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loose spindle

redbloke1956

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Hi all, I have just removed my Comet Cam spindle (as mentioned in a previous post) and I found that my new spindle is 1.5 thou smaller diameter than the old one, it looks as though the old spindle may have been "built up" where it inserts into crankcase with a material at some time.
The new spindle is only just a sliding fit into the case: so there is probably only a thou or less difference between hole and spindle, is there a suitable loctite or similar product that I can use or should the new spindle also be built up?

Kevin
 

Howard

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Try Loctite 648. No promises, but I've had some success with it.

I think it depends what you're after, and how you intend to use the bike, eg quick fix for pottering should be fine, but permanent fix for flat out racing would be a definite no no.

H
 

roy the mechanic

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
be warned-there is NO chemical substance which will rectify worn metal! the bore it fits in must be, by now oval. even god does not have a machine to make an oval spindle to make it right.the bore needs to be re-machined and a special spindle made to suit."thats the way it is" good luck.
 

John Appleton

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
On this occasion I agree with Roy. Put the loctite in the cupboard along with the JB Weld, Holts piston seal, Radweld and all the other snake oil remedies, do the job properly and do it once.
Remember that the way to remove a Loctited componant is to apply a small amount of heat. Do you really want that in your hot engine?

John
 

Howard

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
http://www.loctite.sg/sea/content_data/93769_Loctite_648_Retaining_Compound.pdf

Seems like I'm out on my own. I can't argue with any of the comments, and agree totally with doing the job right first time, but if you need to gain some time until a proper rebuild, try Loctite.

We old duffers forget that aeroplanes are "glued together" now, ships propellors are "glued" on prop shafts, autmotive gears are "glued" on shafts etc etc.

Redbloak didn't mention an oval bore, if it's oval an oversized spindle won't be the answer without machining the case to match.

Loctite 648 needs heating to 200 C plus to remove.

Yes, in an ideal world strip the engine, have the case bored accurately, and a spindle made to suit - Redbloke's question was "is there a suitable Loctite?"

H

ps My view maybe UK tainted. We are already in May of a very short (good weather ?) riding season. The good workshops are always busy and could take up to 2 months to do the work.
 
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Black Flash

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
+1 for loctite. if the spindle is still well guided in the hole and does not wobble around I would use Loctite 648. You have to follow the instructions closely and turn the spindle after inserting in the whole.
I had a talk with a loctite representative a few years ago. he explained to me that L. is some kind of microballs incapsulated epoxy resin. When turning the spindle you sort of crack the microballs and mix the resin and hardener.
For a standard streetbike, I would think it will give a repair that should last for 20.000 + mls. So after the riding season you can dismantle your engine, split the cases and have the timing side rebuilt professionally. But be aware splitting the cases usually reveals even more problems and adds sums to the total cost.
 

redbloke1956

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
+1 for loctite. if the spindle is still well guided in the hole and does not wobble around I would use Loctite 648. You have to follow the instructions closely and turn the spindle after inserting in the whole.
I had a talk with a loctite representative a few years ago. he explained to me that L. is some kind of microballs incapsulated epoxy resin. When turning the spindle you sort of crack the microballs and mix the resin and hardener.
For a standard streetbike, I would think it will give a repair that should last for 20.000 + mls. So after the riding season you can dismantle your engine, split the cases and have the timing side rebuilt professionally. But be aware splitting the cases usually reveals even more problems and adds sums to the total cost.

Thanks Black Flash, I have worked in the aeronautical industry for over 22 years and our wide ranging use of Loctite gives me great confidence in their products, I have never come across a single product that didn't validate their claims.
The new spindle is a very good fit in the hole, in fact you can even feel the compressing of air as the spindle is inserted and the partial vaccuum as it is removed, I can feel virtually no discernible wobble from the spindle when fully inserted either.
I will certainly ponder the amassed info from this thread but I think I will at least try the Loctite until I can actually start the machine for the first time.
I know that upon first start I am bound to come across even more problems, as you mentioned, so far each repair I have carried out has uncovered even more issues...(far more than I expected considering how much I paid for the bike)...but that is the nature of a 60 year old beast.
Thanks again
Kevin
 

redbloke1956

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Sorry Howard I didn't see your response until I read the one from Black Flash (above) My response to him applies to you also, thanks for the Loctite link...what temp do you think the case around the spindle would reach in everyday riding?
Another issue I have is: Quote "ps My view maybe UK tainted. We are already in May of a very short (good weather ?) riding season. The good workshops are always busy and could take up to 2 months to do the work." Firstly I haven't ever used a workshop for anything so I don't have one yet that I would trust to playing around with my cases...and as much as I hate to say it (being Irish born), I personally think that MOST of the Australian Fitters/Turners/Machinists/welders etc that I have worked with over the years didn't come close to the skills of the expat Poms we have here....sorry if this offends any aussies reading - this but that is simply what I have found...Every time I have come across excellence in skills it has been at the hands of ex poms (or one Irishman I work with currently)
 
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