant parts. These are the parts I believe most relevant. My apologies in advance for the lengthy reply.

Definition of a Historic Vehicle / Vehicle of interest:


7)‘vehicle of historical interest’ means any vehicle which is considered to be historical by the Member State of registration or one of its appointed authorising bodies and which fulfils all the following conditions:


it was manufactured or registered for the first time at least 30 years ago;


its specific type, as defined in the relevant Union or national law, is no longer in production;


it is historically preserved and maintained in its original state and has not undergone substantial changes in the technical characteristics of its main components;

So my Vincent meets that definition.


(13)Vehicles of historical interest are supposed to conserve the heritage of the period during which they were constructed, and are considered to be hardly used on public roads. It should be left to Member States to determine the periodicity of roadworthiness testing for such vehicles. It should also be for Member States to regulate roadworthiness testing for other types of specialised vehicles.

So it is down to the UK government to determine the frequency of MOT. Or if none is required. So it is the responsibility of the UK government to determine if I need an MOT not the member state I am travelling to.


(18)Vehicles used on public roads are required to be roadworthy when they are used. The holder of the registration certificate and, where applicable, the operator of the vehicle should be responsible for keeping the vehicle in a roadworthy condition.

It is down to the rider/operator to ensure the vehicle is Roadworthy, even without an MOT. Fair enough.


(19)It is important for road safety and for its impact on society that vehicles used on roads should be in a proper technical condition. Therefore, Member States should not be prevented from allowing, on a voluntary basis, additional roadworthiness tests.

This is the 'get out clause' which allows any Member State to do additional Roadworthy tests.

In conclusion: I can take my Vincent to France without an MOT as it is not required in the UK. It is my responsibility to ensure my vehicle is roadworthy and safe. If they so wish the European Member States can ignore this and apply their own additional Roadworthy test.

I have my answer and understand why my son's friends cars were impounded. Thank you Bill for referring me to Glyn. Thank you Glyn for pointing me to the correct Legal document.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
As an old MOT man on Cars, You can only say "On the day of test", It was OK,
All sorts of tricky stuff can happen after,
So it's always down to the rider on the day they are pulled up !!.

I knew a Police Man who borrowed a BMW K100 front wheel !, Just for the MOT,
Because his friends front wheel did not run very true, They were a bit weak.
Good Luck, Bill.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Reading that item 19 in context Therefore, Member States should not be prevented from allowing, on a voluntary basis, additional roadworthiness tests.
I understood this relates to the imposition of MOT,s (annual or at other frequencies) on their own citizens historic vehicles if they wish to introduce such legislation and has nothing to do with ad hock tests on Visitors vehicles .
So I still cannot see what the German police were up to impounding those vehicles.
Incidentally that phrase
and are considered to be hardly used on public roads.
Gives me a chill and makes me happy we are getting out of the EU and its persecution of anyone who dares to have a hobby that's a little different
 

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