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More alternators and brakes

deejay499

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have the alternator set up from timetraveller on my Prince outfit, luckily hidden under the cowls. Today I went for a ride to try out my recently fitted heated grips and with them turned on and entering a tunnel, put my headlights on (also have one on the sidecar) and even at low engine revs, the ammeter did not budge. Even when coming to a stop, it balances easy. Only a small 4ah battery is fitted.

I have also posted a couple of photos of my rear disc brake set up. As the Prince has no mudguard stays, it can be mounted at the top, and only the bottom of the disc is visible from a little way off or by bending down. I have kept the single rear drum working as you may as well have all the braking possible on an outfit. Both drum and disc work off the same pedal, with the drum as original and the hydraulic cylinder working off the back of the pedal. I could post photos of the pedal set up if anyone is interested. Up front, I have racing type plates, instead of discs, as the weight transferance to the front is a lot less on an outfit especially with a light chair. A sidecar brake is also fitted.

Cheers, Dave
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
I have the same 2CV alternator based set-up. When I needed some extra advice in fitting it to a "B" Rapide, Timetraveller was very helpful at the end of the telephone.
My fingers get really painful when they are cold but the alternator enabled me to use the Vincent for three very cold runs over the Christmas period because I had enough generating capacity to run heated gloves. OK so it doesn't look 100% original but I built my bike to ride rather than to just look at. No disrespect to Vincent Owners who are not Vincent Riders as I think that Vincents are classically beautiful pieces of motor cycle engineering. I'll admit to being a Phil Irving fan. :)

Regards,
Eddy
 

peterg

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
Howdy Dave,

That is quite impressive, but if I may be so cheeky to observe, a 4ah battery is woefully undersized in this application and your regulator is working its behind off to balance the load with so little buffer in the system. If that battery is anything other than a traditional lead acid, you run the risk of overheating it as gel's and agm's do not dissipate heat as effectively.

Your battery is the capacitor in your charging system. The smaller it is relative to output of the charging device against a higher variation in load - as would be achieved by going from everything off to not one but two lights and heated grips - the more your regulator will duty cycle in a typical operating cycle.

Admittedly, sophisticated electronics have alleviated the need to have 28 ah batteries coupled to generators struggling to make 60 watts like Indians favored but they also assume some reserve in the system and thus size their cooling capacity thusly based on the expected duty cycle parameters.

The popular PODtronics over here has only as four shallow alloy fins about 2 inches long an 1/16 high...metric translation for Brussel-lians not available at the moment. A good rule of thumb for a happy system is to have a battery ah rate that at a minimum exceeds your charging device output if you've got some heavy users like starters and anything that's basically almost a short like heated grips.

And BigEd, for those of us of low self esteem, desperate to tow both sides of the line in any conversation, I've solved that by having a shiny one to gander at without guilt...and then a dusty oil stained wretch painted with 5 rattle cans of Krylon to ride.
 

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timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thank you for your support and kind comments gentlemen. For those who care number 51 has just been ordered. A long way short of Alton numbers but enough to have come across most of the snags. With regard to peterg's remarks on battery capacity; these alternators can produce 30 amps so with those criteria a 30 ah battery would be required. I suspect that might be a bit chunky on a solo. However, what is most important is that we get to enjoy our bikes and decent lights and heated grips. gloves, waistcoats and other bits can only help in this weather. Happy riding.
 

deejay499

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I agree that a larger capacity battery is more desirable, but space was a problem. I have had this set up for a few years now and have just put on the 2nd battery, so I am sure the battery life was shortened. I do not have the alternator charging when lights etc are not being used as the battery is sufficient for indicators and stop lights and may need only a brief top up when doing longer journeys.
Like Eddy, I have found the hands have got colder as I got older, and have heated gloves, but decided that heated grips are more practical and convenient, especially for shorter trips. Just for the record, heated gloves work better, as with the grips the back of your hands still get chilled.
Note 2009 rides below. They would have been more uncomfortable without some sort of heat.
Cheers, Dave
 

peterg

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
Howdy Dave,

Whoopsy, just assumed this was for a chair - based on your avatar - where one has the luxury of such, but now that I read your sig, there's some solo use in the mix. I used to have a supplemental battery wired in parallel with the stock one in the trunk of my LS200 to run my various illuminated trinkets from Hella.

Nonetheless, PowerSonic makes a nice 12V 12AH here, for example, that will fit right in your tray with a few shims. Though it shows spade terminals on that one, I generally prefer conventional and more durable terminals provided in their PS-6 series I use.
 

John Cone

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Battery space on an Enclosed "D" is not a big problem. I run the 2CV alternator and had a friend who works with fibreglass moulded me a battery box that fits the n/side contours of the rear cowl. he bonded 2 studs into the the cowl so the battery box is held on by 2 nuts & washers. To connect the battery i've used the standard 2 pin rubber plug and socket as used on gardening equipment. I'm using 14 ah battery as it's the same thats fitted to my Yamaha & Honda. I can take a photo should anyone need to copy it.
 

deejay499

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Hi Peter. Yes, Sorry, I have deviated to the odd solo use at times, and having had a Vincent outfit since 1963, makes a pleasant and enjoyable change.:D
Thanks for the battery info. I might put a larger one, or two small ones in the chair next time. The problem with putting an alternator on the Prince is that you have to do away with the battery carrier, hence a space problem. The bike will run without a battery, so can run in the daylight ok.

Thanks John. Dick S made up a frame to fit inside the rear cowl for his battery. A good idea.

Cheers, Dave
 
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Alan J

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Watts

Lots of info !!-my 12 a.mp. battery lives in the pannier {if you drag around a sidecar, Dave as we both do, plenty of space}. We all seem to require more and more electricity in our complicated lives, in our houses{my mother's kitchen had only ONE electric socket} I just came back from the Bristol Bike show-150 miles {240 k.m.-only joking,these French measurements creep in everywhere!!} wearing good thermals and heated gips on my Italian steed {shame} in plus 2 c. and it was O.K.!!As I said recently, you need good electrics if you travel abroad-as lights are often compulsory.:confused::confused:
 

Ken Tidswell

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
What you should have said Norman, Is .thank you for your support i shall always wear it, i hope to be fitting your set-up in the very near future ,Bury permitting. Ken
 

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