• Welcome to the website of the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club.

    Should you have any questions relating to the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club, or Vincent H.R.D. motorcycles in general, please contact Graham Smith, Hon. Editor and Webmaster by calling 07977 001 025 or please CLICK HERE.

    You are unrecognised, and therefore, only have VERY restricted access to the many features of this website.

    If you have previously registered to use this forum, you should log in now. CLICK HERE.

    If you have never registered to use this website before, please CLICK HERE.

T: Fuel Tank Long term Vincent storage, avoiding rust in the petrol tank


craig

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have a couple Vincent bikes with steel tanks that need long tern storage and have been ridden up to this point with gasoline at 10% ethanol.
My experience shows that the steel tank will rust inside, some quite a bit others not so much, but rust either way.

I don't want to plastic coat or in fact any type of cream.
So looking for an oil coat or some product meant for this type storage.

I have nice paint on both so not a treatment that will stand a chance of paint damage.

What is typically done for museum storage, such as Barber, Wheels thru Time, UK museums or others?

Thank youMO19Gastank.jpg
 
Last edited:

druridge

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have a couple Vincent bikes with steel tanks that need long tern storage and have been ridden up to this point with gasoline at 10% ethanol.
My experience shows that the steel tank will rust inside, some quite a bit others not so much, but rust either way.

I don't want to plastic coat or in fact any type of cream.
So looking for an oil coat or some product meant for this type storage.

I have nice paint on both so not a treatment that will stand a chance of paint damage.

What is typically done for museum storage, such as Barber, Wheels thru Time, UK museums or others?

Thank youView attachment 25497
I mix up a slug of 2 stroke oil with a little petrol, then rinse around the MT tank, remove the cap and vent. The petrol evaporates leaving the oil behind. Learnt this from observing the rust-free tanks on 2 strokes.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Can you buy Aspen petrol in US? its a petrol intended for lawn mowers (whatever they are:p) so have not ethanol its exspensive another ethanol fuel is racing or aviation petrol
 

Nulli Secundus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
I think the ethanol free Aspen fuel also does not go stale like widely available fuels are meant to. So a laid up bike with Aspen in the tank should be good to go when required. I said think, so some research might be required.

A best solution might be Aspen with two stroke oil and keep the cap on. It would be handy if the fuel could be used in a two stroke after storage.
 

craig

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I don't want any liquid in the tank, as the bikes will be stored in the house.
I like the oil coat ideas, but i also see VCI (Vapor Corrosion Inhibitor) products and wondered if this is what museums use for storage. VCI looks to be the product for gun storage and electronic components as well.

VCIs bond electro-chemically with metal surfaces to form a protective "molecular umbrella," sealing out the air and moisture that causes rust and corrosion.

I think a pak of 6 strips cost $12

91016.jpg

Bull frog strips
 
Last edited:

greg brillus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
One big problem with tanks on bikes that have the original push/pull fuel taps is they will dry out and the corks shrink. Next time the tank is filled, fuel will leak from the taps badly...........Both internally and externally. Just something to think about...........
 

Dinny

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I would just drain the tank, remove the taps and let the tank dry out. Refit the taps and mist in some WD40 and call it good. I wouldn’t expect it to rust inside a house either.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Dont forget its also the carb especially those in monkey metal that corrode if left with ethanol in them.
In the UK when we go to 10% and there is no longer a Esso loophole what we need is a way of buying aviation fuel and pay the tax so we can get the right stuff and small airfields can get extra income.
.
.
 

Mike 40M

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Corrosion is caused by water and oxygen. Humid air contains both. So you have to keep one or both components away from the bare metal. One way is a protective coating. Different things can be used. 2-stroke oil looks like a good idea. I've heard that WD40 was initially made for keeping nuclear missiles not to corrode in the siloes. This treatment lasted for half a year. I've also heard that WD40 has a different content nowadays. Cold storage will cause condensation on the surface with temperature changes, keep them indoors. If you happens to live in a desert, you'll have less problems. There are other methods too.
 

van drenth

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I would just drain the tank, remove the taps and let the tank dry out. Refit the taps and mist in some WD40 and call it good. I wouldn’t expect it to rust inside a house either.
Also drain the carburators
Regards. van Drenth JC>
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I am blessed in that my workshop is an old (150-200 year) cow shed half brick and then ship lapboarding with a high roof and tiled in big old clay tiles its never been air tight ( the windows are boarded) and what ever fast changes of weather and temperature I have never known any condensation, The lathe bed is a place I always check and it never is damp.
I only switch on a gas blow heater when I am in there otherwise jack frost rules in the winter and in the summer its never too hot.
Those old farm builders knew their stuff
 

stumpy lord

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I am blessed in that my workshop is an old (150-200 year) cow shed half brick and then ship lapboarding with a high roof and tiled in big old clay tiles its never been air tight ( the windows are boarded) and what ever fast changes of weather and temperature I have never known any condensation, The lathe bed is a place I always check and it never is damp.
I only switch on a gas blow heater when I am in there otherwise jack frost rules in the winter and in the summer its never too hot.
Those old farm builders knew their stuff
I don't know if this, ACS 50 is available in the states, but might be worth looking at. It is an anti corrosive wax which comes in an aerosol can ,and is designed to not only to protect against corrosion but to get in to all the little cracks, and orifices. We found it to be great for protecting the frames on modern Japanese bikes , where corrosion breaks out around all the little brackets. should be great for inside tanks
stumpy lord
 

Top